The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493526 (stock #K101)
The Kura
$750.00
A timid looking creature in dilapidated straw hat sheepishly approaches carrying his ledger and bottle for a refill. A comic image of the Tanuki with his famous beer belly reputation for heavy drinking. One can guess he will be asking for tonight’s bottle on credit as he gazes up, shoulders hunched, pleading. It is 16 cm (6 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the back in a silver inlayed cartouche Chikusen.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1493375 (stock #K095)
A set of five covered pottery bowls by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Suimono Wan. The basic setting in Japanese food is Ichiju-Sansai or one soup, three dishes. So instead of mixing everything on one plate, each part of the meal is given its own dish. Suimono Wan are bowls for clear soup served between parts of the meal to cleanse the palette. These bowls are 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 8 cm tall. One bowl has a gold repair to the lid, otherwise they are all in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1493206 (stock #K099)
The Kura
$5,500.00
Sale Pending
Flowers blossom all about this soft pink vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan I published in the book Miyagawa Kozan Yukasai (2018), page 32 figure 25. A copy of the book will be included. It comes in a modern wooden storage box. According to the book it was made circa 1902. The vase is 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) diameter, 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493138 (stock #K081)
The Kura
$495.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful dark plum colored glass bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled simply Glass Bowl and dating from the 1920s to 30s. Attesting to its early origins, it bears the artist stamp on the base, which is rarely seen later. It is roughly 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 7 cm (just less than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493137 (stock #K080)
The Kura
$450.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful early footed bowl of colored glass with sweeping clear glass handles by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the rare original signed wooden box titled Sango-Iro Garasu Hachi (Coral Colored Glass Bowl). It is 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter, 14cm tall (5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, bearing the artist seal in gold on the base.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1940 item #1493135 (stock #K082)
The Kura
$545.00
Sale Pending
A glass Bowl by Iwata Toshichi enclosed in the very rare original signed wooden box titled Ryomimitsuki Kajutsumori (Fruit Dish with Two Handles). Inside the box lid is written: For the 2nd Emerging Glass Solo Exhibition Held at Takashimaya in the Early Summer of 1936. It is 28×24 x 8 cm (11 x 9-3/4 x 3 inches) and is in excellent condition. Acquiring a piece by Toshichi with such detail about its past is a decidedly rare opportunity.
Iwata Toshichi (1893-1980) is considered to be the founding father of Modern glass making in Japan. He graduated the Tokyo School of Fine Arts, metal-craft department, in 1918, then proceeded to garner a BA in Western (Oil) Painting in 1923 before moving to study glass under Imamura Shigezo at the Tachibana Glass Factory. He would exhibit his works with the Nitten National Exhibition both before and after the Second World War, serving as a judge there later in life. He received the Japan Art Academy Prize in 1951. In 1972 he established the Japan Glass Art and Crafts Association. He was awarded the Order of the Sacred Treasure in 1980 by the Emperor for his lifetime of devotion to the arts. Many of his works have been collected by the The National Museums of Modern Art, both Tokyo and Kyoto, and several pieces are held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1493134 (stock #K017)
The Kura
$6,500.00
Sale Pending
A breathtaking box covered entirely in gold with geese taking flight beyond blossoming plum trees overhanging the waters edge. The flowers are in red and silver, the rest of the surface is powdered gold with kirigane inlay of cut squares of gold intimating lichen and shadow on the stones. The themes are repeated on all sides of the box. Inside fans emblazoned with seasonal flowers and pine boughs decorate the Nashiji surface. The box is 29 x 24 x 16 cm (just less than 12 x 10 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a lacquered wooden storage box, dating from the later Meiji to Taisho era.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1493059 (stock #K094)
The Kura
$2,300.00
An elegant vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan retaining the original wooden base enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seika Take-no-Zu Kabin. It is 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter, 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493058 (stock #K097)
The Kura
$1,350.00
Polished layered-lacquer lozenges are inlayed into the surface of this fabulous Art-Deco era vase by important Japanese Bronze artist Yamamoto Junmin. The lacquered pieces have been cut and polished from variously colored layered lacquer. The vase is signed on the base Junmin, and measures 27.5 cm (11 inches) diameter, 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall. It is in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Junmin (1882 – 1962) learned the metal arts under Katori Hotsuma (Hozuma) and Asakura Fumio at the Tokyo University of Art. Living in Nara, the ancient capital, he was one of the finest metal workers of his age, carrying on the Edo-doki tradition through the early Showa era while also incorporating many ideas and innovations from Art Deco into hos oeuvre. His work was exhibited with the Teiten/Bunten National Exhibitions many times before the second world war, and with the Nitten National Exhibition post-war. The National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto holds two works by this important bronze artist, as well as the Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1492992 (stock #K086)
The Kura
$2,500.00
A lacquered writing box in the shape of a kimono sleeve (sode) covered in soaring silver and gold geese among autumn reeds and Togidashi clouds with a secondary (inner) sleeve shape covered in Karakusa vine tendrils on black enclosed in an age darkened kiri wood box. The inside is covered entirely in nashiji gold powder, and contains a grinding stone, and a water dropper of copper inset into the tray. Also enclosed are a bamboo brush and gilded ink stick decorated with a squirrel on a grapevine made by Koundo. The box is 22 x 15 x 3.5cm (8-1/2 x 6 x 1-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1492991 (stock #K079)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Seasonal Grasses and flowers blossom all about the cream colored surface of this slightly belted vessel by Kiyoizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gohon Akigusa Mizusashi (Water Jar with Autumn Flora on Fawn-spotted Glaze). It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 14 cm tall (just less than 5 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Paintings : Contemporary item #1492941 (stock #K098)
The Kura
$300.00
Sale Pending
An exploration of color by Nagoya based artist Hamada Juri mounted in a gold frame titled Chi no Hana (Earth Flower). The frame is 33.5 x 33.5 x 5cm, the painted disk is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, and all is in excellent condition.
Hamada Juri was born in Indonesia in 1973, and graduated the Aichi Prefectural University of Art in 1997 (The graduation art Submission was awarded ad purchased by the University). Two years later Juri graduated advanced studies at the same university, and that piece too was collected. In 2010 Juri was awarded the New artist prize by Nagoya City, and was again awarded in 2012. That same year received the Higashiyama Kai Taisho prize, and in 2013 the Aichi prefectural Culture award. Work is held in the Aichi Prefectural Museum, Hiratsuka Museum of Art, Takahashi Ryutaro collection and the aforementioned Aichi Prefectural Art University among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1940 item #1492918 (stock #K090)
The Kura
$4,900.00
A beautifully crafted basket by Tanabe Chikuunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hirokuchi Senshu-ami Hanakago (Wide Mouthed Senshu-weave Basket). It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 35 cm (14 inches) tall and retains the original bamboo insert. A similar basket is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1492917 (stock #K089)
The Kura
$650.00
A set of five lacquer lined covered bowls made from natural gourds enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Hyo Suimono Wan indicating they are for serving thin soup to cleanse the palate between courses. In Japanese cuisine, presentation is everything. Texture and color may in fact be more important than flavor. The dishes used as well, should be a feast for the eyes, and you will find every aspect of the traditional meal is presented in its own unique setting. These bowls are 7 to 8.5 cm (roughly 3 inches plus) diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and all are in excellent condition. According to Arigatojapan, Suimono, literally meaning 'dish to sip,' is a refreshing type of clear soup that is meant to cleanse the palate in between dishes. Often very light and slightly umami in taste, it is one of the oldest and most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #1492916 (stock #K024)
The Kura
$320.00
A late 19th to early 20th century bottle, properly titled, I would say, Inbe Ito-me Heso Tokkuri or Bizen Thread textured Dimpled Bottle. A seal impressed into the base is partly illegible, but the characters Bizen-Inbe are clearly visible on the right, with the character tokoro (Place) bottom center and a name ending in Ro on the left. The vessel is 27 cm tall and in excellent condition. That size would make an excellent vase.
Also known as Ningyo Tokkuri, this type of bottle is usually dimpled on three sides with an image of one of the lucky gods, Ebisu, Daikoku, Hotei or Jurojin in one of the dimples. They have been popular since at least the 17th century.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1492876 (stock #K083)
The Kura
$700.00
Pink, purple and red glazes mingle on the surface of this Mizusashi water jar by Matsuyama Gae enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kujaku-yu Mizusashi and signed inside the lid by the Urasenke Konnichi-an Grand Tea Master, Sen Genshitsu. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Gae I Returned from China in 1945, where he had been posted for eight years and had studied in depth ancient Chinese ceramics. In 1947 he opened his own kiln and immediately won acclaim, as well as the Mayors award for Kobe in 1948. Working together with his wife they developed this glaze through trial and error in 1951. Several pieces were collected by the Imperial Household agency in 1953 and 1954, and a vase was sent as a gift to then President Eisenhower in 1960. During this time they received many awards and presented at a great many exhibitions. Gae died in 1963 of cancer, and after one year of mourning, Tsutako continued the name and work. She continued to exhibit and was again accepted into the Imperial collection in 1964, and was also featured at the World Exposition in 1970 held in Osaka. When she passes away her daughter continued the family tradition, becoming the third and last Matsuyama Gae. Sen Genshitsu was born in Kyoto on April 19, 1923, as the first son of the 14th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Mugensai. His given name was Masaoki. He served as Urasenke Iemoto for thirty-eight years, up to the end of 2002, when he transferred the title and the hereditary name Soshitsu that goes with it to his eldest son, Zabosai. At that time, he changed his own name from Soshitsu to Genshitsu, and he became referred to by the title Daisosho, signifying his status as the once grand master. After serving as a pilot in the Airforce division of the Japanese navy during WWII, and then completing his temporarily interrupted university education at Doshisha University, Kyoto, graduating from the Faculty of Economics, he took Buddhist vows under Goto Zuigan, chief abbot of Daitokuji temple, and received the Buddhist names Hounsai Genshu Soko. In 1950, he was confirmed as heir apparent of Mugensai, and thus became referred to by the title Wakasosho. He made his first trip abroad that year, to Hawaii and the USA, and since then he has made more than three hundred trips abroad and been to more than sixty countries. He lived in Hawaii in 1952, during which time he lectured at and also took courses at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, beginning his long and dedicated association with that university. Upon Mugensai’s death in 1964, he succeeded as the 15th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Hounsai. He is widely known as a global-minded promoter both of the culture embraced by the Way of Tea and of World Peace. Among his many awards and recognitions, in 1997, he was awarded the Order of Culture by the Emperor of Japan.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1492828 (stock #K069)
The Kura
$1,575.00
A fabulous large porcelain vase by Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppoo) complete with a rosewood base enclosed in the original signed and compartmentalized wooden box titled Konko-yu Semi Monkizami Kabin (Golden Yellow Glazed Vase inscribed with Cicada Patterns). The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The baluster form rises to frets in the shape of stylized cicada under a belt of archaic figures and yotsu-domoe (yin-yang) symbols. It is 21 cm (just more than 8 inches) diameter 36.5 cm (14-3/4 inches) tall plus the base and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492827 (stock #K068)
The Kura
$1,250.00
A large porcelain vase by) Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppo) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yellow Porcelain Lightning Pattern Vase. The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The simplified form rises to a row of alternating concentric lines known as Lightning pattern. It is 21 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter 25 cm (10 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492756 (stock #K062)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Grain rises majestically on the surface of this pale vase by pioneering female potter Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mugi-mon Hanaire. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1492703 (stock #K088)
The Kura
$1,650.00
An image of the white robed Kannon (Quanyin), Goddess of Mercy, by Mashimizu Zoroku dating from the early 20th century. Exquisitely crafted, The figure is 14.5 x 12 x 21.5 cm (5-3/4 x 4-3/4 x 8-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kannon, also known as Guan-yin in Chinese or Avalokitasvara is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Generally shown as feminine or androgynous, she is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon.
Mashimizu Zoroku I ((Shimizu Tasaburo, 1822-1877) studied under his uncle Wake Kite and established his independent studio in 1843, taking the name Mashimizu Zoroku. He became independent in 1843 working along with Sen Soshitsu XI. His work was exhibited at the Vienna international exposition in 1873 and Philadelphia in 1876. Zoroku II (Jutaro,1861-1936) was born in the Gojo-zaka Pottery district of Kyoto and inherited the pottery tradition of his father, and, after his early death, continued under the guidance of his mother Chika, taking the name Zoroku in 1882. He was awarded at the Kyoto Kangyo Hakurankai Exposition. He colluded with some of the greatest artist of the day in reviving lost Japanese traditions such as Koyama Fujio and Arakawa Toyozo as well as being heavily involved in research into continental styles. He was a well regarded member of the city’s literatus, and is remembered for both his pottery and paintings in the Nanga tradition,
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1492680 (stock #K072)
The Kura
$2,700.00
A small Shigaraki pottery urn of very rough clay dating from the 16th century covered in thin natural ash glaze. The squat form known as Uzukumaru is very popular for its simplicity in Japanese Tea Aesthetics. About the shoulder is a lattice fence design engraved into the earth, otherwise it is unadorned and very humble. It is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter, roughly the same height enclosed in an ancient wooden storage box. There is an old age-darkened chip to the rim, otherwise is in surprisingly condition,
Appreciation of ancient Shigaraki pottery encapsulates a profound appreciation for imperfection, transience, and simplicity. Wabi-sabi cherishes the beauty found in the imperfect, the weathered, and the natural, fostering a sense of humility and acceptance. This philosophy values authenticity over artificial perfection, encouraging a deeper connection with nature and the passage of time. Similarly, the Japanese tea aesthetic, rooted in the tea ceremony's ritualistic practices, emphasizes harmony, respect, and tranquility. Together, they invite individuals to embrace the fleeting moments of life, finding solace and serenity in the subtle beauty of the everyday.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1492679 (stock #K070)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large figure of the Daruma in celadon glaze by Teishitsu Gigei-in Suwa Sozan I set on to a rosewood stand and enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The beautifully carved face and feet are in raw, burnt clay, the rest is entirely robed in pale green. It is 18.5 x 16.5 x 36cm (7-1/4 x 6-1/2 x 14 inches) plus the stand and is in excellent condition, signed inside with his koban shaped oval seal.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1492677 (stock #K064)
The Kura
$950.00
A pair of masks representing the two variations of Tengu, the long nosed Tengu and the Karasu (Crow) Tengu mounted on a wooden placard dating from the Meiji period. Each mask is of carved and lacquered wood with inset glass eyes. The placard is 38cm (15 inches) wide 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and the masks are roughly 11 cm (4 inches plus) in depth. It looks as if the Karasu Tengu mask has had the eyes repaired, and they appear cloudy by comparison to those of the the long nosed partner.
The long-nosed and or Beaked Tengu is a mythical creature from Japanese folklore. Tengu are believed to be supernatural beings often depicted with human and bird-like features. They're known for their long noses, which can vary in length depending on the depiction. Tengu are often associated with mountain forests and are considered protectors of the mountains. They are known for their mischievous nature, martial arts prowess, and sometimes for teaching humans valuable lessons or skills. In Japanese culture, Tengu are a fascinating blend of reverence and fear, embodying both the spiritual and the natural worlds.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1492641 (stock #K051)
The Kura
$2,100.00
The bird-faced Kami (god) Doryo Daigongen strikes a powerful pose astride the back of a mischievous white fox. Doryo is purported to have been an ascetic monk who turned himself into a Tengu when he vowed on his deathbed to protect the Mountain Temple Complex of Daiyuzen in modern day Kanagawa prefecture. This legend inspired a cult which rose to great prominence in the Edo period. To this cult the figure was the ward of Budo (martial arts). Originally this figure would have had feathered wings, which have been lost to time, and it is likely the soot encrusted figure was also once adorned in color and the fox was white, but that too has been all buried beneath centuries of soot from incense smoke. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall. There is some damage to his right hand, tip of the beak and foxes tail.
Tengu are mountain and forest goblins with both Shinto and Buddhist attributes. The patron of martial arts, the bird-like Tengu is a skilled warrior and mischief maker, especially prone to playing tricks on arrogant and vainglorious men, and to punishing those who willfully misuse knowledge and authority to gain fame or position. In Buddhist lore they came to be protectors of temples and defenders of the Dharma (Buddhist Law).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1492640 (stock #K053)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully formed earthen flask from the Bizen region, the fire-buffed side still gleaming softly while opposite it has absorbed time into the porous clay. It comes enclosed in a box titled Ko Bizen Kaijo Ko-Tokkuri, inside the lid is annotated the dimensions and the dating Momoyama Jidai no Saku (Made in the Momoyama period) signed by the great Bizen connoisseur Katsura Matasaburo. It is 6.5 cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 13.5 cm (5-1/4 inches) tall and in overall fine condition.
Bizen boasts a rich cultural heritage as one of the Rokkoyo (six ancient kilns), originating in Okayama Prefecture, with a history spanning over a thousand years. Its traditional wood-fired kiln process imparts unique characteristics, resulting in earthy tones, rough textures, and distinctive natural ash glazes, prized for their rustic beauty and individuality. Moreover, Bizen ware embodies the ethos of wabi-sabi, celebrating imperfections and simplicity, resonating with collectors who appreciate the aesthetic of rustic charm and natural authenticity. Its timeless elegance and connection to Japanese tea ceremony culture further enhance its allure among pottery enthusiasts, making Bizen pottery a coveted addition to any collection.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492597 (stock #Z086)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A skeleton sits among the dried grasses, alone and forgotten, perhaps reflecting on his life in this earie painting by Buddhist priest Higuchi Ryuon dated Meiji 6 (1873). Ink on paper, it is 41.5 x 179.5 cm (16-1/4 x 70-1/2 inches) and is in fine condition; completely remounted in a border of two subtle shades of black with colorful piping and features black lacquered rollers with mother of pearl flakes. It comes in a kiri-wood box.
Higuchi Ryuon (1800-1885) was a priest of the Jodo sect of Buddhism active from the later Edo through the Meiji periods. Born in Aizu (modern day Fukushima) he studied at the Higashi Honganji Takakura Gakuryo and served at Onjoji in Omi (modern day Shiga Prefecture) as well as Chishakkuin in Kyoto before becoming head priest of Enkoji Temple in Kyoto. He has recently come to attention when it was discovered he had a copy of the Bible in his personal effects.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492596 (stock #K071B)
The Kura
$350.00
A set of three spouted nesting bowls decorated in the traditional Mugiwara pattern of alternating stripes of russet red, pale blue and orange emanating like rays from the center. The larger bowl is 9.5 cm (just under 4 inches) diameter, 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall. The smallest is roughly 7.5 diameter, 4.5 cm tall and all 3 are in excellent condition, enclosed in an old kiri-wood box.
This traditional pattern is called ``Mugiwarade'' because its vertical stripes resemble ears of wheat. It has three colored lines: green, red, and indigo and can be used regardless of the season. This pattern of regularly drawn lines was often used on utensils for daily use such as tea bowls, choko cups, and katakuchi cups. It is believed that they were made throughout Seto, including Shinano and Akatsu, from the late Edo period. Onita, which produces a brown color, is alternately painted with a paint called ``Akaraku,'' which produces a red or orange color, and Gosu, which produces an indigo color. You can see thick lines of red or indigo drawn with not just one, but two or even three thin brown lines between them. Drawing these lines at equal intervals and overlapping the lines thinly at the center (orientation) of the inside of the bowl or plate is one of the highlights of the craftsman's skill.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492595 (stock #K071A)
The Kura
$280.00
Sale Pending
A set of 8 small dishes dating from the later 19th century known as Mame-zara (bean plates) covered in cream colored crackled glaze decorated in the traditional Mugiwarade pattern of alternating stripes of russet red, pale blue and orange emanating like rays from the center. Each plate is roughly 8.5 diameter and all are in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern, black-lacquered wooden box.
This traditional pattern is called ``Mugiwarade'' because its vertical stripes resemble ears of wheat. It has three colored lines: green, red, and indigo and can be used regardless of the season. This pattern of regularly drawn lines was often used on utensils for daily use such as tea bowls, choko cups, and katakuchi cups. It is believed that they were made throughout Seto, including Shinano and Akatsu, from the late Edo period. Onita, which produces a brown color, is alternately painted with a paint called ``Akaraku,'' which produces a red or orange color, and Gosu, which produces an indigo color. You can see thick lines of red or indigo drawn with not just one, but two or even three thin brown lines between them. Drawing these lines at equal intervals and overlapping the lines thinly at the center (orientation) of the inside of the bowl or plate is one of the highlights of the craftsman's skill.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492594 (stock #Z084)
The Kura
$1,650.00
A Dojin licking Dango-treats dances in erratic dashes of soft wet lines and swift dark strokes of flying white on this vertical presentation by Edo period eccentric Doi Goga. Ink on paper it is 43 x 184.5 cm (17 x 72-1/2 inches) and has been completely remounted in dark silk with bone rollers. The creature clutches the raku-in stamp in his upper hand, the other stamps seem to follow his feet like footsteps. It comes enclosed in an age darkened wooden box. Known as the “Mad monk” Goga had a unique spontaneity to his work which was fresh and yet hearkened back to art of the great Zen masters. Of Doga Rhiannon Paget wrote “Characteristic of Goga's works are blunt, velvety black brushstrokes bleeding into the surrounding paper, exaggerated incidences of “flying white” (the streaking effect caused by a dry brush), paler strokes conveying depth, and perhaps most curiously, the incorporation of his seals into the pictorial space. This playful device was used sometimes in Japanese woodblock prints, but is rarely seen in painting”. Doi Goga (1818-1880) was a Confucian scholar of the late Edo to Meiji periods. He was born the son of a doctor serving the lords of Ise (modern Mie prefecture), home of the gods and Ise Shrine. A child prodigy, he studied under Ishikawa Chikugai and Saito Setsudo. The early death of his father saw him succeed the family head at the age of 12. He would serve later as a teacher in the official government school. He held strong opinions and was very critical of the hypocrisy and corruption he saw in military government and in Confucianism itself. His works began to see the light of day in the early Meiji period, however due to their inflammatory nature, much was left unpublished until after his death. Known for paintings of bamboo and landscapes, his Dojin figures are rare and highly sought.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1492549 (stock #Z093)
The Kura
$1,000.00
A ghost rises from the darkness pulling on her hair, a wry grin as she looks sideways at the viewer on this antique painting by Moriwaki Unkei. Ink on paper completely cleaned and remounted in vine patterned blue silk with dark wood rollers. There are old age stains on the paper, which appear much stronger in the photos than in life. It is 40 x 200 cm (15-3/4 x 78-3/4 inches) and in excellent condition.
Moriwaki Unkei (1858-1946) was born in Tanakura-cho, Kawaetsu-han (Fukushima prefecture), in the final years of the Edo period. He studied Nanga, literati painting, then moved to Tokyo in 1899 where he helped found the Nihon Nansoga-kai painting organization. His works were shown at the Naikoku Hakurankai and Bunten National Exhibitions among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492548 (stock #Z094)
The Kura
$950.00
Long verses fall like rain upon the sinister figure of an Oni (type of devil) dressed in the habit of a priest who glares as he walks through the village, banging out a warning to all evil-doers. Around his neck hangs a bell which he clangs loudly with the hammer held high in one hand. The stern figure carries in the other hand a booklet titled Hogacho. A Hogacho is a record of the name and quantity of persons who donated (hoga) for projects such as the construction and repair of temples or shrines and the publication of scriptures. In the case of the Oni, his Hogacho records the sins and misdeeds of humans for payment in the after world. On his back is an umbrella. Ink on paper in a simple brown cloth border with highlights of Kinran gold in the Ichimonji above and below with dark lacquered wooden rollers like the shift of a priest moving to reveal the regal robes beneath. It is 39.7 x 179 cm (15-1/2 x 70-1/2 inches) and has been completely cleaned and remounted.
The Oni, often depicted as hulking, fearsome creatures with horns, sharp claws, and a menacing appearance, are a prominent feature in Japanese folklore, Buddhist lore, and broader Japanese culture. Their role and representation have evolved over time, encompassing a range of meanings and functions across different contexts.
In folklore, Oni are typically portrayed as malevolent spirits or demons representing chaos, destruction, and malevolence. They are often depicted as ogre-like beings with red or blue skin, wild hair, and tusks. They are known to cause mischief, bring calamities, and even consume human flesh. Oni are common antagonists in folktales, serving as the embodiment of evil and chaos. However, Oni can also have more nuanced roles. In some stories, they are not purely evil but rather more complex characters with a potential for redemption. Thus in Buddhist tradition, Oni take on additional layers of symbolism. They are often seen as the enforcers in hell (Jigoku), punishing the wicked for their sins. In this context, Oni are agents of karmic retribution, ensuring that sinners face the consequences of their actions. This role reinforces the moral lessons of Buddhism, emphasizing the importance of virtuous behavior to avoid suffering in the afterlife. Sometimes the concept of Oni in Buddhism is more metaphorical, representing inner demons or the obstacles one must overcome on the path to enlightenment. They symbolize inner struggles with the vices and negative emotions such as anger, greed, and ignorance that hinder spiritual progress.
In contemporary Japanese culture, Oni have become more multifaceted. They appear in various media, including literature, art, film, and video games, often with different interpretations. While they still retain their traditional fearsome attributes, they are sometimes depicted in a more humorous or sympathetic light. For example, the Oni character in the popular manga and anime "Dragon Ball" is portrayed as a bureaucratic worker in the afterlife, adding a humorous twist to their traditional role. They also feature prominently in cultural festivals such as Setsubun, celebrated on February 3rd during which people perform rituals to drive away evil spirits. One common practice is the throwing of roasted soybeans (mamemaki) while chanting "Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi" ("Oni out, good fortune in"), which is meant to cleanse the home and welcome good luck.
The enduring presence and adaptability of the Oni in Japanese culture underscore their significance as both a reflection of societal values and a versatile symbol in the collective imagination.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492517 (stock #Z095)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A deliciously horrifying painting of a ghost rising from the empty field dating from the 19th century completely remounted and ready to go for another century of leering from the shadows. Ink on paper with highlights of gofun and red pigment separated from a field of blue by a single narrow strand of red and gold Kinran silk terminating in dark wood rollers. The artist has sealed the panting with two crimson chops in the lower corner. The scroll is 42.7 x 196 cm (16-3/4 x 77 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, completely remounted.
For the Japanese Kaidan-banashi, or ghost stories, are a summer tradition. It is said that the telling of a ghost tale at night will cause the temperature in the room to fall, a great necessity during those boiling summer evenings. The ghosts and their associated skeletons have also long been subject in Buddhist art, with the emphasis on the brief nature of our lives in comparison to the cosmic void.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Contemporary item #1492480 (stock #K065)
The Kura
$750.00
A Fine modernist vase by master of the Japanese bronze tradition, world renowned Hasuda Shugoro, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seido Tsubo, Shajiku (Pure Bronze Vase, Hub). The contemporary belted form is finished with matte olive patination. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 19 cm (just under 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The box is dated on the side an auspicious day in the 4th month of Heisei 8 (1996).
Hasuda Shugoro was born in Kanazawa City in 1915. After graduating the Ishikawa Prefectural Industrial School, he moved to the Tokyo School of Art. Much lauded his first award was at the 5th Nitten in 1949 and he received the Hokuto-sho there in 1953 among many further prizes. He participated in the founding of the Creative Crafts Association in 1961 and founded the Japan Metal Sculpture Institute in 1976. Decorated with the Order of Cultural Merit in 1991, Hasuda Shugoro stands as one of the leading modernist artists working in bronze during the Post-War Period. A vase by the artist sold at Christies in 2012 for 2,500 pounds (roughly 4,000 dollars). For more on this artist see Hasuda Shugoro Kinzoku Zokei (1981).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1990 item #1492453 (stock #K066)
The Kura
$800.00
A cocoon shaped basket of tight weave with bamboo insert made for wall hanging by Maeda Chikubosai II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kake Kaki (Hanging Flower Receptacle). It is roughly 16 cm (6 plus inches) diameter, 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Maeda Chikubosai II (1917-2003), was born when his father, Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was already quite mature. Initially he studied plaiting techniques from younger artists in the family studio, and once mastered studied under his father, and Yamamoto Chikuryosai I (Shoen), becoming an independent artist in 1941 and succeeding to the Chikubosai name in 1950. He was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition in 1953, and exhibited there consistently as well as in the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten). He was honored by the Japanese government in 1992, and was named a Living National Treasure for the bamboo crafts in 1995. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1492443 (stock #Z092)
The Kura
$1,700.00
Love lasts beyond the grave, here a skeleton walks, her pate decorated with flowers and a bundle of daisies in her hand as she strolls grinning under the shade of a dilapidated umbrella held by an attendant, a poignant painting signed Shoken dating from the Taisho period (1922). The four character verse above is taken from the Lotus sutra (Hanya-Shingyo) and reads shikisokuzeku, meaning (loosely) all color is void, the void is all color. Completely restored in a chic Tsumugi cloth border with black lacquered wooden rollers, the scroll is 59 x 192 cm (23-1/2 x 75-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.