The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Contemporary item #1492480 (stock #K065)
The Kura
$750.00
A Fine modernist vase by master of the Japanese bronze tradition, world renowned Hasuda Shugoro, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seido Tsubo, Shajiku (Pure Bronze Vase, Hub). The contemporary belted form is finished with matte olive patination. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 19 cm (just under 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The box is dated on the side an auspicious day in the 4th month of Heisei 8 (1996).
Hasuda Shugoro was born in Kanazawa City in 1915. After graduating the Ishikawa Prefectural Industrial School, he moved to the Tokyo School of Art. Much lauded his first award was at the 5th Nitten in 1949 and he received the Hokuto-sho there in 1953 among many further prizes. He participated in the founding of the Creative Crafts Association in 1961 and founded the Japan Metal Sculpture Institute in 1976. Decorated with the Order of Cultural Merit in 1991, Hasuda Shugoro stands as one of the leading modernist artists working in bronze during the Post-War Period. A vase by the artist sold at Christies in 2012 for 2,500 pounds (roughly 4,000 dollars). For more on this artist see Hasuda Shugoro Kinzoku Zokei (1981).
All Items : Artists : Paintings : Contemporary item #1492941 (stock #K098)
The Kura
$300.00
Sale Pending
An exploration of color by Nagoya based artist Hamada Juri mounted in a gold frame titled Chi no Hana (Earth Flower). The frame is 33.5 x 33.5 x 5cm, the painted disk is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, and all is in excellent condition.
Hamada Juri was born in Indonesia in 1973, and graduated the Aichi Prefectural University of Art in 1997 (The graduation art Submission was awarded ad purchased by the University). Two years later Juri graduated advanced studies at the same university, and that piece too was collected. In 2010 Juri was awarded the New artist prize by Nagoya City, and was again awarded in 2012. That same year received the Higashiyama Kai Taisho prize, and in 2013 the Aichi prefectural Culture award. Work is held in the Aichi Prefectural Museum, Hiratsuka Museum of Art, Takahashi Ryutaro collection and the aforementioned Aichi Prefectural Art University among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1481801
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite hand-formed koro, the tri-legged form hammered from a single sheet of copper gilded with gold and signed on the base Goro. The top is created in the same manner pierced with three holes, and it has an insert of the same alloy to keep heat away from the softly gleaming body. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Uchidashi is a traditional Japanese metalworking technique that involves hammering or embossing designs onto the surface of metal objects. This technique is often used to create intricate patterns, textures, and relief designs on various metal objects, such as armor. Taking it to the extreme, and entire three dimensional object such as a koro or animal figurine, can be hammered out from a single plate of metal. Uchidashi is a labor-intensive technique that requires a high level of skill, precision, and artistic creativity. It has been traditionally used in the creation of decorative and functional metal objects. This technique showcases the mastery of Japanese metal craftsmen and their ability to turn simple pieces of metal into intricate works of art.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491692 (stock #K003)
The Kura
$2,600.00
A stellar modernist form with of cast bronze by Yamamuro Hyakusei in the form of a droplet splashing up as it hits the liquid surface. It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 34.5cm (13-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in a custom kiri-wood collector’s box and is signed on the base Hyakusei.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist born in Toyama prefecture. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491693 (stock #K004)
The Kura
$1,800.00
A second brilliant Modernist Vase by Yamamuro Hyakusei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Akatsuki (dawn). It is 24.5 cm (just les than 10 inches) diameter, 20cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist from the Showa to early Heisei eras. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1990 item #1492453 (stock #K066)
The Kura
$800.00
A cocoon shaped basket of tight weave with bamboo insert made for wall hanging by Maeda Chikubosai II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kake Kaki (Hanging Flower Receptacle). It is roughly 16 cm (6 plus inches) diameter, 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Maeda Chikubosai II (1917-2003), was born when his father, Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was already quite mature. Initially he studied plaiting techniques from younger artists in the family studio, and once mastered studied under his father, and Yamamoto Chikuryosai I (Shoen), becoming an independent artist in 1941 and succeeding to the Chikubosai name in 1950. He was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition in 1953, and exhibited there consistently as well as in the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten). He was honored by the Japanese government in 1992, and was named a Living National Treasure for the bamboo crafts in 1995. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #1482363
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite image of an emaciated man, the prominent bones about the eyes softly glowing pale white over the hollow cheeks. The mask is of the Yase-otoko type, and is signed on the back by the maker Iwasaki Hisahito in a carved seal above the eye. Superb craftsmanship!
Iwasaki Hisahito is a well known Mask carver currently 78 years old and still going. He was born in Oita prefecture, but moved to Nagoya then Yokohama at a youthful age. All processes are done by hand, from carving the wood and creating the shape, applying the gofun coating and drawing the hair with a brush then applying lacquer. “What I rely on is the memory of seeing many performances and the feeling of being struck by the many faces." He has created about 500 masks over his more than fifty year career. Having studied under a Noh actor himself, he has tried to create something that makes him think, ``I want to dance in this aspect,'' but no matter how much I try, I am never satisfied. "The more I do it, the more difficult it is. I want to make something that I don't want to give to anyone, even if it's just one aspect of my life."
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1484141
The Kura
sold, thank you
Coxcomb decorates the deeply carved surface of this box covered in green and red lacquer outside, gilded with gold inside in the Kamakura-bori carving tradition. It is 22 x 25 x 5 cm and comes enclosed in a period wooden box. Kamakura-bori is a type of lacquer ware made in the area around the ancient capital city of Kamakura in Kanagawa prefecture. The tradition is based on carved lacquer wares imported from China during the Kamakura era. However, many Japanese lacquer craftsmen did not adopt the Chinese method of layering lacquer and then carving it; instead, they created Kamakura-bori, a method of carving wood and then coating the already prepared surface with lacquer. Initially, sculptors of Buddhist ritual implements and temple carpenters that were influenced by Chinese art works started to carve items made of Japanese Judas tree or ginkgo and applied a lacquer finish to the pieces in order to mass-produce Buddhist altar fittings resembling carved Chinese lacquer without the extensive drying time. This style came to be known as Kamakura-bori, or literally Kamakura Carving, and the adoption of traditional Japanese patterns made the technique unique to the island nation. Kamakura-bori features chisel markings left intentionally to accentuate patterned areas. Another unique technique is to sprinkle black ink on a vermilion lacquered surface, then polish down the highlights in order for the patterns to stand out from the darkened background. The carving and lacquering techniques of Kamakura-bori have evolved for the past 800 years. Today, production has spread to include everyday goods as well.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1485955
The Kura
sold, thank you
An unusual woven basket of bamboo strips and roots in the shape of a cocoon or bird nest dating from the 20th century. It can be used flat on a table or even better suspended on the wall or pillar. It is 43 cm (17 inches) long and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489298 (stock #L122)
The Kura
$650.00
Water streams between the verdant hills on this lurid landscape by 20th century artist Shimizu Hian. Ink on paper completely remounted in silk with black lacquer rollers. The poem reads: Hana chirite Arui ha, Samuki hi mo arinu, Haru no Yukue no shizuka nari keru (Early flowers have fallen and the cold lingers, nonetheless Spring quietly approaches). It is 63 x 129 cm (25 x 51 inches) and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489358
The Kura
sold, thank you
3 robed figures appear decidedly relaxed on the edge of a rock-strewn river lost in dark mountains. Above a poem reads:
Furusato ha Arukiteyukeru Tokoro ni-te, Yama ari, Mizu ari, kataru yuujin ari (Walking through my home(town) I find mountains, water and friends for conversation).
Ink on paper bordered in patterned silk with bone rollers. It is 59 x 129 cm (23 x 51 inches) and is in overall fine condition, with some toning due to age. Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1489359
The Kura
sold, thank you
A very rare Mashiko platter by Living National Treasure Hamada Shoji decorated with a poem cradled in an offset ring forming the mika-tsuki or third day moon by poet Shimizu Hian. The poem reads: Akaki Mi no Omoto no Hotori Dainaru Maruki kono yo no ishi okitari, and is signed by the 76 year old man Hian meaning it was made either in 1958 or 59 (depending upon whether Hian was going by the Western or Japanese manner of counting age). It is 35.5 cm (14 inches) diameter and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a wooden box signed by Hamada’s son.
Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. He was a significant influence on studio pottery of the twentieth century, and a driving force of the mingei folk-art movement. In 1955 he was designated a "Living National Treasure". There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1492240 (stock #K042)
The Kura
$650.00
A spiraling form in softly gleaming golden brown by Yajima Boshu enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled simply Jundo Kabin (Pure Bronze Vase). It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 27.5 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base with a silver cartouche.
Yajima Boshu (1925-2001) was born in Takaoka, one of the most important bronze producing regions in Japan. He was first exhibited at the 13th National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten) in 1966, and exhibited consistently with that venue. He received top prize in 1968 at the 7th Toyama Traditional Crafts Exhibition. He exhibited at the 1st National Traditional Ne Metal Artist Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kinko Shinsaku-ten) and was awarded top prize there in both 1973 and 1974, the start of a highly lauded career.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1492876 (stock #K083)
The Kura
$700.00
Pink, purple and red glazes mingle on the surface of this Mizusashi water jar by Matsuyama Gae enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kujaku-yu Mizusashi and signed inside the lid by the Urasenke Konnichi-an Grand Tea Master, Sen Genshitsu. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Gae I Returned from China in 1945, where he had been posted for eight years and had studied in depth ancient Chinese ceramics. In 1947 he opened his own kiln and immediately won acclaim, as well as the Mayors award for Kobe in 1948. Working together with his wife they developed this glaze through trial and error in 1951. Several pieces were collected by the Imperial Household agency in 1953 and 1954, and a vase was sent as a gift to then President Eisenhower in 1960. During this time they received many awards and presented at a great many exhibitions. Gae died in 1963 of cancer, and after one year of mourning, Tsutako continued the name and work. She continued to exhibit and was again accepted into the Imperial collection in 1964, and was also featured at the World Exposition in 1970 held in Osaka. When she passes away her daughter continued the family tradition, becoming the third and last Matsuyama Gae. Sen Genshitsu was born in Kyoto on April 19, 1923, as the first son of the 14th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Mugensai. His given name was Masaoki. He served as Urasenke Iemoto for thirty-eight years, up to the end of 2002, when he transferred the title and the hereditary name Soshitsu that goes with it to his eldest son, Zabosai. At that time, he changed his own name from Soshitsu to Genshitsu, and he became referred to by the title Daisosho, signifying his status as the once grand master. After serving as a pilot in the Airforce division of the Japanese navy during WWII, and then completing his temporarily interrupted university education at Doshisha University, Kyoto, graduating from the Faculty of Economics, he took Buddhist vows under Goto Zuigan, chief abbot of Daitokuji temple, and received the Buddhist names Hounsai Genshu Soko. In 1950, he was confirmed as heir apparent of Mugensai, and thus became referred to by the title Wakasosho. He made his first trip abroad that year, to Hawaii and the USA, and since then he has made more than three hundred trips abroad and been to more than sixty countries. He lived in Hawaii in 1952, during which time he lectured at and also took courses at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, beginning his long and dedicated association with that university. Upon Mugensai’s death in 1964, he succeeded as the 15th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Hounsai. He is widely known as a global-minded promoter both of the culture embraced by the Way of Tea and of World Peace. Among his many awards and recognitions, in 1997, he was awarded the Order of Culture by the Emperor of Japan.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1483690
The Kura
sold, thank you
A classic mid 20th century Dry-lacquer vase by Kawai Masazo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rankaku (crushed egg shell) on cream colored lacquer alternating with highly polished black. This work truly encapsulates the freedom for form which artists were seeking in the post war period. It is 45 cm long and in excellent condition. Kawai Masazo was born in Osaka in 1928, graduating the Osaka Municipal School of Art and Design. In 1948, at just 20 years old, he was awarded the Mayors Prize at the Osaka Art Exhibition. In 1950 he was first accepted into the Nitten. He would relocate to Tokyo and continue to exhibit and be often awarded at the Nitten, including the Hokutosho in 1963 and 64 and would eventually serve as a juror there. He would also exhibit with the Gendai Kogeiten National Modern Crafts Exhibition where he would also garner several prizes and serve on the committee.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492087 (stock #K030)
The Kura
$470.00
A narrow open-mouthed vessel decorated with autumnal trees by Ito Tozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The piece could serve as a vase, but comes with a black lacquered wooden lid and is titled Mizusashi, making it rightfully a fresh water jar for the Japanese Tea Ceremony. It is 11.7 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition, likely dating from the 1950s.
Ito Tozan I (1846-1920) began as a painter in the Maruyama school studying under Koizumi Togaku. In 1862 he became a pupil of Kameya Kyokutei, as well as studying under Takahashi Dohachi III and Kanzan Denshichi (who made the dishes for the imperial table). In 1867, with the fall of the Edo government, he opened his kiln in Eastern Kyoto. Much prized at home, he was also recognized abroad at the Amsterdam, Paris and Chicago World Expositions. With an emphasis on Awata and Asahi wares of Kyoto, he began to use the name Tozan around 1895. In 1917 he was named a member of the Imperial Art Academy, one of only five potters ever given that title, and like his teacher Denshichi, created the dishes from which the Imperial family would eat. He worked very closely with his adopted son, Ito Tozan II (1871-1937). He too began life as a painter, but his talent was seen by Tozan I, who adopted him and converted him to pottery, where he both succeeded and excelled as a member of one of Kyotos most well known pottery families. Miki Hyoetsu I was born in 1877, establishing a line of craftsman which lasts to this day. He was exhibited at the Shotoku Taishi Ten and Paris World Exposition among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1492125 (stock #K041)
The Kura
$1,100.00
A large vase decorated with an expansive ancient pine by Kawamoto Rekitei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 27 cm (10-3/4 inches) diameter, 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawamoto Rekitei was born in Aichi prefecture, home of Seto-yaki and a long standing important production center for Japanese Sometsuke porcelains. In 1914, at the very young age of 20, he received the top prize at then National Ceramics Exhibition (Tojiki Hin Hyou Kai and later (1922) received the gold prize at the Peace Exposition. His works were featured at the Paris, San Francisco and Chicago World Expositions. He was contracted by the Japanese government in 1948 to create a vase for presentation to President Truman, and his work graces the collection of the Imperial Household. In 1972 he was named an Important Cultural Property of Aichi Prefecture (Ken Shitei Mukei Bunkazai). He was survived by his son, Kawamoto Goro, and grandson, Kawamoto Taro
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492756 (stock #K062)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Grain rises majestically on the surface of this pale vase by pioneering female potter Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mugi-mon Hanaire. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491938 (stock #N17)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A vibrant image of a paradisaical island over which soar white cranes by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Horai Senkyo-zu. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name. It is performed with pigment on silk in a fine silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It is 145 x 65.5㎝ (57 x 26 inches) and is in excellent original condition. A similar scene on two six panel screens spread across 24 feet is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491939 (stock #N18)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A lonely figure walks home through the forested hills, a rustic scene by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) from his mature period distinctly blending his early years of training in watercolor under Ishii Hakutei with his later Nanga years. Ink and light color on silk in a superb silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It comes in the original signed double wood box titled Kisho (returning home) and is in excellent condition. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1950 item #1492336 (stock #K052)
The Kura
Sale Pending
A set of two incense items carved from blocks of dried lacquer, the surfaces polished to reveal the various layers and colors of lacquer used in a mottled pattern. Truly quite spectacular despite their diminutive size, the koro is 10 x 6 x 7.5 cm (4 x 2-1/4 x 3 inches), the kogo is 4 cm (1-1/2 inches) diameter and both are in excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1470055 (stock #O005)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A solitary thatched hermitage rises on the top of this stony crag set onto a beautifully carved and signed rosewood stand. Together they are 7.5 x 11.5 x 13 cm (3 x 4-1/2 x 5 inches) and in excellent condition. The box is titled Yasegawa-ishi, inside signed Seicho and dated a fortunate day in the second month of 1936.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1940 item #1470209
The Kura
sold, thank you
Toast the new years with this solid silver sake set made for celebrations. 3 solid silver cups, as well as a beautifully shaped silver sake kettle with lid, each piece bearing the jun-gin (Pure or 100 percent silver) mark. They come enclosed in a wooden box titled Jungin-sei Shuki (Solid Silver Sake Set). The kettle is 13 cm diameter, 18 cm wide at the spout. The largest cup is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter. In total the set weighs 757 grams, or 1.65 pounds of pure silver!
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1470786 (stock #TCR7109)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A dynamic early porcelain work in vivid color by Kiyomizu Rokubei VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Futatsuki Kajutu Mon Kashiki (Sweets dish decorated with fruit) bearing his real name, indicating it predates his taking the name Rokubei in 1945. The box bears the seal of the Hattori Tokeiten, purveyors of fine art in Pre-war Japan. The porcelain is 19.7 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, signed on the bottom.
The Kiyomizu family potters managed one of the most productive workshops in Kyoto’s Gojozaka district throughout the second half of the Edo period. From the Meiji they began producing tableware for export and special pieces for government-sponsored exhibitions under Rokubei IV. Rokubei V led the kiln into the 20th century, and his son, Rokubei VI (1901-1980), would assume lead in 1945, taking the kiln through the tumultuous years after the Second World War. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, then the Kyoto Special School of Painting, before apprenticing under his father in 1925. He exhibited frequently and was often prized at the National Bunten, Teiten and Nitten Exhibits, where he later served as judge. He was also lauded abroad, in the USSR, France, Italy, Belgium and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy. In 1976 he was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit for his lifelong devotion to promoting Japanese pottery traditions. His works are held in numerous museums throughout the globe.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1472306 (stock #OC055)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted image of a pheasant by Ogawa Yuhei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 37 cm long and in excellent condition.
Yuhei Ogawa (1885-1945) was born in Takamatsu, Okayama prefecture an came to pottery a bit later than most. In 1923, while working part time at the Naval Hydrographic Department, he was deeply moved by seeing the solo exhibition of ceramic sculptor Kazumasa Numata. This gave him impetus to begin sculpting in his free time. Although he started his career as an artist late at the age of 37, he was selected for the opening exhibition of the newly established arts and crafts department at the Teiten National Exhibition in 1927, and frequently thereafter. He participated in the activities of the Totokai, a group of potters living in the Kanto region, with Itaya Hazan, Numata Kazumasa and Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan II serving as advisors, and played an active role as a central artist. In 1934 he was invited to Iwaki Glass Factory as an advisor and created pottery sculptures and glass works for the rest of his life. A sculpture of a black panther is held in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1485801
The Kura
sold, thank you
The cormorant prepares to take flight, wings extended, captured in bronze in a moment of excitement, the shapr eyes focused ahead. Captivating realism with simple Art-deco overtones signed below the tail. It is 32 x 36.5 x 25 cm (14-1/2 x 13 x 10 inches) and is in excellent condition. The cormorant, known in Japanese simply as U, is a migratory bird native to the east Palearctic with a range from Taiwan to the Russian Far East. It has a black body with a white throat and cheeks and a partially yellow bill. It is one of the species of cormorant that has been domesticated by fishermen in a tradition known in Japan as ukai. This method of fishing is often depicted in art and is now a popular tourist attraction during the brief Ukai season.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1491782 (stock #N13-16)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of four large scrolls depicting seasonal landscapes by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed double wood box exhibited at the 1936 Nangain-Ten and published in the book Shirakura Niho (page 127 figures 102-107). Ink & Light color on Paper in fine silk mountings, they have been completely cleaned and restored to original perfect condition retaining the original cloth by Kitaoka Hyboido of Kyoto. Each scroll is 66 x 138.5 cm (26 x 54-1/2 inches). A copy of the museum book and our catalog will accompany the set.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1940 item #1492918 (stock #K090)
The Kura
$4,900.00
A beautifully crafted basket by Tanabe Chikuunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hirokuchi Senshu-ami Hanakago (Wide Mouthed Senshu-weave Basket). It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 35 cm (14 inches) tall and retains the original bamboo insert. A similar basket is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1492991 (stock #K079)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Seasonal Grasses and flowers blossom all about the cream colored surface of this slightly belted vessel by Kiyoizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gohon Akigusa Mizusashi (Water Jar with Autumn Flora on Fawn-spotted Glaze). It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 14 cm tall (just less than 5 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493135 (stock #K082)
The Kura
$545.00
Sale Pending
A glass Bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the very rare original signed wooden box titled Ryomimitsuki Kajutsumori (Fruit Dish with Two Handles). Inside the box lid is written: For the 2nd Emerging Glass Solo Exhibition Held at Takashimaya in the Early Summer of 1936. It is 28×24 x 8 cm (11 x 9-3/4 x 3 inches) and is in excellent condition. Acquiring a piece by Toshichi with such detail about its past is a decidedly rare opportunity.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493137 (stock #K080)
The Kura
$450.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful early footed bowl of colored glass with sweeping clear glass handles by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the rare original signed wooden box titled Sango-Iro Garasu Hachi (Coral Colored Glass Bowl). It is 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter, 14cm tall (5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, bearing the artist seal in gold on the base.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493138 (stock #K081)
The Kura
$495.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful dark plum colored glass bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Glass Bowl and dating from the 1920s to 30s. Attesting to its early origins, it bears the artist stamp on the base, which is rarely seen later. It is roughly 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 7 cm (just less than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1469252 (stock #OC066)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite set of small petaled-plates, each wafer thin, with a floral spray of yagiku (wild chrysanthemum) in a blue dial in the center by Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kiku-gata Kozara, Jukyaku (10 Chrysanthemum Shaped Small Dishes) dating from the 1920s. The design is Japanese, the decoration is strongly influenced by Korean wares. Each is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan Torako was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1469548 (stock #OC056)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A waka poem in underglaze blue brushed by female artist/poet Tomioka Haruko decorates this porcelain Mizusashi by female potter Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The porcelain container is 17.5 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall, 11.5 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. On the base it bears the circular mark of Suwa Sozan II and on the side the verse is singed Haruko 80. From this we can surmise it dates from 1926 when Haruko was 80 by Japanese count.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan Torako (Suwa Sozan II 1890–1977) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
Tomioka Haruko (1847-1940) was born as the third daughter of Sasaki Yoshimitsu, a feudal lord of Ozu. She was taken in as the third wife of Tomioka Tessai—who later became known as a leading figure in modern Japanese painting—when she was 26 years old in 1872. She was well known for her poetry, calligraphy, and sparse paintings.