The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #1475783
The Kura
$1,600.00
Gold gleams on the dragon shaped prow of this boat shaped object in the style of Kyoto’s Ninsei ware. The house on top is meant to be filled with ash and serves as an incense burner. Removed it reveals a glazed compartment in which flowers can be placed, allowing the versatile object to be not only a display on its own, but also to act as a vase and or incense burner. It is 41 x 16 x 25 cm (16-1/2 x 6 x 10 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in an ancient wooden storage box dating from the 19th to opening years of the 20th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1475475
The Kura
$1,500.00
Deer prance about in abbreviated Art-Deco windows on this large vase by Okamoto Tameji enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakuji Asobu-Shika-zu Kabin (Vase in pale porcelain decorated with playing Deer). It is 33.5 tall, 32.5 cm (roughly 13 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. Stylistically it is consistent with his works from the early 1930s.
Okamoto Tameji (1901-1958) was born in in the International Port city of Kobe and raised in Kyoto, the artistic and cultural heartland of Japan. He attended the Kyoto Municipal Tojiki Shikenjo Ceramic Research Facility, and apprenticed under Kawamura Seizan. He was first accepted into the Bunten/Teiten National Exhibition in 1927, and was selected for and awarded there consistently both pre and post war. His works were featured at the Chicago, San Francisco and New York Expositions.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1475459
The Kura
$450.00
Sale Pending
A quintessential Art-Deco vase by innovative artist Ito Suikko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakuseiji Kabin (White-blue Porcelain Vase) dating from the 1930s-1940s. It is 30 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ito Suiko (1894-1980) was born in Kyoto and studied under Imperial Art Academy artist Ito Tozan, establishing his own kiln in 1931. He was exhibited consistently at the prestigious Bunten/Teiten/Nitten exhibitions throughout his career, and later served as judge for the Nitten.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1475452
The Kura
$1,800.00
An image of Kannon in celadon robes, the revealed flesh in raw clay by Suwa Sozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 18 cm (7 inches9) tall and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1475412 (stock #OC085)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of six porcelain Tokkuri Sake Flasks decorated with enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seika Keshi Sakabin (Poppy Decorated Sake Bottles, Set of Six).. Each is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) tall and all are in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1800 item #1475286
The Kura
$650.00
A small portable rack commonly called a Te-nugui-kake (wash Towel Stand) covered in black lacquer with ornate brass fittings and decorated with the Mitsuba-Hidari Aoi Domoe (Left Swirling Triple Hollyhock) crest restricted to the use of the Tokugawa Shogun family. It breaks down into 5 pieces for portability and storage. Assembled it is 68.5 x 22.5 x 58 cm (27 x 9 x 23 inches) and is in overall good condition considering its age. There are chips to the edges and other mars typical of use.
It is said that the reason Tokugawa Ieyasu adopted the Aoi, which was originally the crest of Kamigamo Shrine, as a family crest, was that he wanted to prove the dignity of the origin of his samurai family as parishioners of Kamigamo-jinja Shrine, which descended from the Nitta-Genji clan. There are many versions of the Mitsuba Aoi crest of the Edo Shogunate, those in use by the government, and those in use by branch families and tributaries, however the left swirling crest (as seen here) was restricted for the use of the direct lineage of the Shogun. It is, in fact, quite a rarity.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1700 item #1475285
The Kura
sold, thank you
From the Shoguns table to yours…why not? This is a lacquer tray elevated on scrolling legs decorated with squirreling tendrils and Mitsuba-Hidari Aoi Domoe (Left Swirling Triple Hollyhock) crests from the Shogun family. The flat surface is festive red with chirashi-mon design (scattered crests) duplicating that on the outside. The table is 38 cm (15 inch4s) square, 20 cm (8 inches) tall and in fairly good condition considering its age. There are chips to the edges and other mars typical of use.
It is said that the reason Tokugawa Ieyasu adopted the Aoi, which was originally the crest of Kamigamo Shrine, as a family crest, was that he wanted to prove the dignity of the origin of his samurai family as parishioners of Kamigamo-jinja Shrine, which descended from the Nitta-Genji clan. There are many versions of the Mitsuba Aoi crest of the Edo Shogunate, those in use by the government, and those in use by branch families and tributaries, however the left swirling crest (as seen here) was restricted for the use of the direct lineage of the Shogun. It is, in fact, quite a rarity.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1475187
The Kura
$1,900.00
An incredible Mishima Chawan dating from the Edo period with a wide repair to the rim in dark lacquer decorated with golden grasses in gold maki-e lacquer designs. It comes in an ancient dilapidated silk pouch with cotton buffer enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box titled Mishima Chawan. The bowl is 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall, 12.5 -13.5 cm (5-1/2 -6 inches) diameter and in fine condition. Mishima ware refers to different types of imported and adopted Japanese pottery. Mishima originally refers to the shimamono pottery imported from the islands of Taiwan, Luzon, and "Amakawa" (Macau). They were characterized by being roughly-made and often uneven, thus epitomizing the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi. HOwever the term overall came to refer to impressed and slip-inlayed ceramics in the Korean style like this bowl.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1475185
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of two matching black lacquered bowls and lined with gold decorated with gold designs for use when drinking sake with a shared cup to rinse the bowl between users. This type of bowl is called a Haisen (Literally cup washing bowl) and was a common accoutrement to drinking sake in Japan prior to the second world war. They are 14.5 cm diameter9 cm tall and in excellent condition, each enclosed in a red lacquered wooden box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1475140
The Kura
$1,400.00
An Edo period Kogo incense case of pale earth tones deocorated with geometric shapes and green copper glaze in the oribe style with a scrawling streak of kintsugi gold extending down two sides. Kintsugi is the art of repairing using lacquer and powdered gold. The piece is roughly 7 cm (3 inches) diameter and comes wrapped in an antique padded silk wrapping cloth in an age darkened kiri-wood box with deer leather ties. The box is annotated Ko-Oribe Ume-gata Kogo (Old Oribe Plum-shaped Incense Container) by Seisai, (1863-1937), the 12th head of the Omotesenkei School of Tea.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1475127
The Kura
$1,750.00
Sale Pending
A striking soft-glazed six-sided incense burner by Maki Hokusai decorated with white flower blossoms on soft flesh colored glaze surmounted by a silver lid pierced with the character Kotobuki (Fortune) by Hata Zoroku. The pot itself is 10 cm tall, plus the sliver lid. It comes in an ancient wooden box signed by Zoroku.
Hata Zoroku I (1823-1890) learned metalwork techniques in the studio of Ryubundo in Kyoto. Hata produced works for the Imperial Household and it is known that he made the gold Imperial seal and national seal by order of the Imperial Household in 1873. He was under consideration as Artist to the Imperial Household (Teishitsu Gigeiin). He died several days before the announcement of these designations in 1890. For bronze works by Zoroku in the collection of the Imperial Household, see The Era of Meiji Bijutsu-kai and Nihon Kinko Kyokai, in Meiji bijutsu saiken I (Reappraisal of Meiji Art I) (Tokyo: Museum of the Imperial Collections, Sannomaru Shozokan, 1995), pp. 40-41.
Maki Hokusai (Bunshichi, 1782-1857) established a pottery workshop in the West district of Nagoya city during the Bunka era (1804-18). Hokusai was a master at sculpture and studied painting technique under Gekkoku. He decorated with bright colors and vivid detailed landscapes. Known as a master craftsman for making tea utensils, sake utensils, ornaments, etc., he worked for the 12th lord of the Owari clan, Tokugawa Naritaka, and produced works in the Hagiyama Niwa-yaki kiln of the Feudal lord. The kiln continued for three generations, but due to the expansion of Nagoya Station, the kiln was abandoned around 1923.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1475084
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large storage jar in austere dark clay with a thick smattering of amber glaze on the shoulder dating from the early 17th century. This is the highly sought Shigaraki ware, and finding pieces of this brittle clay in such fine condition is rare. It is 39 cm tall and in overall excellent condition. There is one very old chip to the rim.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1474978
The Kura
sold, thank you
Joyful maple leaves in gold and silver float on the festrive red surface of this set of three stacking lacquered cups dating from the later Edo period. The larger cup is 12.5 cm (roughly 5 inches) diameter and they are in overall fine condition. They come in a paper lined black lacquered wooden box. There are a couple stable cracks in the wood substrate visible as ridges in the lacquer of the largest bowl (see close-up photos).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1474977
The Kura
$765.00
A distinctive set of wooden plates in red and black lacquer by Ohashi Sobei dating from the early 20th century made for the service of traditional Japanese Kaiseki Cuisine. The plates are made with a circular base surrounded by opposing loops in red and black. Very unusual and visually striking. Each is 19 x 16.5 x 2.5 cm (7-3/4 x 6-1/2 x 1 inch) and all are in excellent condition. Each comes in a unique cloth pouch enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Wa-chigai Kashizara, go Kyaku (5 Sweets dishes with opposing rings).
The first generation of the Ohashi Sobei family was a disciple of the fourth generation Sotetsu, and was so trusted as to be appointed the guardian of Sotetsu V. The second generation Sobei was a disciple of Sotetsu VII, and became the guardian of the Sotetsu VIII, however died young. The third generation served as a craftsman of the eighth generation Sotetsu, and it is said that most of the works attributed to Sotetsu at that time were actually made by Sobei III. He too was appointed the guardian of the ninth Sotetsu in the late Meiji period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1474953
The Kura
sold, thank you
The pure and elegant simplicity of this set of Haisen is right up my alley, and certainly representative of the Japanese aesthetic surrounding reverence of nature and natural materials. These two deep bowls are turned from the node of a large bamboo, allowing the natural undulating node itself to form the bottom. They are then covered simply in black lacquer, the only decoration a gold circle about the rim. They come in the original age darkened wooden box and are in excellent condition. Each is roughly 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and both are in excellent condition dating from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1474892
The Kura
sold, thank you
A magnificent set of five wooden bowls lacquered red with a net design enclosed in the original wooden box titled Shu-nuri Amime Hashiaraiwan dating from the first half of the 20th century. Excluding the lid each is 7.5 cm (3 inches) tall, roughly the same diameter at the rim, and all are in excellent condition. Repeated use of lacquer tends to see the black acquire a brown tinge. These remain jet black, and it is likely they have been virtually unused for the better part of a century.
Hashiaraiwan (also called Hitokuchiwan) are used after the first four courses in Kaiseki food to clear the pallet, ordinarily a thin soup or something light. The literal meaning is washing the chopsticks bowl.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1910 item #1474794 (stock #OC004)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gold dragons prance about the vermillion surface of this exquisite vessel by important Meiji potter Eiraku Zengoro XIV (Tokuzen) enclosed in the original signed wooden box which is in turn enclosed in an outer box also annotated by a later generation Eiraku. Remembered specifically for his mastery of Aka-e Kinsai ware, this is a museum worthy example of this important potters work. It is 43 cm (17 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Eiraku Tokuzen (Eiraku Zengoro XIV, 1853-1909) was born the first son of the 12th generation Eiraku Wazen He was named the 14th Zengoro at the age of 18 in 1871. This was only a couple years after the Fall of the Shogunate and restoration of the Meiji emperor, a hard time for potters specializing in Tea ware, which was experiencing a backlash as did many things associated with what had been traditional societal ranking and privilege. However Tokuzen worked hard to both maintain ties with the tea world, while making efforts to embrace a global audience. In 1873 Eiraku wares were exhibited at the Vienna World Exposition, and in 1876, Philadelphia, then Paris in 1878. At the same time new approaches to pottery pioneered by Eiraku were exhibited at the 1875 Kyoto Hakurankai in the cultural heartland of Japan. In 1882 he opened in a new Kiln in the Eastern hills called the Kikutani Kiln (Valley of Chrysanthemum) specializing in high end tea ware for both Maccha and Sencha teas, while expanding into daily wares for the growing middle class.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1474709
The Kura
sold, thank you
Additional photos of this fabulous Accordion book of 12 paintings by Kimura Seiun enclosed in a wooden box titled Atami Dan Ko-gasatsu and dated early Spring of Showa 4 (1929). The introductory page is written by Zen priest Hashimoto Dokuzan of Tenryuji Temple in Kyoto. The paintings are each signed with various names used by Kimura, mostly Seiun or Ren. The introductory and concluding pages are both dated 1929. It is 28 x 14 cm (5-1/2 x 11 inches) and in overall outstanding condition.
Atami is a place in Japan on the Izu peninsula South of Tokyo in Shizuoka prefecture.
  Kimura Seiun (1885-1967) was born in Shimane prefecture, home of one of the oldest and most venerated shrines in Japan, Izumo Taisha Shrine. His given name was Hara Renzaburo however he was adopted into the Kimura family taking that name. In 1921 he moved to Kyoto where he studied painting under Miyazaki Chikuso, and them to Tokyo where he studied under Komura Suiun. Post war he returned to Shimane, devoting himself to painting and private exhibitions, leading the quiet life of a scholar.
Hashimoto Dokuzan (Gengi, 1869-1938) was born in Nîigata, and was sent to Kyoto at the age of 16 to study painting and philosophy under the important literatus Tomioka Tessai. At the age of 20 he entered Tenryuji Temple under Hashimoto Gazan, later receiving Inka (recognition of enlightenment) from Ryuen. In 1910 he moved to Sokokuji, and then was assigned the foundation of Nanonji Temple in Tottori Prefecture. He served as abbot of Tenryuji Temple and Sokokuji, both important Zen temples in Kyoto.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1474626
The Kura
sold, thank you
A black bird sporting a tufted beak shelters among the thick foliage of fresh bamboo by the easily identifiable and quite rare artist Sakakibara Shiho performed with pigment on silk in the original signed double wood box titled Mosochiku Hakkacho (Crested Myna Bird in Moso Bamboo), a favorite motif by the artist dating from the Taisho period. It is bordered in fine pattered silk threaded with gold and is appointed with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). A major work, the scroll is 55.5 x 222.5 cm (inches) and in overall fine condition.
Sakakibara Shiho (1887 – 1971) was born in Kyoto and studied traditional Japanese painting at the Kyoto City School of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1907, then moved on to the Kyoto Municipal School of Painting (mod University of Art). While at the school, his works were accepted (1909) and awarded (1911) into the Bunten National Exhibition. He graduated there in 1913. With his radical style garnering disapproval in official circles, in 1918, along with Tsuchida Bakusen, Irie Hakko, Ono Chikkyo and Murakami Kagaku founded the Kokuga Sosaku Kyokai. The organization changed its name to the Kokugakai in 1928, the same year Shiho took a position at his alma mater where he was awarded a professorship in 1937. He was awarded for his life’s work by the Nihon Geijutsu-in (Japan Art Academy) in 1962. Happily, the Kokuga-kai has outlived its founders, and is still exhibiting annually to this day. Works are held in the collections of the Seattle Art Museum, The Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art, the Adachi Museum as well as the Otani memorial Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1940 item #1474344
The Kura
$1,750.00
A tall Art Deco era bronze vase by important artist Nakajima Yasumi enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated Showa 7 (1932). It is 37.5 cm (15 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base Yasumi. The inscription inside the box translates: This vase was created to commemorate the event his Imperial Majesty the Emperor purchased a vase identical to this upon his royal visit to Osaka Castle, dated Showa 7 (1932).
The name of Nakajima first came to notice in 1908, when the first generation Yasumi (1877-1951) was awarded at the Senkatsu Kinen Exhibition. He was a consistent exhibitor with the Teiten-Nitten national exhibitions and was also quite active abroad, being prized at the 1931 Belgian Exposition and serving as juror for the Japanese submissions to the Paris Exposition in 1925 where he was subsequently prized. His work is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency and he served as mentor to a generation of young bronze artists.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1473954
The Kura
$1,100.00
An ornate porcelain image of a horse draped in full regalia by Miyanaga Tozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The detail about the head is fabulous, and the artist has done an excellent job capturing the musculature of the creature while allowing something ethereal. In Japan horses (and cows and foxes and deer and lots of other creatures) are often enshrined as messengers or embodiments of the gods in Shinto. This is 21 x 9 x 23.5 cm (9-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Miyanaga Tozan I (1868-1941) is one of the most important names in Kyoto ceramics. He was born in Ishikawa prefecture, and graduated from the (now) Tokyo University of Art. While a government employee, he represented Japan at Arts Expositions, and studied art in Europe before returning to Japan in 1902 to devote himself to the production of ceramics, with great emphasis on celadon, one of the most difficult of all ceramic wares. He was direct teacher or mentor to a number of prominent artists including Kitaoji Rosanjin and Arakawa Toyozo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1473684 (stock #OC006)
The Kura
$2,650.00
A fabulous example exploring the various traits of traditional Shigaraki pottery with a thick swath of glaze covering one side, telltale feldspathic inclusions bursting from the raw clay opposite. This is a classic example of 16th century Shigaraki pottery. It is 29 x 31 x 35 cm (11-1/2 x 12 x 14 inches) and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1920 item #1473520
The Kura
$500.00
Sale Pending
A sage with his deer companion wanders the wilderness wrapping around this bamboo incense container dating from the ealy 20th century (late Meiji to Taisho period). It is 33.5 cm long (13-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition, a superb example of the genre. This would have been used to hold incense sticks.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1920 item #1473519
The Kura
$600.00
Sale Pending
The androgynous Kannon sits in meditation under climbing rocks and tumbling waves deeply carved into the side of this bamboo incense container dating from the early 20th century (late Meiji to Taisho period). It is 34 cm long (13-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition, a superb example of the genre. This would have been used to hold incense sticks.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1473505 (stock #OC049)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Kintsugi gold repair provides a flash of gold on the much-used richly color-stained glaze of this Early Edo Takahara Yaki Chawan Tea bowl enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box titled Takahara Yaki Hira Chawan. The box is annotated inside followed by a Ka-o stylized signature. There is also a separate Kiwame letter enclosed. The bowl is 15.3 cm (6 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. Takahara Yaki began with Takahara Tobei (Fujihei) who hailed from Higo in modern day Kumamoto prefecture, and later Takahara Heizaburo. Tobei established a kiln near Shitennoji in Osaka specializing in tea ware during the Keicho era (1596-1615) especially known for Korai Korean and Raku wares. Later a second kiln was opened in Omi (modern day Shiga) which specialized in pottery of the Awata tradition. In 1653, On the recommendation of Katagiri Sekishu, the family split, and under orders of the Edo shogunate Heizaburo opened a kiln in front of Asakusa in Tokyo. So in fact there are three lines of Takahara Yaki, Osaka, Shiga and Tokyo. This is likely from the original Osaka kiln and dates from the 17th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1473331 (stock #OC051)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A striking Peacock feather colored flambe glazed vase by Leading Kyoto Potter Uno Ninmatsu enclosed in a signed wooden box dated the 10th month of Showa 5 (October 1930). It is 28 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Uno Ninmatsu (1864-1937) was born in Kyoto son of potter Wada Sohei and studied under his father as well as from a young age Seifu Yohei II then future Imperial Art Academy artist Seifu Yohei III until setting up his own studio at the age of 21. Outgoing by comparison to the normal Kyoto ideal, he promoted Kyoto art and culture and actively sought to invigorate the export market (then dominated by Tokyo and Yokohama). He won a bronze medal at the Paris world exposition in 1901, and gold medal at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904, Belgium in 1905 and Milan the following year. Unlike other potters in Kyoto at this time, he did not overly decorate his works, but concentrated on matte glazes and form in austere glaze techniques. This proved very popular, and from the turn of the century his works were highly sought in the United States. He also worked closely with designers in France, where many of his works were exported. Following the first world war, he retired to the domestic market. He was deeply involved in silk road pottery research and mastered Shinsha (flambe glazes) as well as Turkish Blue and other styles not yet produced at that time in Kyoto. He was father and mentor to Uno Soyo and Uno Sango, and served as mentor to the young Isamu Noguchi.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1473297 (stock #MW010)
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A rare iron hanging censer in the shape of a Mongolian Saddle Stirrup (Abumi) with silver mesh lid covering half the top. It comes in an age-darkened and worm-eaten kiri-wood box titled simply Tsuri Koro. The receptacle is 13.5 x 7 x 15 cm (5-1/2 x 3 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1473244 (stock #NW002)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A quintessential Iga vase dating from the Edo period, the rough clay covered in thick ash glaze. It is viciously charred, testament to the tempest in the kiln, with molten ash flowing freely over the surface. This is a perfect complement to a Japanese chashitsu tea room or traditional flower display. It is 24.5 cm (9-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. In a Japanese tea ceremony room, historically vases were made to match the ambiance of the humble setting. Although I did not write it: Starting in the Momoyama period (16th century), Mimitsuki Iga ware vases with characteristic "ear" lugs appeared. and thus became the popular norm. Since then the ears have become a mark of not only Iga flower vessels but also Mizusashi water jars. They were used as Japanese tea utensils under master Sen no Rikkyu and others. Old Iga ware, which is known as Ko-Iga, generally reflects Wabi-Sabi aesthetics with a rustic appearance and purposefully deformed shapes, given extra character by the addition of "ear" lugs and intentional gouges and dents.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1473156
The Kura
$1,600.00
Sale Pending
An early Edo period Ki-Seto sake cup repurposed with a silver lid pierced with a chrysanthemum to function as an incense burner enclosed in a custom made silk pouch and bamboo case dating the transformation to New Years of Kae-7 (1854). Without the lid it is 5.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1473114
The Kura
$1,500.00
Sale Pending
A rare stacking Bento (picnic) box in the shape of a tea leaf storage jar decorated in a realistic fashion with black, silver and gold maki-e lacquer. It consists of four pieces, stacked they are 28 cm (11 inches) tall, and all are in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1473106 (stock #TCR7105)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A lifelike turtle from the Kikko kilns of Osaka, the bottom stamped and covered in brown lacquer, the top traditional kikko ocher tinged colors. There are chips around the edges, without which it would be tough to define this hyper realistic piece as pottery. It is 16.5 x 11 x 6 cm (6-1/2 inches long), dating from the later Edo period. The Kikko Kiln was established in Osaka in the opening years of the 19th century by Iyo native Toda Jihe, who had learned the ceramic arts in Kyoto under all of the great names of the time, Kiyomizu Rokubei I, Ryonyu the 9th generation head of the Raku family, and Ninnami Dohachi among others. He would be known as Jusanken Shogetsu. After being noticed by then Daimyo of Osaka area Mizuno Tadakuni, he received the kiln name Kikko. His works were distributed as gifts among the Daimyo, and he was called to work in many fiefs creating “Niwa Yaki” kilns throughout Japan. During the Meiji the kiln would be split into two continuing lineages, one using Jusanken stamp, the other Kikko Shogetsu.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1920 item #1473099
The Kura
$2,200.00
A bronze crane in dark almond colored patina of superb craftsmanship dating from the late 19th to early 20th century (Meiji period). It is quite large at 48.5 cm tall (19 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1472954
The Kura
$399.00
An Edo period lacquered Bashaku Water Scoop covered in mother of pearl flakes decorated with the Kikusui-mon Crest in gold, vermilion lacquer within. It is 59.5 cm (roughly 2 feet) long and in overall fine condition with minor losses typical of age and use. The name Bashaku literally means horse scoop, and indicates these were used for watering horses on the road.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1472430
The Kura
$1,500.00
Sale Pending
Rustic Irabo style glaze covers this Edo period Hidaka-yaki Mizusashi covered in a black lacquered tsukuibuta sculpted wood lid. It is 15.5 cm (6 inches) diameter, 16cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The piece is published in the book Kishu Zenmyoji yaki (1986) figure 46. A copy of the book is included. It comes enclosed in an old wooden storage box with separate compartment for the lid.
This type of earthenware is from one of the commissioned kilns of the Kishu Domain. Also known as Zenmyoji-yaki, the kiln was established by Genryo, the 6th generation chief priest of Zenmyoji in Shima Village in Hidaka Country, during the Kyoho era (1716 – 1735).
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1472380 (stock #L003)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted wooden tray covered in black lacquer carved in the Kamakura Bori tradition from the Hakkodo Studio enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kamakura Bori Kashi Bachi Hana Karakusa (Kamakura Carved Vessel with Scrolling Flower Design). It is 36.5 x 26.5 x 5.5 cm (14-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
In the 12th-13th centuries, when Kamakura prospered as the samurai capital, Zen Buddhism was introduced from China, and many Zen temples were built, including Kamakura Gozan. The architectural style of these temples was modeled after the Tang style of China and he interior decoration, furniture, and Buddhist altar fittings were similarly Tang style. Along with Zen. celadons, bronze vases, Tsuishu and other cultural objects were brought from China. Tsuishu is a vessel formed only with layers of lacquer, and a pattern is carved on the surface. A very time-consuming process, these usually small articles were highly valued. Wood-carved lacquered incense cases imitating this were made by carving a vessel of wood and applying lacquer to finish it. This is believed to be the beginning of Kamakura-bori, and it is accepted that it was made by a Buddhist sculptors for temples. In the Momoyama period, the design and carving became dynamic and deep moving away from imitation to an art form of its own. In the Edo period, we can see a growth in production, with even everyday items such as tea utensils and braziers being produced, as well as larger secular works such as trays and even small furnishings. Around this time, the name 'Kamakura-bori' began to appear in books dealing with tea utensils. The Goto family, the current head of Hakkodo, descended from the Kei school of Buddhist sculptors who came from Nara to create Buddhist statues for Zen Buddhist temples. Due to the Meiji government's edict to abolish Buddhism, they moved to revive and reinvent the Meiji Kamakura-bori. From the Meiji through the Taisho and into the Showa era, new techniques were developed and established as a field of crafts. After the war, Kamayama Mitsuhashi and Shuntaro Goto formed an association, and in 1977, Kamakura Bori was designated a traditional craft.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1472342
The Kura
sold, thank you
A ceramic box decorated with red and white camellia blossoms on vivid green dating from the early 20th century and bearing the artist seal on the base. It is glazed with pale earthen white inside, bearing a design of interlocked rings on the lid, and a huge flower inside the basin. It is 18.5 x 18.5 x 11 cm (7-1/4 x 7-1/4 x 4-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.