The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
$600.00
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Contemporary item #1492480 (stock #K065)
The Kura
$750.00
A Fine modernist vase by master of the Japanese bronze tradition, world renowned Hasuda Shugoro, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seido Tsubo, Shajiku (Pure Bronze Vase, Hub). The contemporary belted form is finished with matte olive patination. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 19 cm (just under 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The box is dated on the side an auspicious day in the 4th month of Heisei 8 (1996).
Hasuda Shugoro was born in Kanazawa City in 1915. After graduating the Ishikawa Prefectural Industrial School, he moved to the Tokyo School of Art. Much lauded his first award was at the 5th Nitten in 1949 and he received the Hokuto-sho there in 1953 among many further prizes. He participated in the founding of the Creative Crafts Association in 1961 and founded the Japan Metal Sculpture Institute in 1976. Decorated with the Order of Cultural Merit in 1991, Hasuda Shugoro stands as one of the leading modernist artists working in bronze during the Post-War Period. A vase by the artist sold at Christies in 2012 for 2,500 pounds (roughly 4,000 dollars). For more on this artist see Hasuda Shugoro Kinzoku Zokei (1981).
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1481801
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite hand-formed koro, the tri-legged form hammered from a single sheet of copper gilded with gold and signed on the base Goro. The top is created in the same manner pierced with three holes, and it has an insert of the same alloy to keep heat away from the softly gleaming body. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Uchidashi is a traditional Japanese metalworking technique that involves hammering or embossing designs onto the surface of metal objects. This technique is often used to create intricate patterns, textures, and relief designs on various metal objects, such as armor. Taking it to the extreme, and entire three dimensional object such as a koro or animal figurine, can be hammered out from a single plate of metal. Uchidashi is a labor-intensive technique that requires a high level of skill, precision, and artistic creativity. It has been traditionally used in the creation of decorative and functional metal objects. This technique showcases the mastery of Japanese metal craftsmen and their ability to turn simple pieces of metal into intricate works of art.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491692 (stock #K003)
The Kura
$2,600.00
A stellar modernist form with of cast bronze by Yamamuro Hyakusei in the form of a droplet splashing up as it hits the liquid surface. It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 34.5cm (13-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in a custom kiri-wood collector’s box and is signed on the base Hyakusei.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist born in Toyama prefecture. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491693 (stock #K004)
The Kura
$1,800.00
A second brilliant Modernist Vase by Yamamuro Hyakusei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Akatsuki (dawn). It is 24.5 cm (just les than 10 inches) diameter, 20cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist from the Showa to early Heisei eras. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1990 item #1492453 (stock #K066)
The Kura
$800.00
A cocoon shaped basket of tight weave with bamboo insert made for wall hanging by Maeda Chikubosai II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kake Kaki (Hanging Flower Receptacle). It is roughly 16 cm (6 plus inches) diameter, 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Maeda Chikubosai II (1917-2003), was born when his father, Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was already quite mature. Initially he studied plaiting techniques from younger artists in the family studio, and once mastered studied under his father, and Yamamoto Chikuryosai I (Shoen), becoming an independent artist in 1941 and succeeding to the Chikubosai name in 1950. He was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition in 1953, and exhibited there consistently as well as in the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten). He was honored by the Japanese government in 1992, and was named a Living National Treasure for the bamboo crafts in 1995. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #1482363
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite image of an emaciated man, the prominent bones about the eyes softly glowing pale white over the hollow cheeks. The mask is of the Yase-otoko type, and is signed on the back by the maker Iwasaki Hisahito in a carved seal above the eye. Superb craftsmanship!
Iwasaki Hisahito is a well known Mask carver currently 78 years old and still going. He was born in Oita prefecture, but moved to Nagoya then Yokohama at a youthful age. All processes are done by hand, from carving the wood and creating the shape, applying the gofun coating and drawing the hair with a brush then applying lacquer. “What I rely on is the memory of seeing many performances and the feeling of being struck by the many faces." He has created about 500 masks over his more than fifty year career. Having studied under a Noh actor himself, he has tried to create something that makes him think, ``I want to dance in this aspect,'' but no matter how much I try, I am never satisfied. "The more I do it, the more difficult it is. I want to make something that I don't want to give to anyone, even if it's just one aspect of my life."
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1484141
The Kura
sold, thank you
Coxcomb decorates the deeply carved surface of this box covered in green and red lacquer outside, gilded with gold inside in the Kamakura-bori carving tradition. It is 22 x 25 x 5 cm and comes enclosed in a period wooden box. Kamakura-bori is a type of lacquer ware made in the area around the ancient capital city of Kamakura in Kanagawa prefecture. The tradition is based on carved lacquer wares imported from China during the Kamakura era. However, many Japanese lacquer craftsmen did not adopt the Chinese method of layering lacquer and then carving it; instead, they created Kamakura-bori, a method of carving wood and then coating the already prepared surface with lacquer. Initially, sculptors of Buddhist ritual implements and temple carpenters that were influenced by Chinese art works started to carve items made of Japanese Judas tree or ginkgo and applied a lacquer finish to the pieces in order to mass-produce Buddhist altar fittings resembling carved Chinese lacquer without the extensive drying time. This style came to be known as Kamakura-bori, or literally Kamakura Carving, and the adoption of traditional Japanese patterns made the technique unique to the island nation. Kamakura-bori features chisel markings left intentionally to accentuate patterned areas. Another unique technique is to sprinkle black ink on a vermilion lacquered surface, then polish down the highlights in order for the patterns to stand out from the darkened background. The carving and lacquering techniques of Kamakura-bori have evolved for the past 800 years. Today, production has spread to include everyday goods as well.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1485955
The Kura
sold, thank you
An unusual woven basket of bamboo strips and roots in the shape of a cocoon or bird nest dating from the 20th century. It can be used flat on a table or even better suspended on the wall or pillar. It is 43 cm (17 inches) long and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489298 (stock #L122)
The Kura
$650.00
Water streams between the verdant hills on this lurid landscape by 20th century artist Shimizu Hian. Ink on paper completely remounted in silk with black lacquer rollers. The poem reads: Hana chirite Arui ha, Samuki hi mo arinu, Haru no Yukue no shizuka nari keru (Early flowers have fallen and the cold lingers, nonetheless Spring quietly approaches). It is 63 x 129 cm (25 x 51 inches) and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489358
The Kura
sold, thank you
3 robed figures appear decidedly relaxed on the edge of a rock-strewn river lost in dark mountains. Above a poem reads:
Furusato ha Arukiteyukeru Tokoro ni-te, Yama ari, Mizu ari, kataru yuujin ari (Walking through my home(town) I find mountains, water and friends for conversation).
Ink on paper bordered in patterned silk with bone rollers. It is 59 x 129 cm (23 x 51 inches) and is in overall fine condition, with some toning due to age. Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1489359
The Kura
sold, thank you
A very rare Mashiko platter by Living National Treasure Hamada Shoji decorated with a poem cradled in an offset ring forming the mika-tsuki or third day moon by poet Shimizu Hian. The poem reads: Akaki Mi no Omoto no Hotori Dainaru Maruki kono yo no ishi okitari, and is signed by the 76 year old man Hian meaning it was made either in 1958 or 59 (depending upon whether Hian was going by the Western or Japanese manner of counting age). It is 35.5 cm (14 inches) diameter and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a wooden box signed by Hamada’s son.
Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. He was a significant influence on studio pottery of the twentieth century, and a driving force of the mingei folk-art movement. In 1955 he was designated a "Living National Treasure". There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Enamel : Pre 1980 item #1491936 (stock #K005)
The Kura
$2,500.00
A staggeringly beautiful set of unique Cloisonne vases featuring opposing designs of red flowers on white and white flowers on red. Each is roughly 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 36.5 cm (14-1/2 inches) tall and are both in excellent condition, enclosed in a compartmentalized kiri-wood collector’s box dating from the middle of the 20th century.
Japanese cloisonné, known as "shippo-yaki" in Japanese, has a rich history dating back to ancient times, but it particularly flourished during the Meiji period (1868-1912). Cloisonné is an ancient technique of decorating objects, typically made of copper or bronze, with colored enamel. The origins of cloisonné in Japan can be traced back to the Nara period (710-794), when the technique was introduced from China and Korea. However, it was during the late 19th century that Japanese cloisonné gained international recognition. During the Meiji period, Japan underwent rapid modernization and industrialization. As part of this process, the Japanese government actively promoted traditional crafts as a means of showcasing Japanese culture to the world. Cloisonné was one of the crafts that experienced a revival during this time. Japanese cloisonné became extremely popular in Europe and the United States during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It was exhibited at world's fairs and international exhibitions, where it received acclaim for its exquisite craftsmanship and intricate designs.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1492240 (stock #K042)
The Kura
$650.00
A spiraling form in softly gleaming golden brown by Yajima Boshu enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled simply Jundo Kabin (Pure Bronze Vase). It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 27.5 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base with a silver cartouche.
Yajima Boshu (1925-2001) was born in Takaoka, one of the most important bronze producing regions in Japan. He was first exhibited at the 13th National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten) in 1966, and exhibited consistently with that venue. He received top prize in 1968 at the 7th Toyama Traditional Crafts Exhibition. He exhibited at the 1st National Traditional Ne Metal Artist Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kinko Shinsaku-ten) and was awarded top prize there in both 1973 and 1974, the start of a highly lauded career.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Sale Pending
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1483690
The Kura
sold, thank you
A classic mid 20th century Dry-lacquer vase by Kawai Masazo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rankaku (crushed egg shell) on cream colored lacquer alternating with highly polished black. This work truly encapsulates the freedom for form which artists were seeking in the post war period. It is 45 cm long and in excellent condition. Kawai Masazo was born in Osaka in 1928, graduating the Osaka Municipal School of Art and Design. In 1948, at just 20 years old, he was awarded the Mayors Prize at the Osaka Art Exhibition. In 1950 he was first accepted into the Nitten. He would relocate to Tokyo and continue to exhibit and be often awarded at the Nitten, including the Hokutosho in 1963 and 64 and would eventually serve as a juror there. He would also exhibit with the Gendai Kogeiten National Modern Crafts Exhibition where he would also garner several prizes and serve on the committee.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492087 (stock #K030)
The Kura
$470.00
A narrow open-mouthed vessel decorated with autumnal trees by Ito Tozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The piece could serve as a vase, but comes with a black lacquered wooden lid and is titled Mizusashi, making it rightfully a fresh water jar for the Japanese Tea Ceremony. It is 11.7 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition, likely dating from the 1950s.
Ito Tozan I (1846-1920) began as a painter in the Maruyama school studying under Koizumi Togaku. In 1862 he became a pupil of Kameya Kyokutei, as well as studying under Takahashi Dohachi III and Kanzan Denshichi (who made the dishes for the imperial table). In 1867, with the fall of the Edo government, he opened his kiln in Eastern Kyoto. Much prized at home, he was also recognized abroad at the Amsterdam, Paris and Chicago World Expositions. With an emphasis on Awata and Asahi wares of Kyoto, he began to use the name Tozan around 1895. In 1917 he was named a member of the Imperial Art Academy, one of only five potters ever given that title, and like his teacher Denshichi, created the dishes from which the Imperial family would eat. He worked very closely with his adopted son, Ito Tozan II (1871-1937). He too began life as a painter, but his talent was seen by Tozan I, who adopted him and converted him to pottery, where he both succeeded and excelled as a member of one of Kyotos most well known pottery families. Miki Hyoetsu I was born in 1877, establishing a line of craftsman which lasts to this day. He was exhibited at the Shotoku Taishi Ten and Paris World Exposition among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1492125 (stock #K041)
The Kura
$1,100.00
A large vase decorated with an expansive ancient pine by Kawamoto Rekitei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 27 cm (10-3/4 inches) diameter, 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawamoto Rekitei was born in Aichi prefecture, home of Seto-yaki and a long standing important production center for Japanese Sometsuke porcelains. In 1914, at the very young age of 20, he received the top prize at then National Ceramics Exhibition (Tojiki Hin Hyou Kai and later (1922) received the gold prize at the Peace Exposition. His works were featured at the Paris, San Francisco and Chicago World Expositions. He was contracted by the Japanese government in 1948 to create a vase for presentation to President Truman, and his work graces the collection of the Imperial Household. In 1972 he was named an Important Cultural Property of Aichi Prefecture (Ken Shitei Mukei Bunkazai). He was survived by his son, Kawamoto Goro, and grandson, Kawamoto Taro