The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1473331 (stock #OC051)
The Kura
$750.00
A striking Peacock feather colored flambe glazed vase by Leading Kyoto Potter Uno Ninmatsu enclosed in a signed wooden box dated the 10th month of Showa 5 (October 1930). It is 28 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Uno Ninmatsu (1864-1937) was born in Kyoto son of potter Wada Sohei and studied under his father as well as from a young age Seifu Yohei II then future Imperial Art Academy artist Seifu Yohei III until setting up his own studio at the age of 21. Outgoing by comparison to the normal Kyoto ideal, he promoted Kyoto art and culture and actively sought to invigorate the export market (then dominated by Tokyo and Yokohama). He won a bronze medal at the Paris world exposition in 1901, and gold medal at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904, Belgium in 1905 and Milan the following year. Unlike other potters in Kyoto at this time, he did not overly decorate his works, but concentrated on matte glazes and form in austere glaze techniques. This proved very popular, and from the turn of the century his works were highly sought in the United States. He also worked closely with designers in France, where many of his works were exported. Following the first world war, he retired to the domestic market. He was deeply involved in silk road pottery research and mastered Shinsha (flambe glazes) as well as Turkish Blue and other styles not yet produced at that time in Kyoto. He was father and mentor to Uno Soyo and Uno Sango, and served as mentor to the young Isamu Noguchi.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1473297 (stock #MW010)
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A rare iron hanging censer in the shape of a Mongolian Saddle Stirrup (Abumi) with silver mesh lid covering half the top. It comes in an age-darkened and worm-eaten kiri-wood box titled simply Tsuri Koro. The receptacle is 13.5 x 7 x 15 cm (5-1/2 x 3 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1473244 (stock #NW002)
The Kura
$900.00
Sale Pending
A quintessential Iga vase dating from the Edo period, the rough clay covered in thick ash glaze. It is viciously charred, testament to the tempest in the kiln, with molten ash flowing freely over the surface. This is a perfect complement to a Japanese chashitsu tea room or traditional flower display. It is 24.5 cm (9-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. In a Japanese tea ceremony room, historically vases were made to match the ambiance of the humble setting. Although I did not write it: Starting in the Momoyama period (16th century), Mimitsuki Iga ware vases with characteristic "ear" lugs appeared. and thus became the popular norm. Since then the ears have become a mark of not only Iga flower vessels but also Mizusashi water jars. They were used as Japanese tea utensils under master Sen no Rikkyu and others. Old Iga ware, which is known as Ko-Iga, generally reflects Wabi-Sabi aesthetics with a rustic appearance and purposefully deformed shapes, given extra character by the addition of "ear" lugs and intentional gouges and dents.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1473156
The Kura
$1,600.00
Sale Pending
An early Edo period Ki-Seto sake cup repurposed with a silver lid pierced with a chrysanthemum to function as an incense burner enclosed in a custom made silk pouch and bamboo case dating the transformation to New Years of Kae-7 (1854). Without the lid it is 5.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1473114
The Kura
$1,500.00
Sale Pending
A rare stacking Bento (picnic) box in the shape of a tea leaf storage jar decorated in a realistic fashion with black, silver and gold maki-e lacquer. It consists of four pieces, stacked they are 28 cm (11 inches) tall, and all are in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1473106 (stock #TCR7105)
The Kura
$499.00
A lifelike turtle from the Kikko kilns of Osaka, the bottom stamped and covered in brown lacquer, the top traditional kikko ocher tinged colors. There are chips around the edges, without which it would be tough to define this hyper realistic piece as pottery. It is 16.5 x 11 x 6 cm (6-1/2 inches long), dating from the later Edo period. The Kikko Kiln was established in Osaka in the opening years of the 19th century by Iyo native Toda Jihe, who had learned the ceramic arts in Kyoto under all of the great names of the time, Kiyomizu Rokubei I, Ryonyu the 9th generation head of the Raku family, and Ninnami Dohachi among others. He would be known as Jusanken Shogetsu. After being noticed by then Daimyo of Osaka area Mizuno Tadakuni, he received the kiln name Kikko. His works were distributed as gifts among the Daimyo, and he was called to work in many fiefs creating “Niwa Yaki” kilns throughout Japan. During the Meiji the kiln would be split into two continuing lineages, one using Jusanken stamp, the other Kikko Shogetsu.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1920 item #1473099
The Kura
$2,200.00
A bronze crane in dark almond colored patina of superb craftsmanship dating from the late 19th to early 20th century (Meiji period). It is quite large at 48.5 cm tall (19 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1800 item #1472981
The Kura
$900.00
An archaic bronze vessel in the shape of an open boat made for flower arranging called a Suiban (Water Basin) enclosed in an ancient black lacquered wooden box. It is 39 x 15 x 10 cm (15-1/2 x 6 x 4 inches) and in fine condition, certain to be a centerpiece of conversation.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1472954
The Kura
$399.00
An Edo period lacquered Bashaku Water Scoop covered in mother of pearl flakes decorated with the Kikusui-mon Crest in gold, vermilion lacquer within. It is 59.5 cm (roughly 2 feet) long and in overall fine condition with minor losses typical of age and use. The name Bashaku literally means horse scoop, and indicates these were used for watering horses on the road.
All Items : Antiques : Furnishings : Accessories : Boxes : Pre 1920 item #1472904
The Kura
$550.00
A stylish Tabaco-bon in the shape of a boat made of precious hardwoods such as rosewood, black persimmon and Zelkova dating from the Taisho era. The decorative white “nails” are ivory, of which one is missing (see close-ups). Originally made to hold tobacco leaves and a burning coal, two covered compartments are lined with copper, so it could double as a vase. In front a roundel of bamboo, originally the pipe tap, rises like a chimney. The boat is 48 cm long (19 inches). Although there is a (stable) crack in one of the Jindai-sugi wooden lids, overall, it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1472869 (stock #MOR8279)
The Kura
$600.00
An ancient wooden bowl covered in hundreds of layers of lacquer, dribbling down the outside, and built up thick about the rim, hollowed out in the center of the bowl where the actual mixing would have taken place. There is a chip to one edge, revealing the layers of black and crimson lacquer. An incredible piece replete with a vivid sense of the craftsman’s hands. It is slightly elongated with age, 27.5 x 30 x 14.5 cm (10-1/2 x 12 x 5-1/2 inches).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1472430
The Kura
$1,500.00
Sale Pending
Rustic Irabo style glaze covers this Edo period Hidaka-yaki Mizusashi covered in a black lacquered tsukuibuta sculpted wood lid. It is 15.5 cm (6 inches) diameter, 16cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The piece is published in the book Kishu Zenmyoji yaki (1986) figure 46. A copy of the book is included. It comes enclosed in an old wooden storage box with separate compartment for the lid.
This type of earthenware is from one of the commissioned kilns of the Kishu Domain. Also known as Zenmyoji-yaki, the kiln was established by Genryo, the 6th generation chief priest of Zenmyoji in Shima Village in Hidaka Country, during the Kyoho era (1716 – 1735).
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1472380 (stock #L003)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted wooden tray covered in black lacquer carved in the Kamakura Bori tradition from the Hakkodo Studio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kamakura Bori Kashi Bachi Hana Karakusa (Kamakura Carved Vessel with Scrolling Flower Design). It is 36.5 x 26.5 x 5.5 cm (14-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
In the 12th-13th centuries, when Kamakura prospered as the samurai capital, Zen Buddhism was introduced from China, and many Zen temples were built, including Kamakura Gozan. The architectural style of these temples was modeled after the Tang style of China and he interior decoration, furniture, and Buddhist altar fittings were similarly Tang style. Along with Zen. celadons, bronze vases, Tsuishu and other cultural objects were brought from China. Tsuishu is a vessel formed only with layers of lacquer, and a pattern is carved on the surface. A very time-consuming process, these usually small articles were highly valued. Wood-carved lacquered incense cases imitating this were made by carving a vessel of wood and applying lacquer to finish it. This is believed to be the beginning of Kamakura-bori, and it is accepted that it was made by a Buddhist sculptors for temples. In the Momoyama period, the design and carving became dynamic and deep moving away from imitation to an art form of its own. In the Edo period, we can see a growth in production, with even everyday items such as tea utensils and braziers being produced, as well as larger secular works such as trays and even small furnishings. Around this time, the name 'Kamakura-bori' began to appear in books dealing with tea utensils. The Goto family, the current head of Hakkodo, descended from the Kei school of Buddhist sculptors who came from Nara to create Buddhist statues for Zen Buddhist temples. Due to the Meiji government's edict to abolish Buddhism, they moved to revive and reinvent the Meiji Kamakura-bori. From the Meiji through the Taisho and into the Showa era, new techniques were developed and established as a field of crafts. After the war, Kamayama Mitsuhashi and Shuntaro Goto formed an association, and in 1977, Kamakura Bori was designated a traditional craft.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1472342
The Kura
sold, thank you
A ceramic box decorated with red and white camellia blossoms on vivid green dating from the early 20th century and bearing the artist seal on the base. It is glazed with pale earthen white inside, bearing a design of interlocked rings on the lid, and a huge flower inside the basin. It is 18.5 x 18.5 x 11 cm (7-1/4 x 7-1/4 x 4-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1472326
The Kura
$1,150.00
A worked copper octagonal incense burner showing strong Korean influence both in the construction and in the designs piercing the lid. It is 11.5 x 14 x 14 cm (4-1/2 x 5-1/2 x 5-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1472307
The Kura
sold, thank you
A vibrant landscape separated by crimson clouds surrounds this koro signed in gold Seifu-zo surmounted by a fabulous solid silver lid. It is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Seifū Yohei I (1801-1861) was born the son of a Samurai in Kanazawa however aspired to be a potter. In 1815, he moved to Kyoto where he apprenticed under Nin'nami Dōhachi (1783-1855). He opened a studio in Fushimi before establishing another studio in the Gojōzaka pottery district. In 1847 the lord of Bizen invited him to assist at the Mushiage kiln. After returning to Kyoto he established another kiln, eventually passing this on to the second generation Seifu. He was a known literatus, and many works decorated by painters and scholars were made by him. He is held in the collection of The Met New York and the British Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1472306 (stock #OC055)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted image of a pheasant by Ogawa Yuhei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 37 cm long and in excellent condition.
Yuhei Ogawa (1885-1945) was born in Takamatsu, Okayama prefecture an came to pottery a bit later than most. In 1923, while working part time at the Naval Hydrographic Department, he was deeply moved by seeing the solo exhibition of ceramic sculptor Kazumasa Numata. This gave him impetus to begin sculpting in his free time. Although he started his career as an artist late at the age of 37, he was selected for the opening exhibition of the newly established arts and crafts department at the Teiten National Exhibition in 1927, and frequently thereafter. He participated in the activities of the Totokai, a group of potters living in the Kanto region, with Itaya Hazan, Numata Kazumasa and Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan II serving as advisors, and played an active role as a central artist. In 1934 he was invited to Iwaki Glass Factory as an advisor and created pottery sculptures and glass works for the rest of his life. A sculpture of a black panther is held in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1472154
The Kura
$335.00
A classical set of 5 cups in deeply crackled glaze decorated with variously colored strips in the traditional Mugiwara fashion popular in and around the ancient capitol of Kyoto. Each is roughly 7 cm tall; 9 cm diameter and they are in excellent condition, dating from the late 19th to early 20th century.