The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1455888 (stock #TCR8291)
The Kura
Price on Request
At last! A Shigaraki Tsubo with fabulous patina and infused color garnered over centuries of use. Stylistically it is consistent with the 15th century, Muromachi period. This dating is viewed from quality and consistency of clay, wear, rim shape, and thickness. Surface colors range from pale gray to red with remnants of green ash glaze. It is exceedingly rare to find a Tsubo of this age without significant damage, and it has been top on my list for several years now. There are minor chips around the rim typical of age, no cracks. It is 37 cm tall and comes in a custom-made storage box of good quality, thick kiri wood.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1900 item #1455780 (stock #TCR8287)
The Kura
Price on Request
Sale Pending
A pale glazed Kyo-yaki ceramic figurine of a rabbit by Takahashi Dohachi III decorated across the back with a poem by the poet-nun Otagaki Rengetsu. The poem reads:
Usagira ga Rabbits
gamanoho-iro no kegoromo wa Fur robes the color of cattails...
kamiyo nagara ni ki kae zaru ran. Remain un-changed since the age of Gods.
This was crafted by a professional potter, the brushwork by Rengetsu, much crisper than normal thanks to the smooth surface and higher grade materials at teh Dohachi Kiln. Signed on the rump: 77 year old Rengetsu, the figure bearing the stamp of Takahashi Dohachi III on the base. It is roughly 19 x 13 x 19 cm (7-1/2 x 5 x 7-1/2 inches). There is a chip in the tip of the right ear, otherwise is in excellent original condition.
Otagaki Rengetsu was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I. Following the early death of his older brother he succeeded the family name, opening a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles. Along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. An exhibition was held at the Suntory Museum in 2014 centering on this artist, and he is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among many, many others. The third generation (1811-1879) was known as Kachutei Dohachi and continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the annals of Kyoto ceramics. He was followed by the fourth generation (1845-1897), and his sons Takahashi Dohachi V (1845-1897) who took control of the kiln in 1897 until 1915 when his younger brother Dohachi VI (Kachutei) (1881-1941) continued the business.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1455753 (stock #MOR8288)
The Kura
$550.00
A large basket of braided white bamboo signed Seiseisai and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The sparse weave of open braids is a dramatic statement. It is 48 cm (19 inches) tall and in excellent original condition. It has not been polished, being offered with the patina as found.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1930 item #1455738 (stock #MOR8287)
The Kura
$1,200.00
An elegant basket of open weave enclosed in the original signed wooden box by Yamamoto Chikuryusai I dating prior to his name change in 1929. Signed beneath, it is 22 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter, 46 cm (18 inches) tall and in excellent condition, retaining the original bamboo otoshi insert.
Yamamoto Chikuryusai I (1868-1945) was a bamboo artist of the early modern era in Osaka. Born in year one of the Meiji era to the Yanagi clan, his former Samurai family hailed from Yodo, a castle town between Osaka and Kyoto. He later was adopted by his Sister in Law to the Yamamoto family, changing his name to Yamamoto at the time, however it was with his older brother, Yanagi Takesada that he learned basketry in their shop in Osaka. Takesada moved to Korea; for the Japanese at the time it was the New West, but Chikuryusai remained in Japan. Unlike others, Chikuryusai did not attempt to insert himself into his baskets, but, allowed his baskets a traditional elegance. He was renowned for his calligraphy, sencha aesthetic, and his elegant and reserved artistic vision. His baskets received awards at several important international expositions, and, with his two sons, Chikuryusai II and Chikken, participated in the annual Teiten/Bunten National Art Exhibitions. He served as mentor to not only his two sons but also Hamano Chikkosai, Ikeda Seiryusai, and Suemura Shobun. In 1929, he gave the artist “Go” (name) to his son but continued working under the name Shoen until his death in 1945. Work by him is held in the Asian Art Museum San Francisco, The Minneapolis Institute of Art and The Met New York among many other public and private collections.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1455711 (stock #TCR8285)
The Kura
$375.00
Sale Pending
A blue parrot perches atop a stone, a near life-size porcelain okimono signed on the base Shunyo. It is 33 cm (13 inches) tall. There is a small chip in the central bridge of the tail feather (see close-up photo) otherwise is in excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1455692 (stock #TCR8284)
The Kura
$1,600.00
Sale Pending
A Hakuji white-porcelain Stupa shaped reliquary bearing a bonji (Sanskrit character) by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated the third month of Showa 13 (1938). The character in raised relief is that for Dainichi Nyorai, the central deity in Esoteric Buddhism (Mikkyo). The tower is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The third Kozan took control after the death of Hanzan in 1940, however he died and the kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1455595 (stock #TCR8283)
The Kura
$2,300.00
A very unusual swirling celadon vase with vibrantly colored floral belt by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan signed on the base in a chattered circle Makuzu Kozan Sei. It is 22.5 cm (9 inches) diameter, 30 cm (12 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition, with two miniscule glaze chips (see close-up photo).
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1455560 (stock #MOR8281)
The Kura
$1,500.00
Cranes soar along the rim of this Nashiji covered lacquer bowl decorated with the festive Shochikubai motif (plum, pine and bamboo) in gold and silver maki-e with a five petaled plum blossom crest dating from the Edo period, 18th to early 19th century. Inside is crimson red, and it comes enclosed in a period red-lacquered wooden box. It is 12.3 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1455559 (stock #TCR8280)
The Kura
$750.00
The fortuitous accident, something has collapsed against the shoulder of this vessel causing it to crumple in on one side, the pale gathering about the fused raw earth and cascading like a waterfall down over the dark glaze. Such calamities within the kiln, which create the unexpected, are not looked upon as failures, but celebrated as serendipitous events. Here the bottle has been challenged and comes out intact, if not scarred from the experience, much like we in our own lives. It is 23.5 cm (9-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It likely hails from the Agano region, 19th century. A great example of the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi. After all, what would be the fun if all turned out just as we planned?
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1455522 (stock #MOR8279)
The Kura
$1,200.00
An ancient wooden bowl covered in hundreds of layers of lacquer, dribbling down the outside, and built up thick about the rim, hollowed out in the center of the bowl where the actual mixing would have taken place. There is a chip to one edge, revealing the layers of black and crimson lacquer. An incredible piece replete with a vivid sense of the craftsman’s hands. It is slightly elongated with age, 27.5 x 30 x 14.5 cm (10-1/2 x 12 x 5-1/2 inches).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1910 item #1455465 (stock #TCR8278)
The Kura
$150.00
Sale Pending
Two small porcelain dishes designed by Tanomura Chokunyu and created by Tominaga Genroku dating from the Meiji period. The landscape is signed Chokunyu in the blank of the lake, while underneath in a square cartouche is the mark of Genroku. Typically called Memezara in Japan, they are 12 cm (5 inches) diameter, perfect for zensai hors-d'œuvre or small treats to accompany a meal.
Tominaga Genroku (1859-1920) did much to promote the porcelains of Saga prefecture, not only from his own kiln, but as a member of the Saga government.
Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) was born in Oita (the Oka Feif) and studied initially under Okamoto Baisetsu before moving to paint under the famous literatus Tanomura Chikuden (1777-1835), who adopted him as a son and had a very strong influence on the young artist. Upon Chikudens death he also studied briefly under Oshio Chusai (1792-1837) then finally ventured out on his own upon that teachers passing. He was a strong proponent of the Literati and Sencha movements, and decorated many items for use in that realm. He moved to Kyoto, where he helped found the Kyoto Municipal School of painting and eventually withdrew from the world, becoming an Obaku Zen Monk in 1902.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1455455 (stock #MOR8277)
The Kura
$420.00
Sale Pending
A large Sake bottle covered in black lacquer mellowed to a dark chocolate color with age decorated with floral sprays in gold and silver maki-e dating from Edo period Japan. The square jug is very elegant, not overly decorated, the execution of the motif belies the exacting technique and imbues it with a sense of the spontaneous, flowers bursting open with the changing of the seasons. Upon the top is written the characters Sensoku (Senzoku or alternatively read Senbiki) and could indicate it was originally used by or for the service of sake made by the famous Sensoku family brewery in Imazu, or that it belonged to a family by that name. The bottle is complete with lid. It is roughly 15 cm (5-3/4 inches) square, 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in overall fine condition considering age and use. The base has been once re-lacquered, sometime long in the past. There is one chip to the tip of the handle sticking out one side (see close up photo). (The white line visible in the photographs is a reflection of the edge of the backdrop)
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1455447 (stock #MOR8276)
The Kura
$750.00
Sale Pending
Tarnished silver alternates with nashiji (gold powder dusted) columns rising to the fluted chrysanthemum shaped lid of this three tiered box covered with an ami-me net of gold dating from the later Edo period (early 19th century). The outer design intimates the piece is wrapped in a golden net pouch, tied closed at the top. The boxes assembled are 19.5 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall, 11.5 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter and it comes protected in a wooden storage box. There are very minor chips around the fluted edges, and one chip to the tip of one petal on the lid, but is overall in great condition considering the age.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1454775 (stock #MOR8271)
The Kura
$1,400.00
Plovers soar over crashing waves on this exquisite gold and silver lacquered tray enclosed in an age darkened period kiri-wood box titled Nami-Chidori Maki-e Hirobuta (Plover and Wave Lacquer Tray) signed by the Suiseishujin (Master of the Kingfisher Hermitage). The waves are created with a number of brush techniques, a powerful scene punctuated with tiny silver beads. Each bird is intricately depicted with a unique expression. Altogether a mighty scene of tempestuous movement. The artist has not only decorated the inside of the tray with this spectacular imagery, but also the sides and bottom with a quieter shoreline; the sand and gravel scattered with sea seashells. The tray is 48.5 x 32 x 4 cm (19 x 12-1/2 x 1-1/2 inches). There are some minor scratches on the base typical of use, otherwise is in a fine state of preservation.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1453733 (stock #TCR5110)
The Kura
$800.00
A lovely pair of matching Tea pots for Chinese steeped tea decorated by the eccentric artist Kai Kozan, each wrapped in a sarasa bag and enclosed in a compartmentalized wooden box signed by the artist. They are roughly 3 inches (7.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition.
Kai Kozan (1867-1961) was from the land of the literati, Oita prefecture. In 1880 he entered the studio of Hoashi Kyo-u. In 1896 he married Kai Wariko, (daughter of a Honganji Buddhist scholar and graduate of Doshisha Women’s University), and together they helped to establish in 1899 a school for women based on Buddhist principles, and in 1900 BunChuEn JoGakko, what would become Kyoto Womens University and he served as a professor there while maintaining a scholar’s lifestyle throughout his long life.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1453124 (stock #MOR8252)
The Kura
$900.00
A fabulous little bronze figure of a golden-eyed Tanuki dressed in priests robes dozing on a large prayer drum signed on the base what appears to be Yoshiyuki. The round drum is finished in a soft red color, while the figure itself is olive with brilliant gold eyes. It is 17 cm (6-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1960 item #1453094 (stock #MOR8250)
The Kura
$1,850.00
A brilliant large bronze vase signed Bisho reflecting the Art Deco aesthetic enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Jundo Kaki (Pure Bronze Vase). It is 38 cm (15 inches) tall, 25.7 x 15 cm (10 x 6 inches) across the base and in excellent condition. Yoneda Bisho (1927-2008) was a bronze artist based in the Takaoka region active from the immediate post-war into the modern era. His innovative designs were initially based in the mid-century Art Deco revival but slowly veered to be very much his own designs. Two pieces are held in the Takaoka Municipal Museum of Art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1453033 (stock #TCR8248)
The Kura
$925.00
Butterflies drift over autumn flowers on this Ryoro brazier by Mizukoshi Yosanbei enclosed in a period wooden box endorsed later by Iemoto Watanabe Sokei of the Shogetsu Ryu School of Tea preparation. The pale Kyo-yaki glaze has been sprayed with silver (fuki-e style) over which the insects and flora have been depicted in enamel colors. Impressed into the foot ring is the Yosanbei seal. It is 26 cm (10-1/4 inches) tall, 13.5 cm (5-1/4 inches) diameter. It comes with a new removable bisk fired liner in perfect condition. There are minor nicks around the inside lip where the liner rests, but the Ryoro itself is overall in excellent condition. The box has been annotated by Watanabe Sokei, Iemoto (head) of the Shogetsu-ryu School of Sencha Tea preparation and comes with a note explaining a brief history of the Mizukoshi family pottery hand written and signed by Sokei, in an envelope from the Shogetsu School. The first generation Mizukoshi Yosanbei (also read Yosanhei) was born the son of a wealthy merchant named Sugiura Ninzo in the Sanjo (central) deistric of Kyoto, but was slated to succeed his mothers household (for lack of heirs presumably) so received his mothers maiden name Mizukoshi. He apprenticed in potteryunder the Raku specialist Okazaki (Jinraku) Bunzan. He was proficient in many styles of popular Tea ware including Nanban, Karatsu and Hagias well as Ninsei and other Kyo-yaki styles. He used a five sided seal with the haracters Yosan inside. It is known that potters including Okeya Isaburo from Kutani came to study under him in 1822, so he must have had considerable influence in the later Edo period. He was succeeded by two generations, however the kiln closed during the chaotic fall of the Bakufu (Shogunate) in the 1860s.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1452869 (stock #TCR8247)
The Kura
$1,250.00
A Gasaku joint effort by Kyoto porcelain master Takahashi Dohachi V and Scholar artist Tomioka Tessai (1837-1924) dating from the late Meiji to Taisho period enclosed in a period wooden box. Enigmatic Characters among scholarly figures in cobalt strike firmly from the smooth alabaster surface. Each cup is 5.5 cm (2 inches) and in perfect condition but for onewhich has a slight nick in the rim. The poems dashed out on the bowls are followed by the signature Tessai Gai-shi, and each is signed inside the foot ring Dohachi. Takahashi Dohachi was one in the line of great porcelain masters of Kyoto. The family began potting in the 18th century, and was brought to the forefront of porcelain by the second generation head of the family. From then it was known as one of the top three families in Kyoto for porcelain production. The fifth generation took control of the kiln in 1897. Tomioka Tessai was a scholar artist trained from age seven in the traditional Confucian manner. After the death of his father he was apprenticed to a Shinto shrine, and later moved to work under Otagaki Rengetsu, from whom he was heavily influenced. He held a number of important positions, culminating in being appointed the official painter of the Emperor and a member of the Imperial Art Academy; the highest honor in Japanese Art circles. He was known to have worked with Dohachi in porcelains, as well as Eiraku Zengoro, Suwa Sozan and Kiyomizu Rokubei.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1452571 (stock #TCR8240)
The Kura
$600.00
A rare set of small early earthy dishes by Kiyomizu Rokubei VII enclosed in the original wooden box signed Hiroshi titled Ki-yu Meme-zzara roku-iri (6 Yellow Glazed Small Dishes). Dating from the 1950s, the shapes are flawless, and show the mastery of design for which this artist would become known. They are 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Kyubei (1922-2006) was born Tsukamoto Hiroshi in Nagoya. He graduated from Nagoya Industrial High School (now the Nagoya Institute of Technology), majoring in architecture. Coming of age during the war years was not easy. he worked in glass and metal before being adopted into the Kiyomizu family in 1951. In 1953 he graduated from the Tokyo University of the Arts, majoring in metal casting. In 1958 he continued his studies of sculpture under under Shigeru Senno, while working in clay at the Rokubei kiln. In 1963 he became an assistant professor at the Kyoto City University of Arts, advancing to full professor in 1968. He then took a one year sabbatical in Italy and since has received many prizes including the 17th Mainichi Arts Award in 1976 and the Excellence Award at the Henry Moore Grand Prize Exhibition in 1979. He succeeded as head of the Kiyomizu Family in 1980, relinquishing the reins to his son Masahiro in 2000. According to the catalog from the recent Kyubei/Kazuo exhibition “The works by Kiyomizu Hiroshi dating from the 1950s display handsome, geometric forms. Design like consideration is a sensibility shared by many ceramicists today and he gives us an impression that he was ahead of his time. The National Museums of Modern Art in Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka hold 16 works by this important artist.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1900 item #1455754 (stock #MOR8289)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A complex spiraling weave of flattened susudake (smoke stained) enclosed in an old wooden box titled Karamono Take Kumi Hira Sumitori (Wide Woven Bamboo Charcoal Basket in Chinese Style). It is 30 cm (12 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, retaining the original lacquered paper liner. Sumitori baskets, as the name implies, were used to carry charcoal for use during the Japanese Tea Ceremony. This likely dates from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1455733 (stock #TCR8286)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
This little guy is just about the cutest thing I have ever seen. A tiny mouse rests atop a bulging white radish, bristling blue leaves in full detail attached as if pulled fresh from the ground. Dating from the 19th century (later Edo to early Meiji period), it comes enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Daikon Nezumi Futamono (Radish/Mouse Lidded Receptacle). I confess in over 25 years dealing in Japanese art and antiques I have never seen one like it. It is in excellent condition. Unlike in the west, the mouse is viewed as a symbol of fortune, as mice only gather in homes where there is an abundance of food. The Daikon radish as well, is a symbol of fortune as it grows rapidly. If someone does not scream Kawaii I will not be able to take it!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1455393 (stock #TCR8275)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
A set of Kyoyaki Tokkuri with iron decoration on heavily crackled pale glaze, one bearing a young pine bough brushed by Maruyama Oshin, the other a verse dedicated to the pine by an unidentified poet. Although most of the script is illegible to me, it begins Kadonomatsu (Pine by the gate) and appears to be signed Jukei (Chukei). They are 17 cm (6-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Maruyama Oshin (1790-1838) was a son of Maruyama Oju, the second son of Maruyama Okyo, founder of the Maruyama school of painting. He was adopted into the main branch of the family, eventually become the third head of the Maruyama line. He frequently incorporated Japanese poems in his work. Held in the collections of the British Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, Brooklyn Museum Boston, Los Angeles, National Gallery of Victoria and the Kyoto National Museum (Hakubutsukan) among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1455375 (stock #MOR8274)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A stunning boxed set of sake cups decorated with shishi lions frolicking among blossoming peonies upon thick golden rocks, the flora wrapping around the outside of each cup. The technique is unparalleled. A look at the detail photos will say more than I can about this incredible set. They are 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and both are in excellent condition. They come wrapped in antique silk pouches enclosed in a period compartmentalized lacquered wooden storage box dating from the late Edo to early Meiji period, 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1454963 (stock #TCR8273)
The Kura
Sold, with thanks!
An unusual pottery vase of raw earth decorated with huddled white Sagi (Crested Ibis) beyond a berm of iron by Miyagawa Kozan bearing the artists seal on the base. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 15.5 cm (6-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1454933 (stock #TCR8272)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A porcelain vase decorated with bamboo by Miyagawa Kozan II signed on the base Makuzu Kozan Sei in a chattered double ring. It is 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1454748 (stock #MBR8270)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A wispy bearded sage clutches his staff, robes draped loosely about his emaciated frame as he peers ahead in interest, a curious smile on his wizened visage. The figure is beautifully crafted with a slightly textured patina and signed on the base Seiko. Slight wear to the base reveals the pure gold of the underlying bronze. It is 36.5 cm (14-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1454671 (stock #MOR8269)
The Kura
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An intricately woven Karamono basket in unusual Hishigata (Diamond Shape) by Noguchi Ushu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The handle is a single long architectural element of split bamboo which rises from the tapering diamond frame. Ornate tightly woven knots decorate the peak. The basket is 28 x 20 x 48 cm (11 x 8 x 19 inches) and is in excellent condition. It is branded on the base Ushu. A strikingly similar work is held in the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, although I believe the piece offered here has better knotting (please check for yourself).
Noguchi Ushu was born in Kusatsu City, Shiga prefecture on the shores of lake Biwa just north of Kyoto in 1947, third generation in a family of traditional bamboo artists. He learned bamboo craft from his father and grandfather, with an emphasis on Chinese knotting and design. He was awarded at the 18th Bamboo Craft Exhibition held in Kyoto, and his work has been exhibited in many of Japan’s top venues.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1454404 (stock #MOR8265)
The Kura
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Sunlight, an openwork bamboo flower basket by Living National Treasure Maeda Chikubosai II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yoko Kaki (Sunlight Flower Vase). The vessel is created with susudake (smoked bamboo) and rattan, twined, knotted and wrapped then lacquered. It is signed on the bottom and stands 27 cm (11 inches) tall, in excellent condition. It retains the original Otoshi lacquered bamboo receptacle inside.
Maeda Chikubosai II (1917-2003), was born when his father, Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was already quite mature. Initially he studied plaiting techniques from younger artists in the family studio, and once mastered studied under his father, and Yamamoto Chikuryosai I (Shoen), becoming an independent artist in 1941 and succeeding to the Chikubosai name in 1950. He was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition in 1953, and exhibited there consistently as well as in the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten). He was honored by the Japanese government in 1992, and was named a Living National Treasure for the bamboo crafts in 1995. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo and a strikingly similar basket by the same name is held in the Johnson Museum of Art attached to Cornell University.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1454163 (stock #MOR8264)
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A beautiful basket of intricate design by Kosuge Kogetsu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The modernist weave begins top and bottom in a standard curtain of bamboo, but a woven belt disrupts the flow, and bindings draw the plaits together revealing the inner bamboo Otoshi again and again and again. The vase is 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Kosuge Kogetsu (1932-1916) was a third-generation bamboo artist born in Niigata and trained under his father Kosuge Chikudo, exhibiting his first work in 1951 and garnering his first awards in 1953 and 54. In 1956 he was awarded governors prize at the National Flower and Tea Exhibition (KakiChaki Bijutsu Kogei Ten). In 1967 his submission to the Nitten National Exhibition was purchased by the Japanese Government and displayed at the embassy in Geneva. The following year his first solo exhibitions was held. Following he was requested to make 150 baskets as governmental gifts for the 1970 world exposition held in Osaka. In 1972 one of his creations was gifted to the Showa Emperor. Subsequently his work was regularly exhibited in top venues throughout Japan.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1454140 (stock #TCR8262)
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Flowers of the four seasons blossom in a cacophony of color over the entirety of this Kutani vase signed from the pre-eminent Kaburaki (Kaburagi) studio dating from the opening of the 20th century. The imagery is exquisitely performed with over-glaze enamels on a sheer white ground. The vase is large at 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition, with some wear to the gold rim. It comes enclosed in an old custom made kiri-wood box.
Kaburaki, along with Yoshidaya, were the preeminent studios producing Kutani from the 19th to early 20th century. Kutani-yaki originated in a village called Kutani in Ishikawa Prefecture in the 17th century and was revived in Kanazawa in the early 19th century by the ruling Maeda family. It was in 1822 that Jisuke Kaburaki opened the very first kutani pottery shop. Over the years Kaburaki Kutani products gained a reputation for excellence both at home and abroad. Today the eighth generation of the family, Motoyoshi Kaburaki, continues this family business.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1454001 (stock #TCR8261)
The Kura
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An image of the sleeping Shojo (sake Sprite) by the 12th generation Sakaida Kakiemon enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taihaku Shojo Bori Okimono. The ordinarily playful figure is performed in pure white, a serene look upon his sleeping face creating an almost holy feeling, the ladle fallen at his knee, leaning against a barrel of sake, the empty jar the only color. The image is 31 x 21 x 16 cm (12 x 8 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition. Sakaida Kakiemon (1878-1963) was born the first son of the 11th generation head of the Sakaida family, and learned from his father, succeeding the family name in 1917. Rediscovering the Nigoshide technique was his life’s research, and together with his son grasped the essentials in 1947, presenting the first piece for public viewing in 1953. The Nigoshide technique was subsequently named an important cultural property, and the Kakiemon family designated the carriers of the tradition. Held in the collection of The Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, Seattle Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1453884 (stock #MOR4818)
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A silver rabbit and large solid bronze figure of the young god O-kuninushi no Mikado by Oshima Joun on a black lacquered stand enclosed in the original signed and red lacquered wooden box with separate compartments for the table and figure. Here we see O-kuninushi seated beside his bundle of belongings, hand extended in benevolence to the meek creature. The box is titled O-kuninushi Go-Zo, Go Okimono, Tobu Oshimia Joun Sakku followed by a ka-o signature. Inside is written the characters SoNeKo(Shi)ShakuDen(Tono). The inscription infers some Imperial event at which this was given (The character Shaku is the same as the UjinoShaku Imperial visit held after New years when commoners who have excelled in the previous year are granted an audience with the Emperor). There are two patches of fresh lacquer inside the lid, indicating a name and possible date of the recipient have been erased. The bronze figure is 8-1/2 inches (22 cm) tall and weighs 4.5 kg (9-1/2 lbs). The rabbit is solid silver, 28 grams. Both are in fine condition.
I believe the story tells of a young god Onamuji (who would become O-kuninushi) and eight of his fellows who left Izumo seeking the hand of princess Yakami of Inaba. He being the youngest and kindest of the group, was left to carry the baggage. As the men reached the coast, they found a rabbit stripped of fur and bleeding. So as a prank they told him to wash in the sea and dry himself in the sun. Of course this caused the rabbit much pain, until Onamuji arrived (delayed with the heavy bags), and told the hare to wash himself in the clean rivers of the stream and roll in the billowing seeds of the cat-tails. The rabbit quickly recovered, and made a prediction to the lad that indeed Yakami would fall in love with him above all others despite his appearing as a servant.
Oddly the story does not end there, and one must pity the princess, for the other men kill Onamuji (several times and he is several times revived) and he is forced to flee to the underworld, where he falls in love with King Susano’s daughter and elopes with her. The grand Shrine at Izumo, one of the oldest and most important in Japan, is dedicated to Okuninushi, and he is believed to be the builder of nations.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1453752 (stock #TCR8257)
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An unusual porcelain bowl stamped on the base Taizan and decorated with old masks in cobalt pigment by the well-known carver Ichikawa Tetsuro enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated mid-summer of 1928. Between each mask, engraved into the surface but not colored is what appears to be a description of each mask and where it is held (for example Todaiji Temple). The artists signature is also engraved in this manner. The bowl is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Ichikawa Tetsuro (1901-1987) was born in Tokyo and apprenticed in wood carving in the ancient capitol Nara under Kano Tessai (1845-1925), becoming one of his last and most accomplished students. He received the name Tetsuro (taking the first character of his teachers name) at the age of 22.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1453734 (stock #TCR8256)
The Kura
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A beautiful Kyo-satsuma vase exquisitely decorated in various enamels and gilt signed on the base with a Satsuma mark and the name Matsumoto Hozan. A mother and daughter view flowers along the shore in the shade of delicately rendered bamboo opposite pigeons under seeding flowers along a stream. The two scenes are separated by scrolling vines bursting with flowers and floral windows in vivid gold on Prussian blue. It is 20 cm (7-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent overall great condition with minor wear to the gold rim typical of use.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1453731 (stock #TCR4840)
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A set of five porcelain tea cups by Ninnami Dohachi decorated with bamboo and poetry by Nukina Kaioku (Suo) enclosed in a superb custom period kiri-wood box with rosewood edges. Each cup is 2 inches (5 cm) tall, 2-1/2 inches (6 cm) diameter. There are old gold repairs to two of the cups, otherwise are in fine condition.
Nukina Kaioku (1778-1863) was born into a samurai family in Awa, on the island of Shikoku a patron of the Hachisuka clan. In frail health, he was excluded from the strict rigours of the martial arts, but was trained in the typical Confucian education based on Chinese classics, painting and calligraphy, at which he excelled. He went to Koyasan to study Buddhism, Literati arts in Nagasaki and advanced Confucian studies in Edo(Tokyo). He settled in Kyoto where he established the Shuseido Academy teaching Confucian studies, and his circle was extremely influential in the waning days of the Edo government, especially among loyalists. Works by this artist can be found in the British Museum, Brooklyn Museum, The Walters Art Museum, Honolulu Museum, as well as a plethora of domestic museums in cluding MOMAT, Homma, Imabari, Itabayashi etc.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto.
Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I in Kyoto. He opened a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles, along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. He is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among others.
The third generation (1811-1879) was known as Kachutei Dohachi and continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the anals of Kyoto ceramics well into the Meiji period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1453328 (stock #TCR8255)
The Kura
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A unique set of 7 nesting katakuchi bowls with serving spouts in various glaze techniques by Kiyomizu Rokubei IV enclosed in a period wooden box annotated by the fifth generation Rokubei, the inscription dated Autumn of 1943. The smallest cup is 5.5-6 cm diameter, the largest 15-16 cm diameter. The largest bowl has been broken and repaired with gold lacquer; the others are all in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei IV (1848-1920) was born the first son of Rokubei III and headed the family kiln from 1883-1913.He studied painting in the Shijo manner under Shiiokawa Bunrin and had a brotherly relationship with his fellow student Kono Bairei (under whom his own son would study painting). He sought to revitalize the pottery tradition of Kyoto, bringing in new techniques and styles and together with artists like Asai Chu and Nakazawa Iwata took part in the Entoen group and with Kamizaka Sekka the Keitobi-kai. He also held a strong relationship with literati artists such as Tomioka Tessai and together with these artists produced many joint works. He fell ill in 1902, finally handing the reins over to the 5th generation in 1913.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1900 item #1453322 (stock #TCR4866)
The Kura
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An important and rare Fushinayaki Pottery Sencha tea brazier Rodai decorated by Tanomura Chokunyu and made in the former castle kiln of Izumo province. A simple hut is shaded by a grand tree at the foot of a tree covered mountain accompanied by a poem in Kanshi. The tile was meant to be placed under a Ryoro brazier for making steeped tea. It is 7 inches (18 cm) square, 1 inch (2 cm) thick. It bears two stamps beneath, Isumo Jakuzan and Eizo, and is dated Meiji 12 (1879) in red. About the signature are what appear to be tangled plum branches in raised white. This date was one year before the kiln went public and began producing pottery for export. It is auspicious, and very likely that the great Tanomura was asked to assist with the kiln going public. The box is titled Unshu Fushina yaki, Sensei Chokunyu Kyoshi Seisho, Rodai. Inside it is annotated by Hirao Chikka in 1933 on the right, an unknown person on the let, possibly one of the sons of Chikunyu although the word for father here is ambiguous.
Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) was born in Oita (the Oka Feif) and studied initially under Okamoto Baisetsu before moving to paint under the famous literatus Tanomura Chikuden (1777-1835), who adopted him as a son and had a very strong influence on the young artist. Upon Chikudens death he also studied briefly under Oshio Chusai (1792-1837) then finally ventured out on his own upon that teachers passing. He was a strong proponent of the Literati and Sencha movements, and decorated many items for use in that realm. He moved to Kyoto, where he helped found the Kyoto Municipal School of painting and eventually withdrew from the world, becoming an Obaku Zen Monk in 1902. For more on his influence on tea and the literati see “Sencha,Tea of the Sages” by Patricia Graham.
Fushina-yaki was the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue Han in modern day Izumo, established around 1764. It fell strongly under the aesthetic taste of Matsudaira Harusato (1751-1818) Daimyo of the province and tea master. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro.
Hirao Chikka (1856-1939) was born the son of a potter. At the age of 16 he went to Kyoto to train as a painter, first in the Shijo manner under Shiokawa Bunrin, and following the death of Bunrin, in the Nanga tradition under Tanomura Chokunyu. He travelled extensively withhis teacher and on his own, absorbing various local traditions. An important artist he assisted in the founding of the Nihon Nanga-in organization of painters.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1453292 (stock #TCR8254)
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A set of 20 fawn dappled Gohon cups decorated with blue Bell-flowers (Kikyo) by Kiyomizu Rokubei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gohon Kikyo Banchawan Nijuko Iri (Gohon Bell-Flower Bancha Tea Cup 20 piece Set). Inside the box is dated the 9th month of Taisho 11 (1922). The artis was very fond of this particular flower, and you will see it repeated often in his work. One cup has a small gold repair to the rim, (see close-up photos) otherwise they are all in perfect condition and come wrapped in the original stamped cloths.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1452868 (stock #TCR8246)
The Kura
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Delicately brushed landscapes accented with poetry decorate this set of cooling pots for Sencha Tea made by Heian Hakuun of Kyoto and decorated by literati artist Fuji Kaho enclosed in the original wooden box signed by both artists. They are 10.5 cm (4-1/4 inches) long and in excellent condition. Fuji Kaho was an artist from Yamaguchi trained in the literati tradition of Tanomura Chikuden under Tanaka Hakuin in Kyoto.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1452789 (stock #TCR8245)
The Kura
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A porcelain Tile used to support a Ryoro brazier by Hakuun of Kyoto decorated with vibrantly bristling bamboo by the literati painter Tanaka Hakuin enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The octagonal tile is hollow in the center to dissipate heat and allow it to sit evenly on Tatami matts if necessary. It is roughly 14.2 cm (5-1/2 inches) across and in excellent condition.
Tanaka Hakuin (birth name Nakagawa Keizaburo, 1866-1934) was born in Suruga, Shizuoka prefecture in the last years of the Edo period and became a student of Tanomura Chokunyu in Kyoto, the cultural heartland of Japan, at the age of 17. This was a tumultuous period as Western ideas and Technology were flooding into Japan. He was the top pupil of Chokunyu, working in the style of both Chikuden and his mentor. At this time he used the name Tanomura Hakuin. In 1900 he married and moved to Hofu city in Yamaguchi prefecture taking his wifes family name Tanaka as his surname, and thereafter was known as Tanaka Hakuin. He established a school for painting where he worked for his remaining years. Work by him is held in the Mori Art Museum and Honolulu.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1452788 (stock #TCR8244)
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A Sencha Tea brazier called a Ryoro made by Kiyomizu Shichibei of raw dark clay made to contain a burning ember and support a small tea pot. It is 14.5 cm (5-1/2 inches) tall, 10.5 cm (4-1/4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. Finding such raw pots in good condition is rare, as quite often the heat from the burning coal weakens the clay, and I was very happy to find an example by this rare artist.
Kiyomizu Shichibei I was born in Kyoto the first son of Kiyomizu Rokubei II (Koto Shojiro, 1790-1860). However, he handed over the family name to his younger brother, in 1839 established his own kiln in Kyoto taing the name Shichibei. In 1843 his father was requested by the Daimyo (warlord) of Nagaoka in Echigo (the 10th head of the Makino clan) to open a kiln which would be called Oyama-yaki (not to be confused with the Oyama-Yaki produced in the Shimane area under Rakuzan), and the following year Shichibei went to help assist in the establishment of the kiln and training of the potters. Hi swork is a blend between that of his faterhs and shows the influence of Aoi Mokubei and Ninnami Dohachi, with bold designs in blue and white porcelains being one of his specialties. The second generation Shichibei (1845-1918) continued the tradition, and was exhibited at the National Naikoku Hakurankai Industrial Exhibition and at the Paris World Exposition in 1878. Both generations were very strong in the Sencha Tea world and their works are in high demand.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1452641 (stock #TCR8243)
The Kura
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A breathtaking Taireiji pottery vase by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Chrysantheum in raised relief grow ghosly white on the soft pink surface. It is 32 cm 12-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Taireiji was the most important development by this innovative artist, and pieces are exceedingly rare.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1980 item #1452525 (stock #TCR8239)
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Natural imagery and geometric patterns in vibrant hues of blue and purple accent or overlay gold panels on this diamond faceted incense burner by Kiyomizu Rokubei VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It features a solid silver lid pierced with bursting pomegranates among leaves signed by the silver smith. The Koro is roughly 13 cm diameter and in excellent condition. The original box is enclosed in a protective outer red-lacquered kiri-wood box (nijubako), showing the importance weighed upon this piece.
The Kiyomizu family potters managed one of the most productive workshops in Kyoto’s Gojozaka district throughout the second half of the Edo period. From the Meiji they began producing tableware for export and special pieces for government-sponsored exhibitions under Rokubei IV. Rokubei V led the kiln into the 20th century, and his son, Rokubei VI (1901-1980), would assume lead in 1945, taking the kiln through the tumultuous years after the Second World War. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, then the Kyoto Special School of Painting, before apprenticing under his father in 1925. He exhibited frequently and was often prized at the National Bunten, Teiten and Nitten Exhibits, where he later served as judge. He was also lauded abroad, in the USSR, France, Italy, Belgium and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy. In 1976 he was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit for his lifelong devotion to promoting Japanese pottery traditions. His works are held in numerous museums throughout the globe.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1452515 (stock #TCR8238)
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Raised relief carving of reishi mushrooms growing up around garden stones decorates this heavy vase covered in Ame-yu “Candy Glaze” by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 34 cm tall and in excellent condition. A strikingly similar design by the 4th generation Rokubei in more earthy Irabo glaze is published in the tome: Kiyomizu Rokuebei Rekidai Ten (2004, page 84 figure IV-3) and shows the continuity of tradition which paralleled the advancements and innovations made through the multi-generations of the Rokubei dynasties.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1452501 (stock #TCR8237)
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This is a very interesting look at the liberal advancement of the Rokubei Kiln in the 19th century. A wide chawan tea bowl hand formed by Shunko (Haruka) decorated with a blossoming plum by Suzuki Shonen enclosed in a custom wooden box titled Umenoga chawan (tea bowl with plum). It bears the impressed seal Shunko inside the foot-ring. Stylistically these are very much in keeping with the works of Otagaki Rengetsu, many of which were also fired at the Rokubei Kiln under the watch of the fourth generation. It is likely that the women at the kiln would have gotten along well with each other, and possibly even worked side by side. That said I have found no records of the names of the female members of the Rokubei household. The bowl is 16 cm (6-1/4 inches) diameter. There are some stress cracks from the rim about the plum branch, either a very tight repair or simply cracked but not broken. The box inscription reads:
Handmade by Mother (unreadable) Female Shunko (alternate reading Haruka)
Decorated by the Old Friend Shonen
Fired by Father 4th Generation Shorin (Shorin was an alternate name used by Rokubei IV)
Annotated by the 5th Generation Rokubei followed by two stamps
Kiyomizu Rokubei IV (1848-1920) was born the first son of Rokubei III and headed the family kiln from 1883-1913.He studied painting in the Shijo manner under Shiiokawa Bunrin and had a brotherly relationship with his fellow student Kono Bairei (under whom his own son would study painting). He sought to revitalize the pottery tradition of Kyoto, bringing in new techniques and styles and together with artists like Asai Chu and Nakazawa Iwata took part in the Entoen group and with Kamizaka Sekka the Keitobi-kai. He also held a strong relationship with literati artists such as Tomioka Tessai and together with these artists produced many joint works. He fell ill in 1902, finally handing the reins over to the 5th generation in 1913.
Suzuki Shonen (1849-1918) studied under his father Suzuki Hyakunen and served as a professor at the Kyoto Municipal School of Painting. Born in Kyoto, he lived through the tumultuous early years of change in the Meiji era, when Japan was opened to outside influence for the first time in 3 centuries. Reflecting the times, he established his own unique style of painting which blended aspects of Nanga and the Shijo School, with influences from Otsu-e and Western Perspective. Much lauded in his lifetime, he was awarded a silver medal at the Paris World Exhibition in 1900. He is well known as the teacher of Uemura Shoen, one of the most important artists of the era. Works by this artist are held in the collection of the Victoria Albert Museum, British Museum, Ashmolean, Kyoto Municipal Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Seattle Art Museum among many many other important private and public collections.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1452486 (stock #L039)
The Kura
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The painting of an oxcart has a water stain on one side. It can be cleaned if desired, at cost. Imagery of the twelve months by Hayashi Bunto mounted as 12 individual scrolls housed three a piece in four signed wooden boxes all enclosed like drawers in one larger wooden box. Pigment and ink on paper in a silk border with bone rollers. They are 42 x 214 cm each (16-1/2 inches x 7 feet) and overall, in excellent condition.
Hayashi Bunto (1882-1966) studied painting under Yamamoto Shunkyo, and became a preeminent Shijo school artist of the early 20th Century. Disillusioned with the juried exhibitions, along with Kikuchi Keigetsu and Iguchi Kashu, he was instrumental in the founding of the Nihon Jiyu Gakkai. He is held in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto, The Morikami museum as well as many private collections.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1452432 (stock #ALR8234)
The Kura
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An incredible Flambe glazed vase by Kiyomizu Rokubei V on a black-wood stand enclosed in a massive red lacquered storage box heavily inscribed and signed by the artist. I rarely use the term, but this is Museum Quality, or perhaps I should more rightly say this unprecedented piece should be in a Museum! It is 55 cm tall (22 inches), 41 cm (16 inches) diameter. There is a firing flaw in one side (see close-up pictures). Less a box than a cabinet, inside the door is a long inscription which describes the conditions and methods of production of the vase dated 1918.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1452354 (stock #TCR8236)
The Kura
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A complex pastoral landscape circumnavigates this large basin by Kiyomizu Rokubei III enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The basin is slightly out of round, 29.5 x 31 x 13 cm (11-1/2 x 12 x 5 inches). There is a firing flaw at the rim, but no later damage.
Rokubei III (Koto Kuritaro, 1820-1883) was born in Kyoto second son of Rokubei II. His landscape painting was strongly influenced by the Nanga artist Oda Kaisen, from whom he learned decorating techniques. He took over the family kiln even younger than his own father at the age of 18 in 1838. It was Rokubei III who would acquire a large climbing kiln, from which subsequent generations would fire, and placing the Rokubei lineage at the center of the nations Ceramic Art Scene. This was the beginning of the Bakumatsu era, the fall of the Edo Shogunate, and Kyoto would play centre stage in this tumultuous era. Vagabonds, Rebels, Reformers and Loyalists made mayhem in the streets and battles raged across the city while foreign powers leveraged unfair treaties against the reluctant Shogun. Many advanced techniques were imported to Japan through Rangaku (Dutch studies) at the open port of Nagasaki and then from a growing number of locations after the arrival of Commodore Perry in 1853. In 1868 the Edo government fell, and the capital was moved to Tokyo. Rokubei III was aware of the advantages of modernism, while maintaining the traditions of the former generations. He went to Yokohama with Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan in 1868. However, he was persuaded to remain in Kyoto (along with a branch of the Makuzu family) to modernize the Kyoto ceramic industry, and although he did create works in the modern style and to suit Western taste, (he was one of the artists commissioned to create pottery for the 1879 visit of former US president Ulysses S. Grant) he maintained a fairly conservative oeuvre oriented toward the Japanese aesthetic. He excelled in porcelain wares, and was much lauded in his lifetime being awarded at a multitude of domestic exhibitions as well as internationally in Paris, Sydney and Amsterdam. Like his forebearers, he was very much a part of the Kyoto scene at the time, and many works created by Rokubei III were decorated by top painters of the era. Important works by poet/artist/nun Otagaki Rengetsu were created in the studio of Rokubei III. Work by Rokubei III is held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of art New York, the Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and Ashmolean among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1452289 (stock #TCR8235)
The Kura
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A small Nodate-chawan tea bowl decorated outside with a long poem dated early summer 1870, and decorated inside with a symbol of longevity, an ancient pine enclosed in the original signed wooden box with matching date. The opening characters of the verse Furotei Dojin (House of the immortal sage)… I am not a scholar, and cannot read all of the poem, but it appears to lament the drastic changes and questions upon whom to rely upon. It ends Early Summer, Kanoe-Year (in the ten year cycle of 1850 1860, 1870 or 1880) Signed Shoun (a poetic named used by Rokubei III) followed by his stamp. The bowl is 11 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
A touch of historical background for the early summer of 1870…Battles raged across Japan in 1868, with the restoration of the Meiji emperor and fall of the Tokugawa Shogun made official on October 23rd. Subsequently over the following year the emperor vacated the Kyoto palace, moving to Tokyo, where the new capitol was declared. The Samurai army escaped to Hokkaido, where they established a new country called Ezo, but were overrun and defeated by the summer of 1869. In October of the same year Omuro Masajiro, the samurai born father of the Modern Japanese Army, and his associates were assassinated in Kyoto (He died later of his wounds). Shortly thereafter the Feudal armies of the Daimyo warlords were abolished, and Samurai privileges were rescinded. The fledgling new government was attempting to remake the nation in a modern image after 250 years of feudalism. Still there was no national currency or national newspaper and times were very insecure for the average citizen.
Rokubei III (Koto Kuritaro, 1820-1883) was born in Kyoto second son of Rokubei II. He took over the family kiln even younger than his own father at the age of 18 in 1838. This was the beginning of the Bakumatsu era, the fall of the Edo Shogunate, and Kyoto would play centre stage in this tumultuous era. Vagabonds, Rebels, Reformers and Loyalists made mayhem in the streets and battles raged across the city while foreign powers leveraged unfair treaties against the reluctant Shogun. Many advanced techniques were imported to Japan through Rangaku (Dutch studies) at the open port of Nagasaki and then from a growing number of locations after the arrival of Commodore Perry in 1853. In 1868 the Edo government fell, and the capital was moved to Tokyo. Rokubei III was aware of the advantages of modernism, while maintaining the traditions of the former generations. He went to Yokohama with Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan in 1868. However, he was persuaded to remain in Kyoto (along with a branch of the Makuzu family) to modernize the Kyoto ceramic industry, and although he did create works in the modern style and to suit Western taste, (he was one of the artists commissioned to create pottery for the 1879 visit of former US president Ulysses S. Grant) he maintained a fairly conservative oeuvre oriented toward the Japanese aesthetic. He excelled in porcelain wares, and was much lauded in his lifetime being awarded at a multitude of domestic exhibitions as well as internationally in Paris, Sydney and Amsterdam. Like his forebearers, he was very much a part of the Kyoto scene at the time, and many works created by Rokubei III were decorated by top painters of the era. Important works by poet/artist/nun Otagaki Rengetsu were created in the studio of Rokubei III. Work by Rokubei III is held in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of art New York, the Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and Ashmolean among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1452277 (stock #AOR8233)
The Kura
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An important large album by Tanaka Hakuin called an Impu, recording a great many of the various seals the artist used throughout his career. The first and last two pages are blank, throughout the rest of the book are various seals impressed onto the left leaf opposite 11 landscape paintings on the right. The booklet is 7 x 9-1/4 inches and is in overall fine condition. Also a small album with 26 leaves of stamps bound with padded silk in a small cover. It is 2-1/2 x 3-1/2 inches. There are some stains along the edges.
Tanaka Hakuin (birth name Nakagawa Keizaburo, 1866-1934) was born in Suruga, Shizuoka prefecture in the last years of the Edo period and became a student of Tanomura Chokunyu in Kyoto, the cultural heartland of Japan, at the age of 17. This was a tumultuous period as Western ideas and Technology were flooding into Japan. He was the top pupil of Chokunyu, working in the style of both Chikuden and his mentor. At this time he used the name Tanomura Hakuin. In 1900 he married and moved to Hofu city in Yamaguchi prefecture taking his wifes family name Tanaka as his surname, and thereafter was known as Tanaka Hakuin. He established a school for painting where he worked for his remaining years. Work by him is held in the Mori Art Museum and Honolulu Museum of Art among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1452198 (stock #TCR8227)
The Kura
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A delicate white flower blossoms on the pink surface of this exquisite vessel by Kiyomizu Rokubei V which comes wrapped in the original stamped cloth sack and enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taireiji Kabin. The vase is 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Taireiji was the most important development by this innovative artist, and pieces are exceedingly rare.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1452129 (stock #TCR8231)
The Kura
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Brilliant overglazed enamels decorate this two piece court cap shaped Censer by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Iro-e Kanmuri Koro. The base is a small pottery basin in which the burning incense cone would be placed, the courtly cap placed over it and the smoke allowed to drift out through the pierced designs. It is 17 cm (6-3/4) tall 16.5 x 11 cm (6-1/2 x 4-1/2 inches) and in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1452094 (stock #TCR8229)
The Kura
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A boxed set of six Art-nouveau influenced porcelain cups by Kiyomizu Rokubei IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mugishu-nomi (Beer Cup) and dated to the Meiji period. The trumpeting forms are 8.3 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter, 12.2 cm (4-3/4 inches) tall and all are in excellent condition. The full inscription inside the box reads 9th month of Meiji ? 9, Received from the honorable Sugiura; The Fujioka collection. This is a very interesting set showing the advanced designs which were produced by Rokubei along with his more sedate traditional Japanese oriented works. And, to boot, specifically made for beer, not sake, shochu or spirits.
Kiyomizu Rokubei IV (1848-1920) was born the first son of Rokubei III and headed the family kiln from 1883-1913.He studied painting in the Shijo manner under Shiiokawa Bunrin and had a brotherly relationship with his fellow student Kono Bairei (under whom his own son would study painting). He sought to revitalize the pottery tradition of Kyoto, bringing in new techniques and styles and together with artists like Asai Chu and Nakazawa Iwata took part in the Entoen group and with Kamizaka Sekka the Keitobi-kai. He also held a strong relationship with literati artists such as Tomioka Tessai and together with these artists produced many joint works. He fell ill in 1902, finally handing the reins over to the 5th generation in 1913.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1452017 (stock #TCR8230)
The Kura
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Iris seem to take flight like the trailing tails of fireworks on this set of Tokkuri by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. White porcelain sides give way to the concave base in raw clay with nunome cloth pattern. Each is 12 cm tall (5 inches) tall in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1452016 (stock #TCR8225)
The Kura
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A set of 10 bowls with lids by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seika Tsubaki Futamono wan (Blue and White Glazed Covered Bowls with Camellia). Each is roughly 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter, 7.5 cm (3 inches) tall and all are in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1451993 (stock #TCR8228)
The Kura
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An exquisite koro by Kiyomizu Rokube V with solid silver lid enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled: Censer engraved with flowering Paulownia. This style is called Taireiji, developed by and unique to the fifth generation Rokubei. The most famous work in this style is undoubtedly a vase decorated with parrots in a tree held in the collection of the Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art. This piece is more subtle, the imagery soft and delicate, breathtaking in person. The paulownia tree glazed in white spreads its branches out around the body of the urn, flowers rising up from the broad leaves. The rising flower of the paulownia is a symbol if the imperial family. The background, very subtle, it is entirely engraved with sasa bamboo leaves the same color as the body. This double layer of carving is very rare. The solid silver lid is signed by the silversmith, and pierced with Phoenix, another symbol of the Japanese Imperial Family. It comes enclosed in a double wood protective box (Ni-ju Bako). A masterpiece by this most important figure.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1451926 (stock #TCR8223)
The Kura
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A stunning large bowl decorated with overlapping palm leaves by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 cm (9-1/2 inches) diameter, 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It certainly expresses the design skil and painting abilities of this important artist.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1451860 (stock #TCR8222)
The Kura
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Famous scenes in Kyoto decorated this set of five unique plates by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Each is 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1950 item #1451844 (stock #TCR8224)
The Kura
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The character for good fortune is emblazoned on the side of this Tokkuri set by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Sometsuke Tokkuri. White porcelain sides give way to the concave base in raw clay with nunome cloth pattern. Each is 12 cm tall (5 inches) tall in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.