The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1478458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully turned bowl lacquered burnt orange-red over a black foot dating from the late 19th to early 20th century enclosed in an old kiri wood box titled Negoro-nuri Kashiki followed by a signature. The faintest brush strokes in perfect lines swirl around the outside, and cross the bowl inside. The bowl itself is also signed in red on the base. It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1481896
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautiful black Raku bowl with golden lightning splitting across the surface like an eruption of light in the night sky. It is roughly 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. An exquisite repair.
Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483162
The Kura
sold, thank you
The title does not lie, this is one against which all others might be measured. A celebratory sake set consisting of three cups and a stand enclosed in their original lacquered wooden boxes. The cups are over the top, decorated with plum pine and bamboo in taka-maki-e gold over red replete with bits of kirigane gold and ke-uchi details. The cups are equally gorgeous on top and bottom, the design extending even inside the foot ring. Roundels of the same designs are built up in gold and lacquer maki-e on the black lacquered stand, the inside of which is covered in Togidashi Nashiji. Along the edge of the stand are carefully placed bits of gold in a technique known as oki-hirame. The stand is 17 x 17 x 14.2 cm (6-3/4 x 6-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches). The cups are 9.8 cm (4 inches) 11.2 cm (4-1/2 inches) and 12.7 cm (5 inches) diameter respectively, and all are in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483360 (stock #MOR7073)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A splendid set of five Chataku Tea Cup Saucers of turned wood decorated in ridiculously thick lacquer floral decoration by Ikkokusai enclosed in a fine wooden box signed by the artist and dated Meiji 39 (1906). Accompanying is a note stating the set was received as a gift upon visiting the Naganuma Ryokan during a trip to Hiroshima in the fifth month of Meiji 43, accompanied by the name Kayanomiyasama. Kaya-no-miya were a collateral branch of the Japanese Imperial family. There is a photograph in the collection of the Hiroshima Peace Museum commemorating an Imperial visit (meeting school children) dated the fifth month of Meiji 43 taken in front of the Naganuma Ryokan. Each Chataku is 13.5 x 11 cm (5-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches) and all are in excellent condition, each uniquely signed on the base.
Ikkokusai I (1777-1852) was born in Ise, Mie prefecture, and was trained in the lacquer arts in Osaka. His talent was recognized and in 1811 he was taken as an official artist of the Tokugawa Clan, relatives of the Shogun and Feudal lords of Owari near present day Nagoya. All three of his sons would take the name Ikkokusai, His first son, (true name Nakamura Yoshiyuki), would settle in Osaka, and works he made were presented at the first National Industrial Art Exhibition (Naikoku Sangyo Hakurankai) in the early Meiji period. The third son (Sawagi Tsunesuke, 1822-1875) would remain and work in Nagoya until his death. The second son (Nakamura Issaku) would leave the Owari province to further his studies, traveling throughout Japan and developing the Takamorie technique of built up layers of lacquer creating nearly 3-dimensional works. He would become the carrier of the name, and after a sojourn in Hagi (Choshu), moved to Hiroshima in 1843 where he would pass on his techniques and experience to Kinoshita Kentaro (1829-1915). It was Kentaro who would officially become the third head of the family and who brought the name to the fore with his dedication to Takamorie lacquering. Kinjo Ikkokusai IV (1876-1961) continued to develop the method with new materials and designs. The family is currently under the 7th generation (b. 1965) who was named an important cultural property of Hiroshima Prefecture in 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483742
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Taisho period Lacquer writing box of superb quality decorated with a design of a stone lantern under broad leaves enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box. The scene is performed with Thick slices of shell and lead inlay on black Ro-iro ground with Taka-maki-e and Hira-maki-e designs. Inside is finished in Kin-gin (gold and silver) Nashiji. It contains two ink stones, a solid silver water dropper and Silver lidded box, as well as the original brushes, hole punch and paper knife all in matching Nashiji finish. The box is 38.5 x 15 x 5.5 cm (15 x x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The Rimpa revival of the early 20th century emphasized visual splendor, decorative patterns, and harmonious compositions reflecting nostalgia for the past. However, it was not a strict replication of the past. Artists involved in this movement integrated modern techniques and materials into their work, allowing for a fusion of traditional aesthetics with contemporary artistic practices. This approach enabled artists to create innovative interpretations of the Rimpa style that resonated with the changing times.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1485730
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Ko-Seto-yu Chaire Tea Container by Teishitsu Gigei-in Suwa Sozan I wrapped in a chord bound silk pouch enclosed in the original signed wooden box tied with deer leather, the box bearing the seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 5 cm (2 inches) tall and is in perfect condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1920 item #1485902
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous set of five wooden Kashizra sweets dishes cut from worm eaten hardwood, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Keyaki Meme Chinmoku Kashiki. The title identifies the wood as Keyaki, or Zelkova, a member of the elm family. It is a highly prized hardwood in Japan and has a beautiful undulating grain.. Each dish is 13.5 cm (5-1\4 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. One plate has a water ring, as they were likely used as tea cup saucers for sencha steeped tea.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1485950
The Kura
sold, thank you
Bats, symbol of good fortune, flit over the sunset surface of this Ki-seto vase by Kato Sakusuke enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kiseto Kabin. An inscription inside begins Fukuju ? Zu (Lucky ? Image) and appears to be dated 1919 in the 60 year cyclical Zodiac calendar (possibly 1859). This is followed by the signature of a painter who also signed and dated the vase, indicating Sakusuke made the vase, while another artist provided the decoration. It is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, retaining the original cloth pouch.
Kato Sakusuke I (Sakube, 1808-1893) was born into a family of potters in Owari (mod. Aichi Prefecture). He took over the family business as Kato Kagekiyo and was known for producing both Japanese and Western ceramics for daily use such as sake sets and tea sets. He took the name Sakusuke in his later years. He was succeeded by his son. Kato Sakusuke II (Keizaburo, 1844-1923). He was an avid collector of ancient pottery and devoted himself to researching its shape and techniques. At first he fired porcelain, but later he turned to his main occupation and skillfully copied old pottery such as Furu-seto (old seto ware), Kizeto, Oribe, Shino, Ofukai, and Mishima. He became a master craftsman of the Meiji era with a technique as good as that of his father Kagekiyo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1485958
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite lacquered box covered in gold powder prominently bearing the imperial crest given as a gift to Baron Nakamura Satoru in Meiji 44 (1911). According to the inside of the lid this box was created for the Meiji emperor and given in gratitude to the Baron for his support in creating the Keanfu memorial for fallen soldiers of the Russo-Japanese war. The box is an exquisite example of Imperial splendor featuring leaves tinged with kiri-gane gold inlay over powdered gold on a surface dusted with gold and blue-gold powder. It is 20.5 x 24.5 x 13.5 cm (10 x 8 x 5-1/2 inches) and in perfect condition.
Baron Nakamura Satoru (18 March 1854 – 29 January 1925) was a career soldier in the early Imperial Japanese Army, serving during the Russo-Japanese War, and was an aide-de-camp to Emperor Taishō. He was born the second son of a samurai of Hikone (present-day Shiga Prefecture). Joining the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army in July 1871, he was promoted to corporal in November 1873. After attending the Imperial Army Academy, he was commissioned second lieutenant in November 1874. He fought as an officer in the 2nd Brigade during the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877 then was assigned to the Imperial Army General Staff Office from March 1879. After promotion to Major he became a battalion commander with the 10th Infantry Regiment. He served as an instructor at the Army Staff College from December 1889. Nakamura was appointed aide-de-camp to the Crown Prince (the future Emperor Taishō) in December 1891, and promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1892. During the First Sino-Japanese War, he served as Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan from the end of October 1894 and was promoted to colonel in December of the same year. In April 1897, he was given command of the 46th Infantry Regiment, which served as a garrison force in Taiwan. He was promoted to major general in September 1899. From April 1900, he was chief-of-staff of the military bureau of the Governor-General of Taiwan. In March 1902, Nakamura was assigned command of the 2nd Brigade, which deployed to Manchuria in March 1904 as part of the Japanese Third Army at the start of the Russo-Japanese War. The unit served with distinction during the Battle of Nanshan. During the Siege of Port Arthur Nakamura led a force named the Shirodasukitai, after the distinctive white tasuki used for visibility and identification in the darkness of a pre-dawn attack. The Shirodasukitai assaulted the Russian fortifications three times, taking great casualties. Nakamura was himself wounded during the assault on the night of 26 November 1904, during which most of his 4,500 man unit was annihilated with no significant result.
He continued in command positions and in September 1907, he was made a baron (danshaku) in the kazoku peerage system. At the end of December 1908, he was once again Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan. In September 1914, he served as resident-general of the Kwantung Leased Territory. In January 1915, he was promoted to full general. During World War I he was appointed to sit the Supreme War Council in 1917. On his death, he was posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486010
The Kura
$650.00
A set of 12 natural gourd bowls lacquered black inside for serving small appetizers and Suimono soup used to cleanse the pallet between courses in traditional Kaiseki cuisine. Made from natural gourds, they vary in size, roughly 6 at 10.5 cm (4 inches) diameter, 6 at 12 cm (5 inches) diameter. They are in overall fine condition.
The basic setting in Japanese food is Ichiju-Sansai or one soup, three dishes. So instead of mixing everything on one plate, each part of the meal is given its own dish. Much Japanese food is still served fresh, and so the four seasons are an indispensable factor for the table. Suimono Wan are bowls for clear soup served between parts of the meal to clean the palette.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486054
The Kura
Price on Request
A spectacular Meiji to Taisho period Golden box decorated with a spray of flowers under an imperial Chrysanthemum. The interior and bottom are elegant Nashiji, and the border between box and lid is protected by a solid silver rim. Kirigane cut gold flakes decorate the raised leaves. It comes enclosed in a custom made kiri-wood storage box. The gilded receptacle is 30 x 24.5 x 14 cm (12 x 9-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches) and it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1486081
The Kura
$1,600.00
A large vase, the mouse-colored glaze inlaid with vertical lines of white slip reminiscent of traditional Kyoto Mugiwara design by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Utsushi Nawa-Sudare Cho Kabin (Vase inlaid with Draped Rope design following Ninsei style). It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 26 cm10 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base Kozan alongside the impressed seal of the artist.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1487200
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully cast bronze dragon waterspout from an ancient Japanese garden in Nara prefecture made to rise over the edge of a water basin, the water trickling out through his mouth. It retains the original bronze pipe and connector, overall, in excellent original condition. The dragon itself is roughly 25 x 13 x 20 cm tall (10 x 5 x 8 inches) and weighs 3.9 kg (8.5 pounds). Including the pipe roughly 50 cm long.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1487456 (stock #LAC085)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of five Mokko-gata (elongated-lobed) kashi-zara wood dishes, each uniquely decorated with seasonal flora in raised lacquer with mother of pearl and lead inlay enclosed in an older wooden storage box. The artist has made excellent use of the natural wood grain, allowing it to fomr a backdrop like bushes and garden stones for the subdued tones of gold, silver and shimmering mother of pearl. Each dish is 18.5 x 14 cm (7-1/4 x 5-3/4 inches) and all are in excellent condition, dating from the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1487635
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gohon crackled pale glaze covers this Tenmoku shaped Chawan decorated with a blossoming plum harbinger of Spring, signed Sozan followed by a long verse in dramatic calligraphy. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy. Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However, unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1488700 (stock #OC017)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A handle surmounts the peak of this beautifully rendered vase by Myagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Sometsuke Te-oke-gata Kabin (Celadon Handled Bucket Shaped Vase with Blue and White Design). It is 16 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32.5 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1489008
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of three Chin puppies by Miyagwa (Makuzu) Kozan II published in the book Miyagawa Kozan and the World of Makuzu Ware (Yokohama Museum of Art, 2001) page 144, figure 174. They are roughly 5 x 10 cm (2 x 4 inches) and in excellent condition. They come enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1910 item #1474794 (stock #OC004)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gold dragons prance about the vermillion surface of this exquisite vessel by important Meiji potter Eiraku Zengoro XIV (Tokuzen) enclosed in the original signed wooden box which is in turn enclosed in an outer box also annotated by a later generation Eiraku. Remembered specifically for his mastery of Aka-e Kinsai ware, this is a museum worthy example of this important potters work. It is 43 cm (17 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Eiraku Tokuzen (Eiraku Zengoro XIV, 1853-1909) was born the first son of the 12th generation Eiraku Wazen He was named the 14th Zengoro at the age of 18 in 1871. This was only a couple years after the Fall of the Shogunate and restoration of the Meiji emperor, a hard time for potters specializing in Tea ware, which was experiencing a backlash as did many things associated with what had been traditional societal ranking and privilege. However Tokuzen worked hard to both maintain ties with the tea world, while making efforts to embrace a global audience. In 1873 Eiraku wares were exhibited at the Vienna World Exposition, and in 1876, Philadelphia, then Paris in 1878. At the same time new approaches to pottery pioneered by Eiraku were exhibited at the 1875 Kyoto Hakurankai in the cultural heartland of Japan. In 1882 he opened in a new Kiln in the Eastern hills called the Kikutani Kiln (Valley of Chrysanthemum) specializing in high end tea ware for both Maccha and Sencha teas, while expanding into daily wares for the growing middle class.