The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489685
The Kura
$600.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful set of ten small shallow dishes, each uniquely decorated with a poem and image from the Edo period Sasashima Kiln of central Nagoya. The box, titled Sasashima Yaki Teshio Jumai (10 Sasashima Salt Dishes) is dated inside to the Tenpo era, (1830-1844). Each dish is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. Salt dishes were small plates used to hold salt, pickles or other condiments in a traditional Japanese meal. Finding a complete set like this in good condition is exceedingly rare.
The kiln producing Sasashima ware was opened by Makibokusai in the Bunka era in central Nagoya. Sasashima ware is characterized by its bright colors, and it is said that Makibokusai was also good at carving. The kiln, which continued for three generations after Makibokusai, is said to have disappeared around 1923 (Taisho 12) due to the expansion work of Nagoya Station.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1489650
The Kura
$965.00
An exquisitely carved wooden tray in the shape of a Bushukan (Buddhas Hand Fruit) made for presentation of Sencha Tea dating from the early 20th century signed on back Koseki. Upon one curling leaf rests a snail opposite a frog staring off into the distance as in a Zen state. The tray is 53.5 x 30 cm (21 x 12 inches) and is in excellent condition. Beneath is equally beautifully carved, with the signature Koseki engraved into the stem of the cluster.
The importance of the Sencha tea aesthetic from the late Edo through the early Showa periods cannot be overlooked, and has been studied in depth in the book Tea of the Sages, the Art of Sencha by Patricia Jane Graham.
Bushukan, also known as Buddha's hand fruit, is a unique citrus fruit that holds significant cultural and symbolic importance in various Asian cultures, particularly in China and Japan. Buddha's hand fruit is often associated with good fortune, happiness, and longevity. In Buddhist culture, the fruit is sometimes offered in temples or used as a religious offering. Its association with Buddha's hand signifies spiritual purity and enlightenment. The fruit's visually striking appearance makes it popular for decorative purposes, especially during festivals and celebrations. It's often displayed in homes as a symbol of prosperity and good luck.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1489649
The Kura
$1,200.00
An E-karatsu Yobitsugi bowl made of various shards attached with wide bands of gold to a discarded base: the pieces dating from the Momoyama to early Edo periods. It is 22 x 20 x 6 cm 8-1/2 x 8 x 2-1/4 inches) and comes enclosed in a modern kiri-wood collectors box titled E-Karatsu Hachi.
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1700 item #1489585
The Kura
$4,500.00
A classic Nanban style Japanese lacquer tray decorated with mother of pearl inlay featuring four panels of birds among floral patterns separated by bands and frets dating from the 17th century later Momoyama to early Edo era. It is 43 × 28.5 x 2cm (17 x 11 x 1 inches). It has been fully restored, with repairs to the original lacquer and inlay, and the underside has been re-lacquered. It comes in a custom fitted Chinese style cloth bound box lined with red silk.
According to the Met: The Portuguese and Spanish who visited Japan during the Momoyama period were fascinated by the beauty and exotic appearance of luxurious gold-decorated lacquerwares associated with the taste of warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537–1598). As a result, lacquers commissioned for the European market typically adopted this flamboyant style (Kōdaiji maki-e). Such pieces—among the earliest trade goods exported from Japan—are known collectively as “Nanban,” or “Southern Barbarian,” the Japanese appellation for foreigners who arrived “from the south.” Highly prized by the great families of Europe as luxurious exotica, they helped to define a “Japan aesthetic” for the Continent for more than three centuries. The decorative patterns depict Japanese subjects, among others, including maple, mandarin orange, and cherry trees, camellia flowers, wisteria branches, and birds. The decorative bands of the borders are embellished with geometric designs. One of the characteristic features of the Nanban lacquers is the rich application of mother-of-pearl inlays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489472
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A small vase sculpted in the shape of a cluster of roses covered in cockscomb red by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase shows the influence of Art-Nouveau, and Rokubei was one of the leading proponents of blending Western and Eastern ideals in clay art. The vase is 6.5cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 18.5cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in the original artist stamped cloth complete with the original black wood stand.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489438
The Kura
$1,200.00
A classic vessel reflecting the grace of Song-Yuan period aesthetics by master of the genre Suwa Sozan II (Torako) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 25 cm (10 inches) tall and in excellent condition. A prime example of this early female Japanese potters work.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489417
The Kura
$3,800.00
A pair of vases in the shape of old wooden well buckets (tsurube) in white glaze upon which is scrawled in beautiful grass scrip a poem by Otagaki Rengetsu. The poem reads: Yamazato wa
matsu no koe nomi
kiki nare te
kaze fuka nu hi wa
sabishikari keri
Which translates as:
Living deep in the mountains
I’ve grown fond
of the soughing pines
On days when the wind is still
how lonely it is
Each is roughly 15 cm (just under 6 inches) square 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall and both are in excellent condition. ).
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1489359
The Kura
sold, thank you
A very rare Mashiko platter by Living National Treasure Hamada Shoji decorated with a poem cradled in an offset ring forming the mika-tsuki or third day moon by poet Shimizu Hian. The poem reads: Akaki Mi no Omoto no Hotori Dainaru Maruki kono yo no ishi okitari, and is signed by the 76 year old man Hian meaning it was made either in 1958 or 59 (depending upon whether Hian was going by the Western or Japanese manner of counting age). It is 35.5 cm (14 inches) diameter and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a wooden box signed by Hamada’s son.
Hamada Shoji (1894-1978) was born in Tokyo, and enrolled in the Tokyo Technical University at the age of 19. In 1918 he met the important British potter Bernard Leach, and the history of ceramic arts was forever changed. One of the most influential and sought after of all Japanese Ceramic artists. He was a significant influence on studio pottery of the twentieth century, and a driving force of the mingei folk-art movement. In 1955 he was designated a "Living National Treasure". There is no shortage of reading material for those who would like to learn more about this potter.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489358
The Kura
$600.00
3 robed figures appear decidedly relaxed on the edge of a rock-strewn river lost in dark mountains. Above a poem reads:
Furusato ha Arukiteyukeru Tokoro ni-te, Yama ari, Mizu ari, kataru yuujin ari (Walking through my home(town) I find mountains, water and friends for conversation).
Ink on paper bordered in patterned silk with bone rollers. It is 59 x 129 cm (23 x 51 inches) and is in overall fine condition, with some toning due to age. Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1489357
The Kura
$450.00
A rustic platter in dark olive by Uno Sango decorated in red with a poem by Shimizu Hian extolling the beauty of a rainbow enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 27 cm (just less than 11 inches) square and in excellent condition. Enclosed is an exhibition card dated 1965.
Amanohara Hayase no Gotoku Michigirite Nagareru Kumo ni Niji Wo Kaketari
Flowing Rapids of Heavenly clouds tear open, A rainbow spans the gap.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.
Uno Sango (1902-1988) was born the fourth son of Kyoto potter Uno Ninmatsu.. After being active in the Imperial Art Exhibitions and the Nikakai, he was an active participant in the Japan Craft Association. He presided over the Shikokai, and later served as judge, director, and the manager of the Kinki branch of the Japan Kogei Association. He was awarded the Kyoto Order of Cultural Merit for his promotion of the arts. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art Tokyo, National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto as well as the Shiga Prefectural Ceramic Art Museum (Togei no Mori) among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489304 (stock #Z003)
The Kura
$500.00
A poem plays randomly about the great trunk of an ancient pine on rough mulberry paper on this painting by artist and poet Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Ink on paper in a silk border with ceramic rollers. It is 40.5 x 158 (16 x 62-1/4 inches) and is in excellent condition. The poem reads:
On the 6th day of the 6th month in my 71st year, I still my heart preparing a cup of tea, expressing words of joy in this long life, my beard flows white… Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489298 (stock #L122)
The Kura
$650.00
Water streams between the verdant hills on this lurid landscape by 20th century artist Shimizu Hian. Ink on paper completely remounted in silk with black lacquer rollers. The poem reads: Hana chirite Arui ha, Samuki hi mo arinu, Haru no Yukue no shizuka nari keru (Early flowers have fallen and the cold lingers, nonetheless Spring quietly approaches). It is 63 x 129 cm (25 x 51 inches) and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 1980 item #1489297
The Kura
sold, thank you
A black glazed bowl decorated with the Zen phrase Buji by Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter, 8 cm (just more than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It is signed on the side Hian followed by his age at 91 years old. Buji is a Japanese Zen Buddhist concept that can be translated as "nothing eventful" or "nothing lacking." It is often used to express a state of tranquility, contentment, or a sense of completeness. In the context of Zen philosophy, "Buji" suggests a state of being where one is free from desires, attachments, and the sense of lacking something. The idea behind "Buji" is rooted in mindfulness, meditation, and living in the present moment. It encourages individuals to let go of unnecessary worries, desires, and preoccupations, allowing them to fully embrace and appreciate the current moment without a sense of deficiency. In Zen practice, attaining a state of "Buji" is often associated with a deep understanding of the impermanence of life and the futility of clinging to material possessions or fleeting experiences. It promotes a more profound sense of inner peace and contentment by letting go of the constant pursuit of external validations and desires. While "Buji" is a term with specific relevance in the context of Zen Buddhism, its underlying message of finding contentment and peace in the present moment has broader applications and can be appreciated in various aspects of life.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1980 item #1489294
The Kura
sold, thank you
A small ceramic box for carrying incense in the shape of a gingko leaf decorated with the single character Hana (flower) by Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8 x 6 x 3 cm (roughly 3 x 2-1/4 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1489293
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fine tea bowl in Gohon Hagi glaze decorated with the characters Haku-un (White Cloud) by Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter8 cm (just more than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489169
The Kura
$950.00
Dragons charge the sides of this large water urn covered in crackled pale glaze emblazoned with a panel which specifies: Water for the 11 Faced Kannon (Quanyin). Inside is lined with iron glaze. Outside key frets surround the rim leading to a nearly flat shoulder upon which blossom five petaled plum flowers. Below this the dragons vie in the tempest, with the base drawing precipitously covered in Shipppo designs (7 treasures). It is 38 cm (15 inches) tall, 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) diameter. There are glaze losses to the rim, and a repair to a firing crack inside the rim (see close-up photos), otherwise is in excellent condition dating from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1489085
The Kura
$5,500.00
Startled to enlightenment, this is a large Edo period figure of a Rakan (Sanskrit: Arhat), a Buddhist saint kozutsucarved in the Yosegi-zaiku method of joined blocks of wood. Originally covered in polychrome colors, much has grayed and flaked away with time, a fitting aspect of the image. He has glass eyes which seem to burn violently with realization. The image is 43 x 36 x 51 cm (17 x 14 x 20 inches) and is in solid condition. The head is removable, slotted into the body at the collar. For additional images please inquire. In Buddhist lore the Rakan is one who has broken the chain of re-birth and overcome the three poisons of desire, hatred and ignorance. It is a popular theme in both Chinese and Japanese art. According to the Met: Rakan are ascetics who guard and proclaim Buddhist law on earth in the period between the death of Shakyamuni, the historical Buddha, and the coming of Maitreya, the Buddha of the Future. They have inspired some of the freest and most lively depictions of the human figure in Japanese art. Age and the struggle for salvation have left their mark, but in the figures’ gnarled faces and bodies is a strong expression of the uniqueness of each individual. Because Rakan achieved enlightenment through rigorous individual effort and meditation, they appealed to practitioners of Zen Buddhism and became a popular icon in medieval Japan. They are conventionally portrayed in groups of sixteen…
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1489008
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of three Chin puppies by Miyagwa (Makuzu) Kozan II published in the book Miyagawa Kozan and the World of Makuzu Ware (Yokohama Museum of Art, 2001) page 144, figure 174. They are roughly 5 x 10 cm (2 x 4 inches) and in excellent condition. They come enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1488705
The Kura
$2,500.00
A protective deity is carved into this Piece of a pillar from Himeji Castle dating from the Meiji period restoration of the Tenshukaku (main tower). It is branded with the Yaki-in which reads Himeji Jo Ko-zai-in (Brand of the old wood from Himeji Castle). It has long been a method of raising funds in Japan to offer replaced pieces of a historical building to those who donate to the restoration. These pieces are commonly branded with a special seal, called a yaki-in, which is heated and burnt into the surface, stating from which famous building the Ko-zai or old material, comes from. This large piece also has on another side written “Keicho 5 (1602) Ikeda Terumasa Chikujo (Castle made by Ikeda Terumasa) Kokuho Himeji Jo Tenshukaku Kozai (Old material from the Main Tower of National Treasure Himeji Castle) Yonkai Ko-neta (4th Floor small joist). It is 89 cm (35 inches) tall, 12 x 13 cm (roughly 5 inches) square.
Himeji Castle dates to 1333 when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346 and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For almost 700 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters including the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake. Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures.
In 1873 (Meiji 6), many of Japan's castles were destroyed due to the Castle Abolition Ordinance as they were seen as symbols of the former government (Shogun) and were no longer necessary for defense, but around 1877 (Meiji 10), when the major changes at the beginning of the Meiji period had come to an end, there was born a movement to preserve the countries castles. At the request of Colonel Shigeto Nakamura, who oversaw construction and repairs in the Army, Himeji Castle was also preserved with national funds, including its large and small castle towers and turrets, along with Nagoya Castle (Unfortunately, Nagoya Castle was later burnt down in the war). following, temporary repairs were carried out, but due to lack of funding, full-scale renovation was postponed until 1910. At this time the large castle tower was repaired along with the remaining small castle towers (east small castle tower, west small castle tower, inui small castle tower) in the first phase of construction.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1488700 (stock #OC017)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A handle surmounts the peak of this beautifully rendered vase by Myagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Sometsuke Te-oke-gata Kabin (Celadon Handled Bucket Shaped Vase with Blue and White Design). It is 16 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32.5 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1488614
The Kura
$1,700.00
Sale Pending
An unusual Edo period Oribe serving bowl, the color filled crackled glaze decorated with scrolling lines in iron and splashes of copper green. Both inside and out hash mars denote a bamboo fence with blossoms in the fore. A handle and raised architectural elements around the rim and rising to the mouth echo some western influence, possibly indicating original Christian use. It comes resting on a silk pillow in a age-blackened wooden box titled Oribe Katakuchi. The piece measure 24.5 x 13.5 x 10 cm (10 x 5-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
On a little historical note, a toned paper label on one side denotes the piece was once placed under hold by the Himeji Courthouse as part of a property with a lean against it, indicating the piece was considered to be of significant value even a century ago.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1488519
The Kura
$1,700.00
Plums blossom red on the dark surface of this traditionally shaped Mizusashi bearing the rare Ubagamochi Stamp impressed into the clay of the base. It is 18 cm diameter, 15 cm tall, and comes in an old custom made collectors kiri-wood box labeled Ubagamochi Mimitsuki Mizusashi. It retains the original ceramic lid, as well as two lacquered lids, one a tsukuibuta lid in austere black, the other redish brown outside, gold within, featuring a raised image of a dragon flying through billowing clouds circling mount Fuji.
Ubagamochi is a rice cake popular in Kusatsu in Omi Province (modern Kusatsu City, Shiga Prefecture) and Ubagamochiyaki is a pottery made there. Legend has it that the owner of the Ubagamochi Chaya in this area founded a kiln in the mid 18th century.. originally making plates upon which to serve the famous Ubagamochi cakes, it expanded to tea ware purportedly under the 8th head of the family Segawa Kuniyoshi, who was a dedicated tea practitioner and close with the lords of Omi and Zeze Castle (which had its own pottery). This lasted through the 10th head of the family Kanazawa Kocho, who was also a fervent follower of tea. Unique Carved Hand Wooden Sculpture by Makino Koen Yay or Nay, stop or go, all good or hang on a second… .an intriguing wooden sculpture by Makino Koen of Niigata prefecture, a two sided hand carved from Japanese hardwood, one side gesturing with all fingers extended, the other joining the thumb and forefinger in an OK sign. It is 37 x 23 x 38 cm and in excellent condition, signed beneath.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488518
The Kura
$1,200.00
A beautifully carved tray of overlapping leaves interspersed with clustered grapes by Ichikawa Shudo signed on back in a circular cartouche. In one corner an odd round tail leads us to a squirrel head popping through the leaves, as if one were looking up through the vines toward the sky. It is 46 x 35 x 3 cm (roughly 18 x 14 x 1 inches) and is in overall fine condition, There is a slight warp to the bottom of the tray, but it is still bery usable and there is no damage to the carving. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488414
The Kura
$700.00
A stunning unadorned work of wood art covered in a thin layer of wiped on lacquer (Fuki Urushi) dating from the early 20th century. The artist puts nothing but his craft into the mottled grain of the tray, a true mark of wood mastery and humility. It is 42 x 31.5 x 3 cm (roughly 16 x 12-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. This is in the style of Ichikawa Shudo, and comes from a collection of several works by him.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1488404
The Kura
$1,950.00
Sale Pending
Two Jubako stacking porcelain boxes enclosed in their unique wooden boxes which are both enclosed together in an additional outer wooden box for protection. According to the lid, the designs were by Kinoshita Itsuun and Uragami Gyokudo, and the pieces were made by Kawamoto Hansuke. Hansuke is considered the progenitor of porcelain production in Seto, and it was through an act of industrial espionage that he was able to bring the techniques, until then the secrets of the Kyushu potteries, to Seto. It is believed the 3rd generation Hansuke went to Kyushu, purportedly to help with the establishment of the Kameyama Kiln, and stole the secrets of porcelain production. Each set of boxes is roughly 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) square, 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and enclosed in respective age-darkened wooden boxes. The landscape dominated pieces are in excellent condition, the boxes with floral designs have several small chips and one gold repair. The box for the landscape piece is titled Ju-bachi Hakurendo and has inside two long verses stating the paintings was performed by Gyokudo. The box for the second piece is signed inside Shintoen Hansuke-zo, the name used by the 4th generation Hansuke.
During the Horeki era (1751-1764), the first generation Kawamoto Hansuke worked with Kawamoto Jihei to build both the Asahi and Yuhi kilns, and each subsequent generation inherited the name Hansuke. The third generation switched to Sometsuke-yaki in 1804. His son, the fourth generation, took over the family business in 1822. He created a variety of Shozui-style dyed patterns and was a naturally talented artist, inheriting his father's legacy, and was always passionate about improving porcelain. 'In the Tenpo era, he finally invented the idea of pulverizing Gyaman stone and blending it with the original clay creating a lustrous, tranparent porcelain. During the Tenpo era (1830-1844), he was ranked as the Bishu family's pottery master. He is remembered as a person who made a significant contribution to the history of Seto's ceramic industry for his research into the use of silica stone as a glaze on porcelain to increase transparency and improve the color of Gosu, and for his efforts to improve quality.In 1858 (Ansei 5), he adopted Kawamoto Masukichi as his eldest daughter's son-in-law and passed the family business to him as the fifth generation.
Kameyama ware was made in Nagasaki during the late Edo period. The high-quality white porcelain is famous for its literati-style Gosu paintings reminiscent of imported Chinese models, but many designs evoke an exotic atmosphere unique to Nagasaki. A characteristic of Gosu is that it is darker overall than Imari. Under the Nagasaki Magistrate, the techniques of potters in each domain were handed down from generation to generation, producing highly skilled porcelain such as Mikawachi ware from the Hirado domain, Hasami ware from the Omura domain, and Arita ware from the Saga domain. In 1807, a kiln was opened in Kakineyama, Irabayashi, Nagasaki by 4 potters with funds by a loan from the Nagasaki Magistrate's Office, the kiln named Kameyama. The clay was taken from Amakusa, Ajiro as well as imported clay from Suzhou in China. Prominent literary figures such as Tanomura Chikuden, Kinoshita Itsuun, Somon Tetsuo, and Miura Gomon, designed elegant literati paintings for the pottery decoration. By 1819, it was run solely by Jingohei Ogami, and during the Kansei and Tenpo years it reached its peak, gaining reputation for its high quality. In 1839, Jingohei Ogami passed away at the age of 65, and the second generation, Jingohei, took over the kiln, which remained in operation until 1865. Because the pottery was produced over a short period of about 50 years, and there are few passed down items, it is called a phantom pottery, and particularly well-crafted pieces are prized by collectors.
Kinoshita Itsuun (1800 - 1866) was a nanga during the latter part of the Edo period. born as the third son of Kinoshite Katsushige in Nagasaki. At the age of 17 he inherited the role of "Otona," or village head, which had been assumed by the Kinoshita family for generations, but transferred the role to his elder brother in 1829. Working as a medical doctor, which had been his initial interest, he was committed to proliferation of vaccination learned from a Dutch medical doctor. Itsuun first learned Nanga painting from Ishizaki Yushi, as well as directly under several Chinese artists visiting Nagasaki. He ardently studied the techniques of various painting schools including Unkoku, the Kano School, Yamato-e and the Maruyama Shijo School as well as Western oil painting and incorporated them into his own technique. He tavelled in literati circles with the likes of Rai Sanyo, Tanomura Chikuden, Somon Tetsuo and Hirose Tanso. He also excelled in other fields such as calligraphy, tenkoku (seal-engra
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488357
The Kura
$350.00
The basho leaf begins to split and fold over upon itself, a symbol of the transient nature of life appropriate to the confines of the tea room. It is 39.5 cm long and in excellent, original condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488356
The Kura
sold, thank you
A tiny tree frog rests safely on the edge of the broad leaf of a Basho tree, the leaf just beginning to curl in upon itself, a sign of the delicate transience of life. It is 50 cm long and in overall excellent condition signed beneath by the artist.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488233
The Kura
$395.00
A carved wooden bowl wrapped in floral motifs dating from the early 20th century signed beneath by the carver. The dimensional imagery depicts lotus leaves, lotus root and clusters of Biwa (loquat) fruit. It is 21 x 20 x 5 cm (roughly 8 inches diameter, 2 inches tall) and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1488230
The Kura
$2,750.00
Phoenix soar among golden clouds on this amazing Lacquer box made for holding a Tsuzumi drum by Miura Meiho (1900-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Houn Maki-e Tuzumi Bako. It is bound with silk chord which is held to the box with solid silver hardware. Inside it is lined with brocade. The box is 30.5 x 24 x 24.5 cm (12 x 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches) an is in perfect condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1800 item #1487897
The Kura
$2,200.00
Sale Pending
A set of 5 rare Dutch glass cups imported to Japan in the Edo period and formerly owned by the Confucian scholar Nakai Riken (1732-1817). They are enclosed in a custom made double sided wooden box with drop in doors titled on the side Yoi-O-Gozui (Five fortuitous ways to be drunken) with a long verse carved into each door. Of course, the meaning of the title goes much deeper, and the Gozui is also a Confucian concept. The emperor of China distributed five jade treasures to the five feudal lords, and they were named. The scholar has named each of the cups after one of these jade objects, Ko, Yu, Haku, Shi and Dan. The Osaka University Professor Ueda Minoru researched Riken, and mentions the treasured set of five glass cups, the smallest with a golden rim, in his research of the scholars life and belongings, claiming them to be one of his most treasured items. The largest cup is 15 cm tall, the smallest 7.5 cm. There are some chips and fractures in the corners of the seven-sided foot of the smallest cup, otherwise all is in overall excellent condition.
Nakai Riken (1732-1817) was a Confucian scholar of the later Edo period. He studied Neo-Confucianism under Goi Ranshu, and together with his older brother Nakai Chikuzan, supported Kaitokudo, a school of learning in Osaka, leaving behind the greatest academic achievements of the Kaitokudo school. the rational and modern academic style that is characteristic of Kaitokudo literati was established mainly by Riken. As a scholar he commented on the classics and wrote books such as " Nanakyo Kadai," and "Shichikyo Kadai Ryaku." These were compiled into a total of thirty-three volumesara. He was well versed not only in economics but also in natural sciences such as astronomy. Goryu Asada, who had studied Western astronomy in earnest, stayed with. He wrote an overview of the ming period book "Tenkyo Arumon," by Yushiroku, and created a celestial map. In addition to astronomy, he also left a natural history map "Sakura Cho", an anatomical chart "Etsuryofutsu", and a microscope observation record "Microscopic Record". In addition, he wrote "Kashokoku Monogatari" (The Tale of Kashokoku), in which the protagonist was the king of a fictitious ideal nation, 'Kashokoku,' and discussed how the nation should be governed. A prolific writer, he left a vast body of contextual research for subsequent generations.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487857
The Kura
$3,500.00
A radical Bizen Mizusashi with two lacquered wooden lids enclosed in a black lacquered wooden box with gold lacquer writing titled Samidare which is in turn enclosed in a kiri-wood storage box by the same title compartmentalized to allow the lids to be stored safely. Samidare is a poetic reading for Rain of the Fifth Month (June in the traditional calendar). It has a seal of overlapping rings impressed into the earth of the base, and dates from the Edo period. The lids are for differing events, one black lacquered, the other covered with gorgeous gold and silver maki-e clouds with a soaring nightingale in gold, inside the ghost of a crescent moon. The Vessel itself is crusted with ash and dribbles of ocher with kutsuki on the side where something adhered to it in the firing. Inside the trials of the artist fingers are clearly visible. The receptacle is 23 x 20 x 15 cm (9 x 8 x 6 inches) ad is in overall excellent original condition. A very impressive presentation. Inside the Kiri box is written that the piece was viewed by The honorable Mr. Inoue upon his visit in Meiji 45 (1912). Inside the black lacquered lid is a paper tablet which reads Matsue-jo Nushi Fumaiko Hakogaki (Box written by Fumaiko of Matsue Castle).
Among the successive lords of the Matsue domain was the 7th lord of the Matsudaira family, famous tea master and Zen acolyte Harusato Matsudaira (1751-1818). He is known by many people simply as Fumai, the name he took after shaving his head in retirement in 1806. At the age of 17 he became the lord of the fief; the domain was in dire financial trouble. Harusato appointed Goho Asahi Tanba as chief retainer and promoted a fiscal reconstruction plan. While making great efforts to reduce expenditures, such as reducing debts within the domain and reviewing the domain's personnel structure, they also sought to increase income through industrial promotion measures such as the cultivation of medicinal ginseng and wax. He succeeded in restoring the domain's prosperity. After rebuilding the domain's finances, he focused his efforts on collecting tea utensils that had been scattered one after another from feudal lords of the time. The collected items were later called ``Unshu specialties,'' and are highly valued by lovers of tea ceremony and art. Harusato's great achievement in the history of the tea ceremony was his 18-volume book, in which he further classified famous tea utensils. He also promoted arts and crafts within the Matsue domain, supporting many craftsmen in the worlds of pottery, lacquer, and woodwork.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1487806
The Kura
Price on Request
An exquisite large seated image of Jizo Bosatsu, the protective deity of children and travelers, sits resplendent atop a lotus, one leg dangling, his Shakujo staff and golden Jewel held aloft in his hands. This is a superb rendition, the carving of the face showing great detail and care, the robes flowing with intricate designs, and the entire gilded in gold. This serenely graceful figure exemplifies the idealistic sculptural style that was often employed to convey the special ethos of Pure Land Buddhism: Jizō's warm, truthful facial features give him a compassionate expression that invites faith, which, in turn, will lead to salvation. His gently flowing robe, with its finely crafted gold-leaf designs, enhances the impression of elegant refinement. Edo period, 18th century, the total is 87 cm (almost three feet) tall, the image is 48.5 cm (19 inches) tall including the lowered leg. It is in excellent condition.
We have many more photos of this piece, please inquire if you would like to see them.
Jizō is a Bosatsu (Bodhisattva), one of a group of enlightened beings who choose to delay entry into Nirvana in order to help others. Represented in the guise of a Buddhist monk and devoid of the crown and jewels customarily worn by Bodhisattva, Jizo Bosatsu is among the most readily recognizable and beloved of the many deities in the Japanese Buddhist pantheon. Called Ksitigarbha ("Earth Womb") in Sanskrit, Jizo vowed not to enter Nirvana until the realms of hell were emptied. Primarily known as the Bodhisattva of the Hell Realm, he travels to all of the Six Realms and is a guide and guardian of those between rebirths. In classic iconography, he is depicted as a monk carrying a wish-fulfilling jewel and a staff with six rings, one for each realm. This staff is based on the belief that this deity does not reside in the Pure Land, but rather remains active in this world. His statues are a common sight, especially by roadsides and in graveyards. He is worshiped as the guardian of the souls of Mizuko, stillborn, miscarried, or aborted fetuses, and is considered the protector of children. He is also believed to be one of the protective deities of travelers.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487734
The Kura
sold, thank you
A spectacular collapsed pottery jar from the Karatsu tradition with a purpose-warped wooden lid covered in powdered silver enclosed in a top quality ancient red-lacquered kiri-wood box lined with wave-patterned colored-paper. The ancient box has silver lacquer writing on the top reading Kodai Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Ki, Mizusashi (Ancient Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Period, Mizusashi). The pot is 17 cm (7 inches) diameter, 15 cm (6 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1487733
The Kura
$2,200.00
Sale Pending
A fabulous porcelain incense burner in the shape of a boy playing the flute astride a large ox dating from the 19th century. The box identifies the work as Hirado ware. The quality is certainly of that level. It is 23.5 x 12 x 19 and is in perfect condition, enclosed in a period red-lacquered wooden box.
In Zen, an oxherd searching for his lost ox has served as a parable for a practitioner’s pursuit of enlightenment since this Buddhist sect’s early history in China. In the eleventh century, the Song-dynasty Zen master Guoan Shiyuan codified the parable into ten verses. The parable proceeds from the herd boy losing his ox and following its tracks to recover the animal to transcending this world. This piece represents the sixth step in enlightenment, riding the bull home. This is the point where one has attained understanding. The ancient verse associated with this image reads:
Mounting the bull, slowly
I return homeward.
The voice of my flute intones
through the evening.
Measuring with hand-beats
the pulsating harmony,
I direct the endless rhythm.
Whoever hears this melody
will join me.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1487710 (stock #OC019)
The Kura
$2,900.00
Sale Pending
Reaching for his hat, the boatman leans out arms extended toward the prow, protected from the elements under a woven reed roof. This beautiful incense burner comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 x 8 x 10 cm (9-1/2 x 3-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487678
The Kura
sold, thank you
A carved wooden mask dating from Edo period Japan, likely made as a talisman to ward off evil and bad spirits. It is of thickly carved wood, larger than life, and beautifully modeled. Originally the mask was covered in lacquer and the eyes were silver., remnants of color still visible in the folds and crevices. It is 31 x 25 cm (12 x 10 inches) and is in overall fine condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1487635
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gohon crackled pale glaze covers this Tenmoku shaped Chawan decorated with a blossoming plum harbinger of Spring, signed Sozan followed by a long verse in dramatic calligraphy. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy. Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However, unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
$1,500.00
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487575
The Kura
$900.00
A lovely chawan made of three separate excavated shards connected by lines of gold dating from the Kamakura to early Muromachi periods (13th to 14th centuries). It is 15.7 cm diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an old wooden box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487535
The Kura
$450.00
Rich green glaze covers this elongated delicate undulating bottle from the Kosugi-yaki tradition of the Kaga region near modern day Kanazawa city. This bottle is roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kosugi ware is a type of pottery that was produced in Kosugi Town over four generations for about 80 years, from around the early Bunka era (1810-1820) to the Meiji 20s (around 1890). In the hilly area south of Imizu City that connects Ikeda, Hirano, Ueno, and Hashimotojo, pottery was made in the Kofun period, Nara period, and Heian period, even before Kosugi ware began. This is probably because this area was rich in high-quality clay, which was the raw material for pottery, and red pine trees, which were used as fuel. From the first Yoemon to the fourth generation, pottery production was actively carried out in the former Kosugi Town (hereinafter referred to as Kosugi Town). The first generation Yoemon (given name Yoichiro) traveled throughout the land and mastered the technique of Soma ware (Fukushima prefecture), before returning to his hometown at the age of 30 to open a kiln. Kosugi ware rapidly spread its fame, and in the Tenpo era, it received a pottery license from the Kaga domain, and with the support of the county magistrate, reached its peak. The first Yoemon passed away in August 1838. The second generation Yoemon (young name Yojuro) took over at the age of 30. Many of the first-generation sake bottles were somewhat small, with a wonderful sculptural sense, and the green glaze had a beautiful color and luster that was slightly bright.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487485
The Kura
sold, thank you
Ring in the New Year with this beautifully cast bronze bell surmounted by a dragon embellished with Characters of good fortune enclosed in an ancient red-lacquered wooden storage box. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 21 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1487484
The Kura
$2,500.00
A carved wood figure of a wandering priest, robes billowing in the wind, his large straw hat full of holes, signed Yasuchika on the back. Dating from the late Edo to Meiji period, it is by a member of the Tsuchiya Yasuchika lineage. The figure is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, complete with walking stick.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
$600.00
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1487457
The Kura
$400.00
A set of four long low doors from an alcove painted with the scene of men floating logs downt the Hozu river from Kameoka into Kyoto’s Arashiyama district. This was a favorite scene of Nihonga artists from time immemorial. The scee is performed with ink and gofun powdered shell on paper with applied gold flake, each panel wrapped in a black lacquered frame with bronze handles. 47 x 29 cm (18-1/2 x 11-1/2 inches) and they are made for an opening 185.5 x 28.5 cm (73 x 11-1/4 inches). Overall excellent condition, signed by the artist on the far right.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1487456 (stock #LAC085)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of five Mokko-gata (elongated-lobed) kashi-zara wood dishes, each uniquely decorated with seasonal flora in raised lacquer with mother of pearl and lead inlay enclosed in an older wooden storage box. The artist has made excellent use of the natural wood grain, allowing it to fomr a backdrop like bushes and garden stones for the subdued tones of gold, silver and shimmering mother of pearl. Each dish is 18.5 x 14 cm (7-1/4 x 5-3/4 inches) and all are in excellent condition, dating from the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487372
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of seven nesting cups in pale glaze, each piece bearing the seal of Aoki Mokubei. The largest cup is 7 cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 6 cm (5-1/4 inches) tall and all are in excellent condition. They come wrapped in a silk pouch enclosed in ag darkened kiri-wood box bound by deer leather and later titled and annotated by Kiyomizu Rokubei, dated the third month of the year 2600 (1940).
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
Aoki Mokubei (Sahei ,1767-1833) was born in central Kyoto. He reportedly studied calligraphy during his youth; however, chose pottery as his profession and opened a studio in Awataguchi when he was 30. In 1805 he was ordered to serve at Awata Palace. The next year, he was invited to create pottery by the Maeda Family of the Kaga Domain in Kanazawa. After a brief sojourn in Kyoto he returned to Kanazawa in 1807, where he established the Kasuga-yama kiln. Later he returned permanently to Kyoto where he continued his pottery development and research. He researched many different styles of ceramic art such as European, Cochin ware, Chinese, Korean, blue and white pottery, aka-e (enamel decoration on porcelain), Dehua pottery, and Mishima ware. He is credited mainly with tea utensils, focusing mainly on kettles, and those creations became the foundation for modern Japanese tea utensils, referred to today as “Mokubei style”. In addition to pottery, he excelled in painting and Chinese Studies, and moved in intellectual.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487331
The Kura
$2,500.00
A shard has been grafted into the side of this large misshapen Shino bottle dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period, the repair lined with gold. Gold also circle the neck where the discarded misfire was repaired, and gleams on the lip. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an age darkened wooden box titled Ko-Shino Tokkuri, Shoki no Kama (Old Shino Tokkuri, early Kiln era)
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. It is said that this technique was used as a sign of reconciliation between two warring factions during the Sengoku Period, the era of warfare surrounding the 1500s. It was common for the leaders of these factions to hold tea ceremonies with each other to negotiate peace. It is said that, when the negotiations were successful, yobitsugi was used to combine the tea sets used at the meeting where peace was decided.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1800 item #1487278
The Kura
$800.00
A bucolic scene of temples and rugged seaside hills dotted with pagodas in silver and gold wraps around the black surface of this deep tray dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period (16th-17th century). It is 27 cm (10-1/2 inches) diameter, 8.5 cm (3-3/8 inches) tall. The bottom has been re-lacquered at some time in the past. There is wear and cracks to the inside typical of age and use, and the rim has been re-done in gin-dame powdered tarnished-silver, which blends well with the ancient feeling of the piece.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487235
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Tea Pot by Otagaki Rengetsu with a handle like bamboo root inscribed with a poem which reads: Ko no kimi wa
medetaki fushi wo
kasane tsutsu
sue no yo nagaki
tameshi nari keri.
This translates as:
Our young bamboo
piling up happy knots
year upon year—
its tips reaching high
a paragon to us.
It is roughly 10 cm (4 inches) diameter. And comes enclosed in a wooden box annotated by Koen of Jinkoin temple, where Rengetsu lived. On the side of the box is written what appears to be Kae-ichinen san-gatsu (3rd month of 1848), Otagaki Rengetsu Ni Waka iri Dobin (Pot engraved with Poem by Nun Otagaki Rengetsu). It appears the handle has been broken and repaired twice, and there is a tiny chip in the rim of the lid (see pictures).
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1487200
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully cast bronze dragon waterspout from an ancient Japanese garden in Nara prefecture made to rise over the edge of a water basin, the water trickling out through his mouth. It retains the original bronze pipe and connector, overall, in excellent original condition. The dragon itself is roughly 25 x 13 x 20 cm tall (10 x 5 x 8 inches) and weighs 3.9 kg (8.5 pounds). Including the pipe roughly 50 cm long.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #1487190
The Kura
$2,500.00
A Hikeshi-Banten Fireman Jacket decorated with protective images of waves and birds outside in various dyed colors and sashiko stitching, the inside emblazoned with a dragon and tiger; symbols respectively of wisdom and protection (the dragon is a water god) and ferocity and bravery as the tiger knows no fear. The handmade coats were fashioned from several layers of highly absorbent quilted cotton fabric. They were then resist-dyed using the tsutsugaki method, which involved drawing rice-paste designs on the cloth, dyeing the cloth multiple times and then washing off the paste to reveal the layering of colors. They were worn plain side out and before firefighters entered the scene of a blaze, the coats were thoroughly soaked in water (they could weigh more than 75 pounds) to protect the men from burns and blunt the impact of falling objects as they went about their dangerous work. If firefighters were successful in extinguishing the blaze, they would turn their coats inside out and parade victoriously by cheering onlookers. According to the Denver Art Museum:
Decoration was important to firefighters’ garments, which were far from purely utilitarian uniforms. Firefighters enjoyed respect and high status in urban Japan, especially in Edo, where wood architecture and crowded living conditions led to frequent outbreaks of fire. Commoners wore reversible coats (hikeshi-banten) made of thick, quilted cotton fabric, with a plain indigo-dyed exterior and an elaborately decorated interior.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Pre 2000 item #1487188
The Kura
$2,800.00
A lacquer tray made for the Urasenke Tea School enclosed in a wooden box titled Kanshitsu Umehana Bon (Dried Lacquer Plum Blossom Tray) signed Konnichi followed by the Ka-o signature of the 15th Grand Master of Urasenke Sen Soshitsu (Hounsai). The 5 lobed tray is 26.5 cm (10-1/2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, signed underneath Tatsu.
Kuroda Tatsuaki (1904-1982) was born into a family of Kyoto lacquer ware artisans; in his mid-teens, he began to study lacquer art on his own. He was studied in the Mingei Movement under potter Kawai Kanjiro, which led Kuroda to further deepen his own art of woodworking. His policy of handling the entire process by himself, from creating the base, to lacquer application and decoration, set him apart from his peers. In 1970, he became the first person in the field of woodworking to be designated as a Living National Treasure.
Sen Sōshitsu XV is the 15th-generation Grand Master of Urasenke, which is one of the most widely known schools of Japanese tea, and served in official capacity from 1964 to 2002. In 1949, he received the Zen title Hōunsai.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1487187
The Kura
$2,800.00
A beautifully crafted cast, carved, and parcel gilt bronze image of a samurai pulling back, arrow nocked, ready to let fly, signed in a metal cartouche on back Shunko-saku (made by Shunko). It is roughly 27.5 cm (11 inches) to the top of his hat, 25 cm (10 inches) from forefinger to elbow. The warrior is calm, determined, with a look of deep concentration in his inlaid eyes. He wears an eboshi, a formal type of hat, and is dressed in sumptuous, loose fitting robes with leggings and braces to protect his arms and legs. A short sword juts from his waist. The warrior's robes and pants feature large wagon wheel mon, known as genji guruma. The signed box identifies the figure as Minamoto no Tametomo (1139 - 1170) was a celebrated historical samurai of the Heian Period. Known for his impressive archery skills, he features as one of the epic warriors of the Hogen Rebellion, a precursor to the Genpei War. It is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1487186
The Kura
Sale Pending
An Edo period coat (haubergeon) and “kote” (mitons) of linked chain over layers of indigo dyed blue cloth decorated with family crests in gold. The chain, Kikko collar, outer layers of cloth and leather piping are all in overall excellent condition, the original pale blue lining is much worn away. This is made for an adult.
In Japan, mail is called kusari which means chain. When the word kusari is used in conjunction with an armored item it usually means that mail makes up the majority of the armor composition. Kusari jackets, hoods, gloves, vests, shin guards, shoulder guards, thigh guards, and other armored clothing were produced, even kusari socks. Kusari gusoku or chain armor was commonly used during the Edo period 1603 to 1868 as a stand-alone defense. According to George Cameron Stone: Entire suits of mail kusari gusoku were worn on occasions, sometimes under the ordinary clothing. In his book Arms and Armor of the Samurai: The History of Weaponry in Ancient Japan, Ian Bottomley shows a picture of a kusari armor and mentions kusari katabira (chain jackets) with detachable arms being worn by samurai police officials during the Edo period. The end of the samurai era in the 1860s, along with the 1876 ban on wearing swords in public, marked the end of any practical use for mail and other armor in Japan. Japan turned to a conscription army and uniforms replaced armor.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487185
The Kura
$2,400.00
A very large mask of heavily carved wood covered in black lacquer with golden eyes dating from the mid Edo period (18th century). There are minor losses to the lacquer on the cheeks and along the edges typical of age. It is 37.5 x 30 cm (14-1/2 x 12 inches) and is in overall fine condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1950 item #1487184
The Kura
sold, thank you
Long armed shrimp, a symbol in any culture of a festive meal, decorate in red the shunkei lacquered surfaces of these turned bamboo basins called Haisen made for washing sake cups between drinks. Each bowl is turned from a bamboo node, celebrating the natural basin formed by the bamboo tree and used from time immemorial in Asia. They are 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original kiri-wood box signed Shunko.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1487183
The Kura
sold, thank you
A stunning large Menuki in the form of a writhing dragon of gilt copper dating from the 19th century, It is 7.5 cm (3 inches) long and in perfect condition, retaining both the original studs on back unused. The Year of the Dragon is coming up!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1486460
The Kura
$500.00
A beautiful 2 Stage lacquered container covered in black lacquer decorated with flowering vines. The domed lid opens to reveal a circular tray removable to open a deep container. It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1486269
The Kura
$1,500.00
An antique gilt bronze Buddhist tower finial with three pierced flame flanges richly engraved with scrolling vines mounted on a hardwood pedestal It is 53 cm tall and in overall excellent condition.