The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1487457
The Kura
$400.00
A set of four long low doors from an alcove painted with the scene of men floating logs downt the Hozu river from Kameoka into Kyoto’s Arashiyama district. This was a favorite scene of Nihonga artists from time immemorial. The scee is performed with ink and gofun powdered shell on paper with applied gold flake, each panel wrapped in a black lacquered frame with bronze handles. 47 x 29 cm (18-1/2 x 11-1/2 inches) and they are made for an opening 185.5 x 28.5 cm (73 x 11-1/4 inches). Overall excellent condition, signed by the artist on the far right.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1487710 (stock #OC019)
The Kura
$2,900.00
Sale Pending
Reaching for his hat, the boatman leans out arms extended toward the prow, protected from the elements under a woven reed roof. This beautiful incense burner comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 x 8 x 10 cm (9-1/2 x 3-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1488230
The Kura
$2,750.00
Phoenix soar among golden clouds on this amazing Lacquer box made for holding a Tsuzumi drum by Miura Meiho (1900-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Houn Maki-e Tuzumi Bako. It is bound with silk chord which is held to the box with solid silver hardware. Inside it is lined with brocade. The box is 30.5 x 24 x 24.5 cm (12 x 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches) an is in perfect condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488233
The Kura
$395.00
A carved wooden bowl wrapped in floral motifs dating from the early 20th century signed beneath by the carver. The dimensional imagery depicts lotus leaves, lotus root and clusters of Biwa (loquat) fruit. It is 21 x 20 x 5 cm (roughly 8 inches diameter, 2 inches tall) and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488356
The Kura
sold, thank you
A tiny tree frog rests safely on the edge of the broad leaf of a Basho tree, the leaf just beginning to curl in upon itself, a sign of the delicate transience of life. It is 50 cm long and in overall excellent condition signed beneath by the artist.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488357
The Kura
$350.00
The basho leaf begins to split and fold over upon itself, a symbol of the transient nature of life appropriate to the confines of the tea room. It is 39.5 cm long and in excellent, original condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488414
The Kura
$700.00
A stunning unadorned work of wood art covered in a thin layer of wiped on lacquer (Fuki Urushi) dating from the early 20th century. The artist puts nothing but his craft into the mottled grain of the tray, a true mark of wood mastery and humility. It is 42 x 31.5 x 3 cm (roughly 16 x 12-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. This is in the style of Ichikawa Shudo, and comes from a collection of several works by him.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488518
The Kura
$1,200.00
A beautifully carved tray of overlapping leaves interspersed with clustered grapes by Ichikawa Shudo signed on back in a circular cartouche. In one corner an odd round tail leads us to a squirrel head popping through the leaves, as if one were looking up through the vines toward the sky. It is 46 x 35 x 3 cm (roughly 18 x 14 x 1 inches) and is in overall fine condition, There is a slight warp to the bottom of the tray, but it is still bery usable and there is no damage to the carving. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489438
The Kura
$1,200.00
A classic vessel reflecting the grace of Song-Yuan period aesthetics by master of the genre Suwa Sozan II (Torako) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 25 cm (10 inches) tall and in excellent condition. A prime example of this early female Japanese potters work.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489472
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A small vase sculpted in the shape of a cluster of roses covered in cockscomb red by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase shows the influence of Art-Nouveau, and Rokubei was one of the leading proponents of blending Western and Eastern ideals in clay art. The vase is 6.5cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 18.5cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in the original artist stamped cloth complete with the original black wood stand.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1489650
The Kura
$965.00
An exquisitely carved wooden tray in the shape of a Bushukan (Buddhas Hand Fruit) made for presentation of Sencha Tea dating from the early 20th century signed on back Koseki. Upon one curling leaf rests a snail opposite a frog staring off into the distance as in a Zen state. The tray is 53.5 x 30 cm (21 x 12 inches) and is in excellent condition. Beneath is equally beautifully carved, with the signature Koseki engraved into the stem of the cluster.
The importance of the Sencha tea aesthetic from the late Edo through the early Showa periods cannot be overlooked, and has been studied in depth in the book Tea of the Sages, the Art of Sencha by Patricia Jane Graham.
Bushukan, also known as Buddha's hand fruit, is a unique citrus fruit that holds significant cultural and symbolic importance in various Asian cultures, particularly in China and Japan. Buddha's hand fruit is often associated with good fortune, happiness, and longevity. In Buddhist culture, the fruit is sometimes offered in temples or used as a religious offering. Its association with Buddha's hand signifies spiritual purity and enlightenment. The fruit's visually striking appearance makes it popular for decorative purposes, especially during festivals and celebrations. It's often displayed in homes as a symbol of prosperity and good luck.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469135 (stock #L013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Layer upon layer of lacquer has been carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the surface in a style known as Guri by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in a wooden box titled Guri Kobon. It is 23 x 33 cm (9 x 13 inches) and in excellent condition, the artist seal inlayed in mother of pearl beneath. The box is annotated by his adopted daughter and heir Torako (Suwa Sozan II).
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469253 (stock #OC057)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A small Raku style Chawan by Suwa Sozan I decorated with a mountain by Daitokuji priest Sohan Gempo (Murasakino Shoun) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The mountain image in a single dark stroke is accented by fluctuating knife marks in the clay surface like a blowing breeze. The bowl is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. Close in age and having come to the old capitol from other provinces at roughly the same time, these two were long term compatriots in Kyoto. both passed away in the same year.
Sohan Gempo, (1848-1922) was born into a Shinto family, however entered the Buddhist priesthood at the age of 12 at Kogen-ji, Kanazawa. After a brief period at Empukuji in Kyoto, he moved to Yokohama and received inka from Nakahara Nantenbo. It was in 1898 that he would be asked to take over the training facility at Empukuji. After a brief sojourn in China he came back to Japan and was appointed abbot of Daitokuji, one of Kyotos most important Zen temples, where he stayed until his death in 1922. He often signed his works (Murasakino) Shoun. An accomplished poet and calligrapher, for more information on this important priest see The Art of 20th Century Zen by Audrey Yoshiko Seio and Stephen Addiss (2000) or recently published Zenmi—a Taste of Zen: Paintings, Calligraphy, and Ceramics from the Riva Lee Asbell Collection.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469330 (stock #OC070)
The Kura
sold, thank you
First we hear the clang of the hammer striking the bell, then the steadily approaching clop of his wooden shoes before the horrifying creature dressed in the robes of an itinerant priest appears; a ledger in one hand noting our sins. This is a very rare ceramic figurine by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Nenbutsu Oni and bearing the seal of the imperial Art Academy. It is 30 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition. He would have originally held a hammer, no longer extant. This summer, among other works by this artist, one of these sculptures, a one-eyed goblin, was on display at the Kyoto Kyocera Museum; part of their Imperial Art Academy Exhibition.
The Oni no Nenbutsu is one of the more popular figures from Otsu-e; a folk painting tradition from the town on the outskirts of Kyoto; the first or last stop coming to or leaving the capitol on the old Tokaido road. A pantheon of almost 200 characters, one of the most popular was the goblin, which came into vogue in the 18th century. Although the western goblin is a symbol of evil in religious iconography, in the Otsu-e tradition the symbol was used to satirize human folly and to remind people of the consequences of their actions. Other goblin images present remonstrations against arrogance, hypocrisy and carelessness. Utagawa Kuniyoshi created a woodblock print depicting the Otsu-e figures coming to life.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469368 (stock #L006)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exceedingly rare (in fact the only one I have ever seen) Tenmoku-Dai stand for a Tenmoku Chawan by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kuruwa Tenmoku Dai (Curved Circular Tea Bowl Stand). It is made of layer upon layer of lacquer, carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the lacquer in a style known as Guri. The artist has carved his seal into the inside of the base. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter7.5 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1469371 (stock #L009)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original wooden box titled Kagyu-tsuki Take Kake-hana-ire (Bamboo Hanging Vase with Snail) bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in Seal of the Imperial Art Academy signed inside “Sozan, with Amateur Skill” followed by the artists seal in red. It is 49 cm long and in excellent condition. The only other I have ever seen in this style is published in the rare 1971 book Suwa Sozan Sakuhin Shu page 59.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469372 (stock #L016)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large table made of layers of lacquer carved through to reveal the various colors by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Guri Joku and bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in Seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 65 x 40.5 x 20 cm (25-1/2 x 16 x 8 inches) and is in excellent condition. The artists seal is expertly incised into the back of one ball shaped foot.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.