The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1493206 (stock #K099)
The Kura
$5,500.00
Sale Pending
Flowers blossom all about this soft pink vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan I published in the book Miyagawa Kozan Yukasai (2018), page 32 figure 25. A copy of the book will be included. It comes in a modern wooden storage box. According to the book it was made circa 1902. The vase is 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) diameter, 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493138 (stock #K081)
The Kura
$495.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful dark plum colored glass bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Glass Bowl and dating from the 1920s to 30s. Attesting to its early origins, it bears the artist stamp on the base, which is rarely seen later. It is roughly 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 7 cm (just less than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493137 (stock #K080)
The Kura
$450.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful early footed bowl of colored glass with sweeping clear glass handles by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the rare original signed wooden box titled Sango-Iro Garasu Hachi (Coral Colored Glass Bowl). It is 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter, 14cm tall (5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, bearing the artist seal in gold on the base.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493135 (stock #K082)
The Kura
$545.00
Sale Pending
A glass Bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the very rare original signed wooden box titled Ryomimitsuki Kajutsumori (Fruit Dish with Two Handles). Inside the box lid is written: For the 2nd Emerging Glass Solo Exhibition Held at Takashimaya in the Early Summer of 1936. It is 28×24 x 8 cm (11 x 9-3/4 x 3 inches) and is in excellent condition. Acquiring a piece by Toshichi with such detail about its past is a decidedly rare opportunity.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1493134 (stock #K017)
The Kura
$6,500.00
Sale Pending
A breathtaking box covered entirely in gold with geese taking flight beyond blossoming plum trees overhanging the waters edge. The flowers are in red and silver, the rest of the surface is powdered gold with kirigane inlay of cut squares of gold intimating lichen and shadow on the stones. The themes are repeated on all sides of the box. Inside fans emblazoned with seasonal flowers and pine boughs decorate the Nashiji surface. The box is 29 x 24 x 16 cm (just less than 12 x 10 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a lacquered wooden storage box, dating from the later Meiji to Taisho era.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493058 (stock #K097)
The Kura
$1,350.00
Polished layered-lacquer lozenges are inlayed into the surface of this fabulous Art-Deco era vase by important Japanese Bronze artist Yamamoto Junmin. The lacquered pieces have been cut and polished from variously colored layered lacquer. The vase is signed on the base Junmin, and measures 27.5 cm (11 inches) diameter, 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall. It is in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Junmin (1882 – 1962) learned the metal arts under Katori Hotsuma (Hozuma) and Asakura Fumio at the Tokyo University of Art. Living in Nara, the ancient capital, he was one of the finest metal workers of his age, carrying on the Edo-doki tradition through the early Showa era while also incorporating many ideas and innovations from Art Deco into hos oeuvre. His work was exhibited with the Teiten/Bunten National Exhibitions many times before the second world war, and with the Nitten National Exhibition post-war. The National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto holds two works by this important bronze artist, as well as the Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1492992 (stock #K086)
The Kura
$2,500.00
A lacquered writing box in the shape of a kimono sleeve (sode) covered in soaring silver and gold geese among autumn reeds and Togidashi clouds with a secondary (inner) sleeve shape covered in Karakusa vine tendrils on black enclosed in an age darkened kiri wood box. The inside is covered entirely in nashiji gold powder, and contains a grinding stone, and a water dropper of copper inset into the tray. Also enclosed are a bamboo brush and gilded ink stick decorated with a squirrel on a grapevine made by Koundo. The box is 22 x 15 x 3.5cm (8-1/2 x 6 x 1-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Artists : Paintings : Contemporary item #1492941 (stock #K098)
The Kura
$300.00
Sale Pending
An exploration of color by Nagoya based artist Hamada Juri mounted in a gold frame titled Chi no Hana (Earth Flower). The frame is 33.5 x 33.5 x 5cm, the painted disk is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, and all is in excellent condition.
Hamada Juri was born in Indonesia in 1973, and graduated the Aichi Prefectural University of Art in 1997 (The graduation art Submission was awarded ad purchased by the University). Two years later Juri graduated advanced studies at the same university, and that piece too was collected. In 2010 Juri was awarded the New artist prize by Nagoya City, and was again awarded in 2012. That same year received the Higashiyama Kai Taisho prize, and in 2013 the Aichi prefectural Culture award. Work is held in the Aichi Prefectural Museum, Hiratsuka Museum of Art, Takahashi Ryutaro collection and the aforementioned Aichi Prefectural Art University among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1940 item #1492918 (stock #K090)
The Kura
$4,900.00
Sale Pending
A beautifully crafted basket by Tanabe Chikuunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hirokuchi Senshu-ami Hanakago (Wide Mouthed Senshu-weave Basket). It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 35 cm (14 inches) tall and retains the original bamboo insert. A similar basket is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1492917 (stock #K089)
The Kura
$650.00
A set of five lacquer lined covered bowls made from natural gourds enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Hyo Suimono Wan indicating they are for serving thin soup to cleanse the palate between courses. In Japanese cuisine, presentation is everything. Texture and color may in fact be more important than flavor. The dishes used as well, should be a feast for the eyes, and you will find every aspect of the traditional meal is presented in its own unique setting. These bowls are 7 to 8.5 cm (roughly 3 inches plus) diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and all are in excellent condition. According to Arigatojapan, Suimono, literally meaning 'dish to sip,' is a refreshing type of clear soup that is meant to cleanse the palate in between dishes. Often very light and slightly umami in taste, it is one of the oldest and most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #1492916 (stock #K024)
The Kura
$320.00
A late 19th to early 20th century bottle, properly titled, I would say, Inbe Ito-me Heso Tokkuri or Bizen Thread textured Dimpled Bottle. A seal impressed into the base is partly illegible, but the characters Bizen-Inbe are clearly visible on the right, with the character tokoro (Place) bottom center and a name ending in Ro on the left. The vessel is 27 cm tall and in excellent condition. That size would make an excellent vase.
Also known as Ningyo Tokkuri, this type of bottle is usually dimpled on three sides with an image of one of the lucky gods, Ebisu, Daikoku, Hotei or Jurojin in one of the dimples. They have been popular since at least the 17th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1492876 (stock #K083)
The Kura
$700.00
Pink, purple and red glazes mingle on the surface of this Mizusashi water jar by Matsuyama Gae enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kujaku-yu Mizusashi and signed inside the lid by the Urasenke Konnichi-an Grand Tea Master, Sen Genshitsu. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Gae I Returned from China in 1945, where he had been posted for eight years and had studied in depth ancient Chinese ceramics. In 1947 he opened his own kiln and immediately won acclaim, as well as the Mayors award for Kobe in 1948. Working together with his wife they developed this glaze through trial and error in 1951. Several pieces were collected by the Imperial Household agency in 1953 and 1954, and a vase was sent as a gift to then President Eisenhower in 1960. During this time they received many awards and presented at a great many exhibitions. Gae died in 1963 of cancer, and after one year of mourning, Tsutako continued the name and work. She continued to exhibit and was again accepted into the Imperial collection in 1964, and was also featured at the World Exposition in 1970 held in Osaka. When she passes away her daughter continued the family tradition, becoming the third and last Matsuyama Gae. Sen Genshitsu was born in Kyoto on April 19, 1923, as the first son of the 14th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Mugensai. His given name was Masaoki. He served as Urasenke Iemoto for thirty-eight years, up to the end of 2002, when he transferred the title and the hereditary name Soshitsu that goes with it to his eldest son, Zabosai. At that time, he changed his own name from Soshitsu to Genshitsu, and he became referred to by the title Daisosho, signifying his status as the once grand master. After serving as a pilot in the Airforce division of the Japanese navy during WWII, and then completing his temporarily interrupted university education at Doshisha University, Kyoto, graduating from the Faculty of Economics, he took Buddhist vows under Goto Zuigan, chief abbot of Daitokuji temple, and received the Buddhist names Hounsai Genshu Soko. In 1950, he was confirmed as heir apparent of Mugensai, and thus became referred to by the title Wakasosho. He made his first trip abroad that year, to Hawaii and the USA, and since then he has made more than three hundred trips abroad and been to more than sixty countries. He lived in Hawaii in 1952, during which time he lectured at and also took courses at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, beginning his long and dedicated association with that university. Upon Mugensai’s death in 1964, he succeeded as the 15th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Hounsai. He is widely known as a global-minded promoter both of the culture embraced by the Way of Tea and of World Peace. Among his many awards and recognitions, in 1997, he was awarded the Order of Culture by the Emperor of Japan.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1492828 (stock #K069)
The Kura
$1,575.00
A fabulous large porcelain vase by Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppoo) complete with a rosewood base enclosed in the original signed and compartmentalized wooden box titled Konko-yu Semi Monkizami Kabin (Golden Yellow Glazed Vase inscribed with Cicada Patterns). The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The baluster form rises to frets in the shape of stylized cicada under a belt of archaic figures and yotsu-domoe (yin-yang) symbols. It is 21 cm (just more than 8 inches) diameter 36.5 cm (14-3/4 inches) tall plus the base and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492827 (stock #K068)
The Kura
$1,250.00
A large porcelain vase by) Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppo) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yellow Porcelain Lightning Pattern Vase. The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The simplified form rises to a row of alternating concentric lines known as Lightning pattern. It is 21 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter 25 cm (10 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492756 (stock #K062)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Grain rises majestically on the surface of this pale vase by pioneering female potter Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mugi-mon Hanaire. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1492703 (stock #K088)
The Kura
$1,650.00
An image of the white robed Kannon (Quanyin), Goddess of Mercy, by Mashimizu Zoroku dating from the early 20th century. Exquisitely crafted, The figure is 14.5 x 12 x 21.5 cm (5-3/4 x 4-3/4 x 8-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kannon, also known as Guan-yin in Chinese or Avalokitasvara is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Generally shown as feminine or androgynous, she is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon.
Mashimizu Zoroku I ((Shimizu Tasaburo, 1822-1877) studied under his uncle Wake Kite and established his independent studio in 1843, taking the name Mashimizu Zoroku. He became independent in 1843 working along with Sen Soshitsu XI. His work was exhibited at the Vienna international exposition in 1873 and Philadelphia in 1876. Zoroku II (Jutaro,1861-1936) was born in the Gojo-zaka Pottery district of Kyoto and inherited the pottery tradition of his father, and, after his early death, continued under the guidance of his mother Chika, taking the name Zoroku in 1882. He was awarded at the Kyoto Kangyo Hakurankai Exposition. He colluded with some of the greatest artist of the day in reviving lost Japanese traditions such as Koyama Fujio and Arakawa Toyozo as well as being heavily involved in research into continental styles. He was a well regarded member of the city’s literatus, and is remembered for both his pottery and paintings in the Nanga tradition,
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1492679 (stock #K070)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large figure of the Daruma in celadon glaze by Teishitsu Gigei-in Suwa Sozan I set on to a rosewood stand and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The beautifully carved face and feet are in raw, burnt clay, the rest is entirely robed in pale green. It is 18.5 x 16.5 x 36cm (7-1/4 x 6-1/2 x 14 inches) plus the stand and is in excellent condition, signed inside with his koban shaped oval seal.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.