The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1447618 (stock #MOR8146)
The Kura
$4,500.00
A striking red lacquered cylindrical zushi with pagoda roof housing an image of the Kangiten, a pair of embracing human figures with elephant heads in the style of the Hindu god Ganesha. Here the embracing Kangiten icon is kept under a phallic cover called the linga-kosa, when not being worshiped, and sequestered away behind closed doors. Incised into the base of the figure is the date Mid Autumn of Bunka 9 (1812) and signature Goto Mitsugi-saku. The cover is gilded in gold, then coated in transparent red lacquer in a technique called Byakudan Nuri. The red-lacquered pagoda is made of wood with brass fittings. It appears to me that many of the parts were re-purposed from some other Buddhist artifacts, and the base appears to be of considerable age. The gilt bronze image is 6 cm (2-1/2 inches) tall. The red lacquered zushi capped with a Buddhist jewel is 43 cm (17 inches) tall and both are in overall excellent original condition.
Kangiten (Kankiten) is a form of the Hindu god Ganesha in the pantheon of the ancient Shingon sect of Japanese Buddhism. Although Kangiten is typically depicted as an elephant headed male deity, his most popular aspect is the Dual-bodied Kangiten; an elephant-headed male-female human couple standing in embrace. Paintings and gilt-bronze images of the Dual Kangiten with explicit sexual connotations emerged in the late Heian period, under the Tantric influence of Tibetan Buddhism where sexual iconography was common. The rare Japanese sexual iconography was hidden from public eye, to abide with Confucian ethics. Kangiten is regarded as protector of temples and worshiped generally by gamblers, actors, entertainers and people in the business of "pleasure". Because of Kangiten’s esoteric sexual nature, his image is often shrouded from view
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1447613 (stock #MOR8145)
The Kura
$650.00
A perfect example of the post-war move toward minimalism in this hand formed copper vase enclosed in the original wooden box titled Uchidashi Hana-sashi (hand beaten Flower receptacle) signed Toshitaka followed by a red seal reading Toshi. The vessel has been made of hand beaten copper tinned entirely within, while outside the tinning alternates with equal bands of ji-gane copper. The base is marked by the artist. It is 12 x 17 x 26 cm (5 x 6-1/2 x 10-1/2 inches) and in overall excellent, original condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1447483 (stock #TCR8144)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
No discussion on 20th century Kyoto ceramics can skip over the importance of the Kyoto Shi Tojiki Shiken-sho ceramics research facility at which all the luminaries studied and laid the foundation for a number of the early Living National Treasures. Here is a delicate vessel with elegant curves decorated with poppies dating from the early 20th century enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled : Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho-sei (Made by the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility) Keshi Moyo Kabin (Poppy Design Vase). It is 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The Kyoto Shi Tojiki Shikensho or Kyoto Municipal Ceramics Research Institute was founded in 1903 and under that specific persona existed until 1920. The facility was the proving ground for such luminaries as Kondo Yuzo, Kusube Yaichi, Kawai Kanjiro, Hamada Shoji and Komori Shinobu among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1920 item #1447319 (stock #MOR8143)
The Kura
$1,500.00
Minogame sea turtles with their distinctive fan-like tails climb from the depths up onto the rocks, an excellent Japanese hardwood carving dating from the late 19th to early 20th century. The artist has managed to capture both the movement and strength of these mysterious creatures, stretching their necks out in curiosity. Cut from a single block of wood, it is 20 x 25 x 13.5 cm (8 x 10 x 6 inches) and in excellent condition. A black lacquered table will be included for display (not pictured).
The Minogame is regarded as a very auspicious creature in Japanese culture and has made appearances in arts, crafts, and popular culture since time immemorial. The name comes from its most distinctive feature, a tail of seaweed which trails behind it like the traditional Mino (straw rain coat). The Minogame is said to live a thousand years, and is a revered symbol of longevity, often depicted along with the crane and some of the Daoist immortals. It has very similar to the real-life common tortoise, which can live for hundreds of years and can be seen with growths of algae on their shells.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1447318 (stock #TCR8142)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
Gold glimmers on the rim against pale concrete tones on this rare mid-Edo period tea bowl from the Utsutsugawa kiln in Nagasaki prefecture, late 17th to early 18th century. Waves of brush strokes decorate the outside, while the white slip cascades from the rim in withering streaks within. A kutsuki on the side testifies to some event which happened during the firing, where another piece of pottery collapsed against the side, fusing and causing the bowl to deform. This force created a crack where the bowl bent, which has now been enhanced with gold. It comes enclosed in a custom made modern wooden collectors box titled Utsutsugawa Kama Kutsu-Gata Chawan. The bowl is 8.5 x 14 x 7 cm (3-1/2 x 6 x 3 inches. Originally a kiln flaw, possibly once discarded, it was rescued and repaired with a sumptuous design of gold powder on lacquer.
Utsutsugawa-yaki (also Utsutsukawa) originated in Nagasaki in the late 17th century. It is said it began when Tanaka Gyobusaemon (Soetsu) opened a kiln around 1690. It is characterized by brown orange clay with a heavy iron content and was most often decorated with Brush strokes in white slip. Although at one time it was called the Ninsei of the West, the manufacture lasted only about 50 years due to the financial aspect of the clan, and it disappeared until the later Meiji period, when there was an attempted revival, but that too failed to last due to pressures of modernization. In modern times the art was revived by Yokoishi Gagyu, and has been named an important cultural property of Nagasaki Prefecture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1800 item #1447231 (stock #R016)
The Kura
$3,500.00
Sale Pending
A magnificently rendered image of the Buddha lying on his death bed. All about the holy lament the loss, Gods cry, the animal fall back in grieving. His mother drops a satchel of medicine but it gets hung up in a tall tree. Yet the sanctified figure lies calm, as if asleep, a slight smile on his face as he knows his part is complete, and cycle of death and rebirth has been broken. Those witnessing the Buddha’s passing from earthly life reveal their own imperfect level of enlightenment in the extent of their grief. Bodhisattvas, who have achieved the spiritual enlightenment of Buddhahood, envisioned here in princely raiment show a solemn serenity except for the Bodhisattva Jizō, who appears to be sleeping near the center of the bier. Shaven-headed disciples weep bitterly, as do the multi-limbed Hindu deities and guardians who have been converted to the Buddha’s teaching. Men and women of every class, joined by more than thirty animals, grieve in their imperfect understanding of the Buddhist ideal. Pigment on silk in a blue silk border with red accents. According to an inscription on the back, it was made in 1727 donated by Kawai Hachiroemon in memoriam of his mother, restored in 1883 by a descendant of Hachiroemon. On the box is written a third date, stating it was again restored in Taisho 14 (1925) and that seems very much in keeping with the current cloth border. The only issue I have with this scroll is that the red Ichimonji is rigid, perhaps backed too firmly or the silk was not softened enough, so cups on top and bottom. Otherwise it is in excellent condition. The scroll is 90 x 178 cm (35-1/2 x 70 inches). According to Jaanus, Paintings became the preferred form of representation (Of the death of the Buddha) in Japan because they were used for the nirvana rite performed annually on the fifteenth day of the second month in memory of Shaka's death. These paintings generally depict Shaka lying on his right side on a couch below sal trees surrounded by mourners, traditionally said to comprise 52 kinds of beings that include his disciples, bodhisattvas, gods, lay people, animals and his mother Mahamaya, hastening down from heaven.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1446916 (stock #MOR8140)
The Kura
$850.00
A beautiful mid-century metal vase, hand formed and etched with birds, by Kataoka Kokan. It comes enclosed in an unsigned wooden box accompanied by the artists card. The vessel is 30 cm (12 inches) diameter, 23 cm (9 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Kataoka Kokan (1928-1988) studied metalworking under Kōshun Hiramatsu (1896-1975) an important figure in the applied art scene of the Kansai region who along with Banura Shōgo (1901-1982) and Nishi Daiyū (1923-2013) co-founded the Gendai Kōgei Bijyutsuka Kyōkai (Contemporary Arts and Crafts Association) in 1961. Kōkan was a member of both that organization as well as the Nihon Kinko-sakka Kyokai (Japan Metalworkers Association). Works by the artist is held in the collection of the Tokyo University of the Arts Museum.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1446766 (stock #MOR8139)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A fragment from the back right quarter of a large Edo period Buddhist image carved of cedar. Larger than life size, split along what was likely the original joints in traditional Yosegi style of Japanese joined wood Buddhist carving. It is very likely a Buddhist image of this size was destroyed during the Haibutsu Kishaku era at the beginning of the Meiji period (literally "abolish Buddhism and destroy Shākyamuni"), and perhaps some faithful kept a portion as a talisman. The carving itself is 42 cm (17 inches) tall, and floats 4.5 cm (2 inches) in the air mounted on a metal stand.
The anti Buddhist movement of the mid 19th century was an event triggered by the official policy of separation of Shinto and Buddhism, which had existed relatively equal, sometimes overlapping, for a milenia. Although relatively short lived, it caused great damage to Buddhism in Japan. It came in response to many social factors: the power held by many Buddhist Temples, the decadence of many Buddhist monks and priests, the close association between Buddhism and the failing Shogunate, and the sudden unwelcome influx of foreign influence brought on by Western gunboat diplomacy among them. After the fall of the Shogunate in 1868 destruction of Buddhist property took place on a large scale all over the country. It is estimated that 40,000 Buddhist temples were destroyed in Japan during this disastrous nationwide anti-Buddhist mayhem, and in the former domain of Satsuma, a center for Imperial support, all temples were destroyed or appropriated.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1446322 (stock #ANR8134)
The Kura
$4,800.00
A pair of Rimpa floral scenes splayed across 2 small six panel screens by Hattori Shunyo dating from the early 20th century. Bold colors and strong design elements combined with the trademark tarashikomi (diluted elements created when water is applied to the surface before or after pigments causing them to diffuse) exhibit the artists deep devotion to this important Japanese painting tradition. Pigment on gilded silk, signed and sealed Shunyo. Perfect for wall hanging, each screen is 276 x 94 cm (108-1/2 x 37 inches) and both are in great condition.
Due to size the cost of shipping will be accrued separately.
Hattori Shunyo (b. 1883) was an artist from Kyoto who graduated the (now) Kyoto Municipal University of Art and fell under the circle of Yamamoto Shunkyo. His work Morning Wind was selected for and awarded at the very first Bunten National Exhibition in 1908. A pair of screens depicting the cultivation of rice through the seasons is held int eh collection of Musashino Art University.
According to the scholarship of the Yamatane Museum of Art: The Rimpa depiction of nature was colorful. The Rimpa style’s decorativeness (sic), with a lavish use of gold and silver, and its innovative design sense originated in Hon’ami Kōetsu’s and Tawaraya Sōtatsu’s day. Generation after generation of Rimpa artists continued those practices. In ink painting, the Rimpa school artists were distinguished by their use of the “tarashikomi” technique to create pooled, blurred colors in what is called boneless painting (painting in darker and lighter ink washes, without outlines). Works depicting flora and fauna using “tarashikomi” have a generous, heartwarming ambience; we sense in them the gentle gaze these artists directed at nature.
The Meiji period’s waves of Westernization wrought major changes in the world of Japanese art. At the same time, Japanese art was attracting intense interest in the West, where the Rimpa school came to be highly regarded. That led, in the twentieth century, to a reassessment of Rimpa in Japan and a full-scale Rimpa boom, extensive research, and the enthusiastic collection and display of Rimpa works. Works that showed Rimpa influence began to appear, particularly from about 1910 on. Artists had the opportunity to encounter Rimpa work not only through exhibitions and published collections of paintings but also through the works that collectors, who were also their patrons, had assembled. These interactions inspired artists to deepen their study of the Rimpa school and incorporate the results in their work
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1445979 (stock #TCR8133)
The Kura
$6,000.00
A set of six western style Tea cups with matching saucers, each with a unique flower design by Seifu Yohei III enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Each set has a unique floral arrangement in a unique color, purple, pink, orange, yellow, blue and white. The cups are 8.5 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter, the saucers are 13.3 cm (5 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition.
Seifu Yohei III (1851-1914) was the adopted son of Yohei II. Sent at the age of twelve to study painting under then the top Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu, he returned in 1865 due to illness. The next year he entered as an apprentice the Seifu studio, then under the control of the second generation. As so often happens in these situations, in 1872 he married the daughter, becoming a “Yoji” or adopted son of Yohei II and taking the family name, established himself as an individual artist. Within the year his genius was discovered, and works by him were sent to the Vienna World Exposition. Seifu II retires of illness in 1878, and III succeeds the family kiln. Once again he is honored as the new head of the kiln to produce the dinnerware for the former president of the US Ulysses Grant. His work was highly acclaimed, both domestically and abroad, drawing honors and prizes at the Naikoku Hakurankai (National Exhibition), Chicago and Paris World expositions and being named one of the first members of the Imperial Art Academy specializing in ceramics in 1893 (Tei shitsu Gigei In). Works by this rare artist are held in Museums and collections throughout the world. He was succeeded by the fourth generation Seifu (1871-1951) in 1914.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445699 (stock #TCR8132)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
Pine boughs cascade down the crackled white glazed surface of this ceramic tray accented with green coated outside in red tame-nuri lacquer adorned with plovers and crashing waves in fine lines of gold maki-e from the Toyoraku tradition. It comes enclosed in an old wooden box. It is 24 cm square, 3 cm tall and in overall excellent condition. The stamp on bottom reads Keiraku and comes from the Toyoraku wakigama (side kiln) established by Keisuke around 1842.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. The kiln received the name Toyoraku from Tokugawa Naritaka and was designated an official kiln (Goyogama) of the Owari Tokugawa feudal lords (kin to the Shogun) in December of the 13th year of Tenpo (1842); and it is likely that they were given a stipend as well as some restrictions. At the same time, an apprentice of the Toyoraku Kiln by the name of Keisuke opened a secondary kiln nearby creating similar wares, and is considered to be in the Toyoraku lineage. One might infer that the secondary kiln was opened to avoid restrictions placed upon the Toyoraku kiln when it came under feudal control.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1445698 (stock #TCR8107)
The Kura
$700.00
A fabulous covered bowl decorated with cobalt dragons and covered almost entirely in intricate lacquer designs from the Toyoraku (also read Horaku) tradition in Nagoya. The dragons swirl in both the foot ring, and center ring of the lid. As if to pair, gold dragons slither about in scalloped green cartouches overlaying the ornate Shippo pattern outside, inside completely lacquered black with a nashiji rim with a floral dial in center of both bowl and lid. The bowl is 17 cm (6-3/4 inches) diameter and comes enclosed in a period wooden box. It is in outstanding condition, and one of the finest quality pieces I have seen.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. However from the later Meiji he concentrated on Raku-ware, and the lacquer tradition mostly disappeared from the family ouvre.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445697 (stock #TCR8127)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A very unusual Toyoraku Usubata vase covered outside in black lacquer decorated with geometric gold maki-e designs, the inside nearly swamped by organic green flowing to the center. It comes enclosed in the original somewhat dilapidated wooden box signed: The 75 year old man Toyosuke. This appears to be the signature of the third generation, and so would date from 1854, only a few years prior to the death of the fourth generation who began the technique of lacquering pots. It is 25.5 cm (10 inches) diameter at the top, and stands21 cm (8-1/4 inches) tall, in overall excellent condition. Lacquer has been re-applied to the foot ring and there is a small loss in the bulbous center of the vase.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445665 (stock #TCR8131)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
A rare large bowl of heavily crackled pale white glaze covered inside with red lacquer and decorated with black netting in the Toyoraku tradition. Toyoraku is generally decorated on the outside in lacquer, the interior being ceramic. This turns that image on end with all the decoration inside. It is 18.5 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 10 cm (4 inches) tall. There are 2 small colored repairs to the rim (see close-up photos).
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445664 (stock #TCR8130)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
A set of Edo period Toyoraku red lacquered pottery bowls in an age blackened wooden box. The box is dated to the Tenpo era (1830s-1840s). The bowls are 12 cm diameter. Stamped in the foot with the seal of the fourth generation (1813-1858). Although all matching in style, one is taller than the other four. The bowls are overall in fine condition, with some minor losses to the lacquer where it bends around the foot ring (see close up photos).
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1445597 (stock #TCR8129)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A pottery basin in the shape of a drum covered outside in swatches of colored lacquer in the style of wakasa-nuri with a black lacquered wooden lid. Inside is bereft of decoration but for two draperies of green glaze facing off on opposite sides. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 11 cm (4-1/2 inches) tall and in overall fine condition.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445596 (stock #TCR8128)
The Kura
Sold, with thanks!
Nobori Fuji, sign of the Imperial family, splay there ascending flowers on the red tame-nuri covering this Toyoraku pottery tea bowl decorated inside with what appears to be hollyhock, symbol of the Tokugawa family, between splashes of Oribe green. With both the Hollyhock and Kiri flowers, this could be in celebration of the fact the kiln received official patronage from both the Shogunate and the Imperial household. Stamped using the seal of the Third generation Toyoraku (1779-1864) inside the foot ring, it is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 8 cm (3 inches) tall and in overall fine condition. There is much color infused into the crackled glaze proving it was well used. It comes in a custom made wooden collectors box.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1445543 (stock #TCR8126)
The Kura
$650.00
Sale Pending
A set of five Oribe style lidded bowls covered in red tame-nuri lacquer with auspicious symbols of Iris and Reishi (Chinese Ling Zhi) Mushrooms. Inside a blue floral spray which appears to be wisteria flower curls out from a splash of copper green on the color infused crackled pale glaze. Interior and exterior separated by gold rims. Each bowl is 11 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter, 6 cm (2-1/2 inches) tall and are in fine condition. There is an iridescence in the glaze visible in the foot typical of mid-Meiji pottery, and these likely date from somewhere before the turn of the century. They come enclosed in an old wooden box.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.