The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1491403 (stock #K028)
The Kura
$2,400.00
Sale Pending
A Kenzan style Chawan Tea Bowl decorated with blossoming plum bending over a golden rim by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original wooden box signed inside on the box floor by the aritst with an annotation inside the lid by Omotosenkei Iemoto Tea Master Seisai (1863-1937) reading Makuzu Yaki Chawan Ume-no-ga Ari (Makuzu Pottery Tea Bowl Decorated with Plum). It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter, 7cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1491395 (stock #Oc006)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous example exploring the various traits of traditional Shigaraki pottery with a thick swath of glaze covering one side, telltale feldspathic inclusions bursting from the raw clay opposite. This is a classic example of 16th century Shigaraki pottery. It is 29 x 31 x 35 cm (11-1/2 x 12 x 14 inches) and in overall excellent condition. The history of Shigaraki traces its origins to around the 12th century with the discovery of exceptional clay deposits rich in iron and other minerals which contribute to its distinct rustic charm. The clay's natural tones, ranging from warm browns to deep russet, evoke the earth's organic essence. The subtle imperfections and irregularities of the forms and glazes mimic the irregularities found in nature, embodying the concept of wabi-sabi. Shigaraki ware captures the essence of simplicity, modesty, and reverence for the natural world, reflecting the philosophical ideals deeply rooted in Japanese culture. During the Muromachi and Momoyama periods (1336-1603), the popularity of Shigaraki pottery soared due to changes in the aesthetic of the tea ceremony, which came to emphasize the importance of humility. Shigaraki pieces, with their earthy tones, and rough natural textures, perfectly embodied the idea, making them highly sought-after by connoisseurs. In the Momoyama period (1573-1603), the introduction of anagama kilns that foster the spontaneous and unpredictable nature of the firing process, further enhanced the uniqueness of Shigaraki ceramics leaving beautiful variations in glaze and color based on, among other factors, kiln placement, fuel, firing time, convection, temperature, oxidation, and atmospheric conditions. Shigaraki celebrates the natural properties of the clay it is made from with the idea of Tsuchi-aji (literally Clay Flavor). Tsuchi-aji refers to the “visual taste” of the clay and is highly prized by connoisseurs. The surface often displays fascinating natural effects, including "hi-iro" (fire coloration), "koge" (scorch marks), Shizen-yu (natural ash glaze) and various "Yohen" (alterations). They contribute to the distinctive and organic aesthetic of Shigaraki pottery. Each piece tells a story of its journey through the firing process, reflecting the harmonious relationship between the artist, the kiln, and the natural elements. The interplay of clay, fire, and ash creates a captivating visual narrative, making Shigaraki pottery a testament to the beauty of the moment, the ephemeral and the accidental.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1900 item #1491125 (stock #K011)
The Kura
$200.00
A small carved Zushi in the form of a cave housing a red stone in the shape of the Daruma, progenitor of Zen Buddhism in Japan. It is 6 x 4.2 x 8.3 cm (2-1/2 x 1-3/4 x 3-1/4 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, dating from the This would have been made as a talisman to ward off evil spirits. later Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1491120 (stock #K009)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A diminutive image of Hotei (Putai) the lucky god of fortune from the Edo period kilns of the Matsudaira clan of Matsue in their distinct golden color. It is 4.5 x 3.3 x 4 cm tall and is in excellent condition. Fushina-yaki was the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue Han in modern day Izumo, established around 1764. It fell strongly under the aesthetic taste of Matsudaira Harusato (1751-1818) Daimyo of the province and one of the most influential Tea Masters of the later Edo period. His style of ceremony continues to this day as the Fumai-ryu style of tea.
Flagging in the late 19th century, artists such as the great scholar and Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu sought to revitalize it, and came to Shimane to decorate the works or to teach decoration and painting techniques. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro in the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1491105 (stock #K002)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Bairin Yaki Suiteki water dropper in the shape of an eggplant and bowl covered in that quintessential Bairin purple and green glaze flowing into the water bowl. It is 10.5 x 6 x 4.5 cm (4 x 2-1/4 x 2 inches and is in overall nice condition, with miniscule chips repaired on the rim. Suiteki are used to provide water for grinding ink on an ink stone.
Bairin Yaki was a resurrection of the ancient Omi style of ceramic called Zeze favored by Kobori Enshu and Honami Koetsu. Zeze Yaki died out in the mid 1600s, but was reestablished by Odawara Ihe-e sometime during the Tenmei Era (1781-1789), with brighter colors. It was, however not long lived, and appears to have died out again sometime in the 1840s. It was again revitalized in the Late Edo and Meiji eras under the name Seta-yaki, and again the lineage died in the Taisho period. An unusual opportunity for the collector of Japanese ceramics.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1491103 (stock #K008)
The Kura
$550.00
Sale Pending
A Fushina (Fujina) yaki image of the three monkeys made to support the Kettle lid in the Japanese Tea Ceremony dating from the Edo period. A warning to all, the little creatures hear nothing, see nothing and speak nothing. What happens in the tea room, stays in the tea room! The figure is 4.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter the same height and in excellent condition. Impressed into the base is the Rakuzan seal. It comes in an antique woven thread pouch.
Rakuzan pottery falls under the umbrella of Fushina or Fujina Yaki, the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue in modern day Izumo, sometimes simply called Izumo-yaki. The origin of Rakuzan ware lies in the early Edo period, when the second generation Matsudaira Tsunataka requested a Hagi ware potter from the neighboring Mori clan, which was eventually granted to the third generation Izumo leader Matsudaira Tsunachika around 1677. The founders of the kiln were Kurasaki Gonbei and Kada Hanroku. Although under continuous production, the kiln had its ups and downs until it was strongly revived by the 8th Lord of Matsue, Matsudaira Harusato (Fumaiko 1751-1818) Daimyo of the province. From then it fell strongly under his aesthetic taste. Flagging in the late 19th century, artists such as the great scholar and Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu sought to revitalize it, and came to Shimane to decorate the works or to teach decoration and painting techniques. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro in the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1491102 (stock #K010)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A diminutive image of the three monkeys made to support the Kettle lid in the Japanese Tea Ceremony dating from the later 19th to early 20th centuries by Nagaoka Kuumi enclosed in the original signed wooden box. A warning to all, the little creatures hear nothing, see nothing and speak nothing. What passes in the tea room stays in the tea room. The figure is 4.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter the same height and in excellent condition. Impressed into the base is the artists seal.
Nagaoka Kuumi (1874-1960) was the son of Kunyu, and was the 9th generation successor to Rakuzan ware. He took the reins during a period of revival in the Tea world and was inspired by the famous tea ceremony equipment exhibited at the 100th anniversary of the death of Tea Master and Daimyo of Izumo Matsudaira Fumaiko (1751-1818).
Rakuzan pottery falls under the umbrella of Fushina or Fujina Yaki, the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue in modern day Izumo, sometimes simply called Izumo-yaki. The origin of Rakuzan ware lies in the early Edo period, when the second generation Matsudaira Tsunataka requested a Hagi ware potter from the neighboring Mori clan, which was eventually granted to the third generation Izumo leader Matsudaira Tsunachika around 1677. The founders of the kiln were Kurasaki Gonbei and Kada Hanroku. Although under continuous production, the kiln had its ups and downs until it was strongly revived by the 8th Lord of Matsue, Matsudaira Harusato (Fumai 1751-1818) Daimyo of the province. From then it fell strongly under his aesthetic taste. Flagging in the late 19th century, artists such as the great scholar and Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu sought to revitalize it, and came to Shimane to decorate the works or to teach decoration and painting techniques. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro in the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1491100 (stock #K007)
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A crusty wood fired Bizen dish with looping handle, one hemisphere rounded, the other pinched as if for pouring, dating from the Edo period enclosed in an ancient custom fit lacquered Kiri-wood box. It is 23.5 x 22cm x 12.5 cm (roughly 9 inches diameter, 5 inches tall) and is in surprisingly excellent overall condition, with a few nicks to the edge of the foot consistent with age. Evidencing the centuries, there is a loss near the handle to some thicker glaze encrustation. This only happens with Bizen after a great deal of time. A dish like this would have been used for serving sweets in a tea room, or perhaps some skewered grilled fish in a traditional meal. The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The firing process allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Simplicity of form enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1490965
The Kura
$900.00
A crane rises elegantly from a truncated tree, the legs intricately crafted and the body flowing in a liquid grace. This is Bizen Saikumono, a body of Bizen popular throughout the Edo, Meiji and early 20th centuries. Craftsman carved wild animals, mythical beasts, human figures and many other figures out of the smooth Bizen clay, relying on perfection of form, allowing the firing to add color without overt decoration. This figure is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in a period wooden box dated the 8th month of Koka 3 (1846). As one might expect from something nearly two hundred years old, there is a well done invisible repair in the neck, otherwise is in excellent condition.
The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The beauty of Bizen pottery lies in its adherence to wood-fired kilns. The firing process is crucial, as it allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Saiku-mono or figurative pottery works have their roots much further back, but were very popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Simplicity of form, often inspired by nature and everyday objects, enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1490920
The Kura
$400.00
A porcelain bowl made by Mokusen of Kyoto decorated in blue with waterbirds taking flight from a reed-dotted shore followed by a four character verse by Oyabu Shunko enclosed in the original wooden box signed by both artists dating from the early 20th century. It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 9 cm 3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Mokusen was a prolific porcelain artist in Kyoto well known for his tea ware. Oyabu Shunko was born in Kyoto in 1901 and studied Nihonga under Yamamoto Shunkyo, exhibiting with the Bunten where his work was awarded Yusen.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1920 item #1490875
Bonji Sanskrit characters pierce the lotus finialed lid of this large antique bronze incense burner. The vajra-like finial topped in the shape of a lotus flower is hollow, the lotus seed pod pierced with holes to allow the smoke to escape like a chimney. This is also removable, slotting in to the incense burner, and turned to lock it in place. Inside the lid is stained and shiny from years of incense soot built up. It is 35.5 cm (14 inches) tall, 18 cm (7 inches) diameter and in overall excellent condition (a bit dusty in the photos as found).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1490851
The Kura
sold, thank you
A lovely work reflecting the simplicity of Art Deco predominant from the 1920s and 30s by master of the genre Ito Suito enclosed in the original signed wooden box The vase is 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ito Suito (Yoshiharu, 1894-1980) was born in Kyoto and apprenticed under Ito Tozan in 1911. In 1918 he married his daughter, and took the family name and at the same time assumed the name Suito. In 1929 he was first exhibited at the Teiten National Exhibition, and opened his own kiln in 1931 in the Gojo-zaka pottery district of Kyoto. This was the beginning of a long career which would see him displayed and prized at such venues as the Nitten and Kyoten exhibitions. He would be awarded by Kyoto city for his lifes work in 1975 (Kyoto Bijutsu Kogei Koro-sho award) and again in 1979 granted the title Carrier of the Cultural Heritage of Kyoto City (Kyotoshi Bunka Korosha).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1490803
The Kura
sold, thank you
An elegant tall vase in signature soft blue by Shinjo Tozan III of Yamagata enclosed in the original singed wooden box dating from the early half of the 20th century titled Yohen Kabin. It is 15cm (6 inches) diametr, 41cm (16 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Higashiyama (alternatively read Tozan) is the common name for the hilly area in the eastern part of Shinjo City, Yamagata prefecture, and the geology of the village is covered with a thick layer of clay. Yahei Wakui, (1801-1872) the founder of Higashiyama ware, was a potter from Kosugi in Echigo, modern day Toyama prefecture. While traveling the country for training, he fell in love with the clay of Higashiyama, and in 1841 opened a pottery as the official kiln for the Shinjo Tozawa clan.
The third generation Yahei was born on January 29, 1896, as the second son of Yahei II. From an early age, he learned pottery skills from his father and helped the family business. The era in which the third generation Yahei was active was a time of great change, including the global recession after World War I, the Sino-Japanese and the Pacific War. Utilizing the characteristics of Higashiyama's clay, he produced earthenware pots, yukihira, suribachi, blanched pots, kataguchi, and other miscellaneous everyday utensils, and laid the foundation for the fame of today's "Higashiyama ware." The folk-ware researcher Yanagi Soetsu, who was exposed to the pottery of the third generation of Yabe, writes in his book ``Japan of Handicrafts'' that ``They used a beautiful bluish sea cucumber glaze to fire earthenware pots...'' (Omitted) As an earthenware pot, it is said to be the most beautiful in Japan. Yahei III passed away on October 23, 1945 at the age of 73. Currently the 7th generation works alongside his father
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490730
The Kura
$1,500.00
A smoke tendril rises from the mouth of a bloated toad forming an Usubata flower basin in heavy olive patinated yellow bronze. The basin is 19.7 cm (7-3/4 inches) diameter, The entire 24.5 cm (9-3/4 inches) tall and it is in excellent condition. In Japanese the word for Frog is Kaeru, a homonym for: To Return. Thus the symbol of a frog means money going out will come back, a child growing up or a daughter marrying will come back to visit etc. Gama Sennin is one of the most depicted Sennin (Saints), a Daoist sage based on Liu Hai of ancient China. He has great magical powers and carries around on his back a large toad. In Chinese legend he learned all the secrets of Magic and the universe from the toad. Frogs have been known as a symbol of prosperity in ancient Chinese culture since time immemorial. As per Feng Shui, keeping frog figurines at home or in the office area, offers protection to the space and brings prosperity to one's life.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1490654
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous bowl by the first-generation Kato Keizan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tenranji Zuicho Moyo Hachi (Bowl with Blue Glaze Decorated with Auspicious Birds). Tenran is a blue glaze made by the official kiln of the Qing Dynasty in China. On this in raised white auspicious birds with long tails like dragons circle the rim over archaic symbols reflecting continental taste popular from the Meiji through Taisho to early Showa period. It is 24.5 cm (9-1/2 inches) diameter 13 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kato Keizan I (1886-1963) was born in Tajimi city, Gifu, a pottery center in its own right, however came to Kyoto to apprentice under Kiyomizu Rokubei IV (1848-1920). He established himself in 1912 in the same neighborhood in Kyoto, where he became well known for celadon and Chinese based porcelain forms. He was especially remembered for Tenryuji seiji (Chinese Long Quan celadon porcelain). Works by this artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #1490653
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted incense burner in the shape of a nesting crane dating from the 19th to opening of the 20th century, Late Edo to Meiji period). It comes enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood collectors box. It is 12.5 x 24 x 16 cm (5 x 9-1/2 x 6 inches). Although not altogether clear there appears to be a possible old repair to the back of the head.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1490628
The Kura
$900.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful ivory white vase in the shape of a handled-wooden-bucket, the outside wrapped with woven bamboo forming an outer bamboo basket shell, with the handle wrapped in bamboo rope. It is 42 cm (16 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Tobe-yaki Kabin signed by the maker. Inside the lid is an inscription stating the vase was received as a gift on the 6th day of the 11th month of Taisho 8 (1919).
Tobe-yaki originated in 1777 when Katō Yasutoki, 9th lord of the Ōzu Domain (1769–1787), started hiring potters from Hizen for production of white porcelain (hakuji). The area was long known for production of fine whetstones, and as the amount of whetstone deposits dried up, the waste was powdered for the making of pottery. During the Edo period (1603-1868), Tobe ware developed independently since there was limited information from other competing domains. After the abolition of the feudal system and the establishment of prefectures in 1871 it became possible to import technology from famous production areas such as Karatsu and Seto which led Tobe ware to expand rapidly. As technology started to make mass production possible, Tobe ware expanded its market into Southeast Asia. Then during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and Showa period (1926-1988), porcelain producing areas such as Seto increased their production volume by adopting modern technology like mechanical potter's wheels, leading the handicraft Tobe ware to stagnate. However, Yanagi Soetsu (1889-1961), one of the founders of the Mingei movement lauded its high quality technique, ensuring the tradition continue.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490603
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A 19th century Bronze incense burner int eh shape of a burning Buddhist jewel supported on five legs of curling smoke tendrils, alternating with five looping handles. It is 20 cm (8 inches) tall to the finial, and in excellent condition.