The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Contemporary item #1469308 (stock #OC061)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A wide flaring bowl of delicate celadon with raised floral motifs by Imperail Artist Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji Chawan and bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 16 cm (6-1/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1472380 (stock #L003)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted wooden tray covered in black lacquer carved in the Kamakura Bori tradition from the Hakkodo Studio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kamakura Bori Kashi Bachi Hana Karakusa (Kamakura Carved Vessel with Scrolling Flower Design). It is 36.5 x 26.5 x 5.5 cm (14-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
In the 12th-13th centuries, when Kamakura prospered as the samurai capital, Zen Buddhism was introduced from China, and many Zen temples were built, including Kamakura Gozan. The architectural style of these temples was modeled after the Tang style of China and he interior decoration, furniture, and Buddhist altar fittings were similarly Tang style. Along with Zen. celadons, bronze vases, Tsuishu and other cultural objects were brought from China. Tsuishu is a vessel formed only with layers of lacquer, and a pattern is carved on the surface. A very time-consuming process, these usually small articles were highly valued. Wood-carved lacquered incense cases imitating this were made by carving a vessel of wood and applying lacquer to finish it. This is believed to be the beginning of Kamakura-bori, and it is accepted that it was made by a Buddhist sculptors for temples. In the Momoyama period, the design and carving became dynamic and deep moving away from imitation to an art form of its own. In the Edo period, we can see a growth in production, with even everyday items such as tea utensils and braziers being produced, as well as larger secular works such as trays and even small furnishings. Around this time, the name 'Kamakura-bori' began to appear in books dealing with tea utensils. The Goto family, the current head of Hakkodo, descended from the Kei school of Buddhist sculptors who came from Nara to create Buddhist statues for Zen Buddhist temples. Due to the Meiji government's edict to abolish Buddhism, they moved to revive and reinvent the Meiji Kamakura-bori. From the Meiji through the Taisho and into the Showa era, new techniques were developed and established as a field of crafts. After the war, Kamayama Mitsuhashi and Shuntaro Goto formed an association, and in 1977, Kamakura Bori was designated a traditional craft.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1483918
The Kura
$2,800.00
Sale Pending
A fabulous modern vase tracing design patterns back into the art-deco era by Sanuki artist Hashimoto Kota exhibited in 1995 at the Kagawa Ken Shitsugei Kenkyusho Exhibition. Gold dusted snails crawl on overlapping leaves in various autumn tones carved through to reveal alternating layers of cream and dusky hazel colored lacquer beneath. The vase is 12.5 x 12.5 x 26.5 cm (5 x 5 x 10-1/2 inches) and is in perfect condition, enclosed in a wooden storage box.
Hashimoto Kota was born in Takamatsu City in 1974. At the age of fifteen he entered the Kosho lacquer studio at the same time as he entered the Kagawa Prefectural Crafts High School, graduating both in 1991. He then entered the Kagawa Lacquer Art Research Institute where he studied from 1992-1995. After years of study he obtained the qualification of a second-class architect. According to him the experience of learning about color, shape, and the role of tools and people in daily life through traditional crafts served served to help understand the importance of the "buildings" that envelop them. From 2012 he has also worked with lacquer art at Sanuki Urushi Shinra.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1481801
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
An exquisite hand-formed koro, the tri-legged form hammered from a single sheet of copper gilded with gold and signed on the base Goro. The top is created in the same manner pierced with three holes, and it has an insert of the same alloy to keep heat away from the softly gleaming body. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Uchidashi is a traditional Japanese metalworking technique that involves hammering or embossing designs onto the surface of metal objects. This technique is often used to create intricate patterns, textures, and relief designs on various metal objects, such as armor. Taking it to the extreme, and entire three dimensional object such as a koro or animal figurine, can be hammered out from a single plate of metal. Uchidashi is a labor-intensive technique that requires a high level of skill, precision, and artistic creativity. It has been traditionally used in the creation of decorative and functional metal objects. This technique showcases the mastery of Japanese metal craftsmen and their ability to turn simple pieces of metal into intricate works of art.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #1482363
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite image of an emaciated man, the prominent bones about the eyes softly glowing pale white over the hollow cheeks. The mask is of the Yase-otoko type, and is signed on the back by the maker Iwasaki Hisahito in a carved seal above the eye. Superb craftsmanship!
Iwasaki Hisahito is a well known Mask carver currently 78 years old and still going. He was born in Oita prefecture, but moved to Nagoya then Yokohama at a youthful age. All processes are done by hand, from carving the wood and creating the shape, applying the gofun coating and drawing the hair with a brush then applying lacquer. “What I rely on is the memory of seeing many performances and the feeling of being struck by the many faces." He has created about 500 masks over his more than fifty year career. Having studied under a Noh actor himself, he has tried to create something that makes him think, ``I want to dance in this aspect,'' but no matter how much I try, I am never satisfied. "The more I do it, the more difficult it is. I want to make something that I don't want to give to anyone, even if it's just one aspect of my life."
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1483323 (stock #MOR8096)
The Kura
$500.00
A crimson orb resonates from within the mirror black ground of this gorgeous footed tray enclosed in the original wooden box titled Akebono Moriki (Platter decorated with Dawn) and is signed from the Heian-do Lacquer Studio. The artist has fused the red and black together, the center of the sun-like circle opaque vermillion, the outer edge hazy as it diffuses into the black. The slightly curving basin is raised on a tall wide central foot all in highly polished ro-iro black. It is 36.5 cm (14-1/4 inches) square, 8 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1483851 (stock #MOR8452)
The Kura
$700.00
An exquisite lacquer dish with black Tessen (Clematis) flowers over a mottling of pale layers by Ikeuchi Kaho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Choshitsu Tessen Hana Moyo Kazari-sara. The work is performed by applying layer upon layer of cream-colored lacquer, with a final layer of black, which is then carved through to reveal the lower layers of white, leaving only the one top layer of black as the design. A very labor-intensive process with little room for error. The dish is 30.5 cm (12 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. Ikeuchi Kaho (1903-1967) was an artist in the carved lacquer tradition of Sanuki, and his work is held in the collection of the Takamatsu City Museum.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1483914
The Kura
$2,400.00
Overlapping dragonflies in deep relief cover the black surface of this impressive Natsume by Okabe Keizo enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tsuikoku Natsume (Carved Black Natsume). This is performed in the carved lacquer technique of Kagawa prefecture, where multiple layers of lacquer are applied then carved through leaving the design in releif. A very time consuming process. It is 7.5 cm (3 inches) diameter, the same height and in excellent condition.
Okabe Keizo was born in 1912 in Kagawa prefecture on the island of Shikoku and studied the art of lacquer carving (Tsuishu Yozei) under the important artist Otomaru Kodo (later designated a Living National Treasure. He was awarded at the Japan Art Academy (Nihon Bijutsu-Kyokai) in 1938, and accepted into the Nitten in 1942, garnering several prizes there over the coming years. In 1956 he would be accepted into the National Traditional Crafts Exhibition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1483919
The Kura
$3,400.00
An abstract floral motif is carved through the multiple layers of lacquer forming the surface of this Kanshitsu Dry Lacquer Poem Card Box by 20th century artist Yamada Akio enclosed in the original signed wooden. It is 29.5 x 32.5 x 4 cm (12 x 13 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition. Yamada Akio was a lacquer artist active throughout the mid 20th century. A student of Living National Treasure Otomaru Kodo he was well versed in the art of Sanuki lacquer carving, and exhibited with the Nihon Dento Kogei Ten and Shin Kogeiten where he was awarded in 1988. Kagawa Shiki lacquer from the Island of Shikoku stood largely ignored for much of the 20th century, but has recently received a good deal of attention in retrospect.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1970 item #1477924 (stock #OC007)
The Kura
$550.00
Sale Pending
A modernist form decorated with rich red by Yamazaki Koyo enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled Shinsha Kabin. It is 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamazaki Koyo (1890-1979) was born in Ishikawa prefecture and began in the plastic arts decorating Kutani ware. However, became a pupil of Yamamoto Shunkyo from Kyoto to become a Japanese painter through painting ceramics. He then studied under Kiyomizu Rokubei VI and began creating ceramics in Kyoto in earnest. He was displayed consistently in many National and Local Exhibitions. He has been awarded four times at the Nitten, twice at the Nihon Shin Kogei Ten (Japanese National New Craft Exhibition) as well as the Kofukai and is held in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art Boston and Bern Museum of Art Switzerland among others He is remembered for researching traditional Chinese techniques, Sansai, cinnabar and flambe among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1970 item #1479005
The Kura
sold, thank you
A bronze vase dating from the mid Showa period by Ono Tsuneo of Takaoka enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 26 cm (10 inches) tall and in perfect condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1970 item #1483688
The Kura
$2,200.00
A Te-bako lacquered box by Izumi Atsuhiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated Autumn of Showa 39 (1964). Black and white Urushi with Iro-urushi floral imagery, mother of pearl inlay flowers and gold Ke-uchi embellishments. It is 22.5 x 30.5 x 13 cm (9 x 12 x 5 inches) and in excellent condition, with minor wear on the bottom typical of use.
Izumi Atsuhiko (1915-2005) was born in Niigata prefecture and graduated the Nihon Bijutsu Daigaku University of Arts where he studied Lacquer technique under Rokkakuk Shisui (1867-1950), settling in Tokyo. He exhibited with the Nitten among other National exhibitions as well as abroad.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1970 item #1483741 (stock #MOR8453)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of six anonymous colored lacquer trays decorated with rock garden imagery in lead, mother of pearl and raised lacquer techniques. Each tray is roughly 48 x 27.5 cm (19 x 11 inches) and all are entirely unique, with different colors and designs and in overall excellent condition. Each comes wrapped in a faded blue cloth pouch.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1960 item #1481251
The Kura
$800.00
A wood tray in the shape of a stylized Basho leaf (fruitless banana) carved of dark red wood and signed on the base. It is 27 x 47 cm (11 x 19 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1481726
The Kura
$1,300.00
A striking design of five petaled plum blossoms between dual strips of mother of pearl inset into a rust-colored belt circling the black lacquered body of this art-deco influenced vase dating from the early to mid-20th century. The vessel is turned from a single piece of bamboo, the node still clearly visible inside. It is 31 cm (12 inches) tall, 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. It comes in a contemporary wooden collectors box.
Art Deco arrived in Japan during the Taishō period (1912-1926), a time of increased freedom of expression as well as a tumultuous political era with which bread astounding variety in Japanese culture and design. As Japan sought to modernize and present itself as a global player, the country embraced foreign artistic trends, including Art Deco, which resonated with the aesthetic sensibilities of the era. Art Deco's impact extended to various decorative arts and design disciplines, including furniture, textiles, ceramics, and metalwork. Japanese artisans and designers incorporated Art Deco elements into their works, blending Western aesthetics with traditional Japanese 2-dimensional design and craftsmanship. They integrated geometric patterns, stylized motifs, and streamlined forms into various decorative objects. This blending of styles allowed for the creation of bronze pieces that appealed to both domestic and international audiences. The result was a unique fusion of styles, showcasing the adaptability and creativity of Japanese artists. This fusion of aesthetics resulted in a unique and captivating body of work that continues to be appreciated and admired for its craftsmanship and artistic expression.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1483689
The Kura
$1,500.00
A striking Yellow dry Lacquer (Kanshitsu) Vase by Izumi Atsuhiko enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Truly definitive of the mid-century art scene, it is 17.5 cm (7 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Izumi Atsuhiko (1915-2005) was born in Niigata prefecture and graduated the Nihon Bijutsu Daigaku University of Arts where he studied Lacquer technique under Rokkakuk Shisui (1867-1950), settling in Tokyo. He exhibited with the Nitten among other National exhibitions as well as abroad.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1483690
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A classic mid 20th century Dry-lacquer vase by Kawai Masazo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rankaku (crushed egg shell) on cream colored lacquer alternating with highly polished black. This work truly encapsulates the freedom for form which artists were seeking in the post war period. It is 45 cm long and in excellent condition. Kawai Masazo was born in Osaka in 1928, graduating the Osaka Municipal School of Art and Design. In 1948, at just 20 years old, he was awarded the Mayors Prize at the Osaka Art Exhibition. In 1950 he was first accepted into the Nitten. He would relocate to Tokyo and continue to exhibit and be often awarded at the Nitten, including the Hokutosho in 1963 and 64 and would eventually serve as a juror there. He would also exhibit with the Gendai Kogeiten National Modern Crafts Exhibition where he would also garner several prizes and serve on the committee.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1950 item #1480953
The Kura
$800.00
Two shishi roughhousing, one sinking his teeth into the others back a glass ball balanced on the furled tail signed on the base Taiho. The upper creatures head can be removd allowing the pair to be used as an incense burner. It is 17 x 12 x 17 cm (7 x 5 x 7 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shishi guardians, also known as Komainu or "lion dogs," have a long history in Japanese art and culture; iconic figures often depicted in pairs and placed at the entrances of shrines, temples, and other important structures to ward off evil spirits and protect against negative energies. The origins of the Shishi can be found in ancient Chinese culture, specifically the mythical creature known as the "shi" or "foo dog" in English. These creatures were believed to have protective qualities and were commonly depicted in Chinese art and architecture. As Buddhism spread to Japan from China in the 6th century, so too did the imagery of the lion guardians. The artistic representation of Shishi lion guardians in Japan evolved into a unique style. The sculptures typically depict a pair of lion-like creatures with fierce expressions, large manes, and muscular bodies. One lion has an open mouth to represent the sound "ah," which is believed to expel negative energy, while the other has a closed mouth to represent the sound "um," which is believed to retain positive energy. This duality symbolizes the balance between yin and yang, and the harmony between opposing forces.