The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1488700 (stock #OC017)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A handle surmounts the peak of this beautifully rendered vase by Myagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Sometsuke Te-oke-gata Kabin (Celadon Handled Bucket Shaped Vase with Blue and White Design). It is 16 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32.5 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1488614
The Kura
sold, thank you
An unusual Edo period Oribe serving bowl, the color filled crackled glaze decorated with scrolling lines in iron and splashes of copper green. Both inside and out hash mars denote a bamboo fence with blossoms in the fore. A handle and raised architectural elements around the rim and rising to the mouth echo some western influence, possibly indicating original Christian use. It comes resting on a silk pillow in a age-blackened wooden box titled Oribe Katakuchi. The piece measure 24.5 x 13.5 x 10 cm (10 x 5-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
On a little historical note, a toned paper label on one side denotes the piece was once placed under hold by the Himeji Courthouse as part of a property with a lean against it, indicating the piece was considered to be of significant value even a century ago.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1488519
The Kura
$1,700.00
Plums blossom red on the dark surface of this traditionally shaped Mizusashi bearing the rare Ubagamochi Stamp impressed into the clay of the base. It is 18 cm diameter, 15 cm tall, and comes in an old custom made collectors kiri-wood box labeled Ubagamochi Mimitsuki Mizusashi. It retains the original ceramic lid, as well as two lacquered lids, one a tsukuibuta lid in austere black, the other redish brown outside, gold within, featuring a raised image of a dragon flying through billowing clouds circling mount Fuji.
Ubagamochi is a rice cake popular in Kusatsu in Omi Province (modern Kusatsu City, Shiga Prefecture) and Ubagamochiyaki is a pottery made there. Legend has it that the owner of the Ubagamochi Chaya in this area founded a kiln in the mid 18th century.. originally making plates upon which to serve the famous Ubagamochi cakes, it expanded to tea ware purportedly under the 8th head of the family Segawa Kuniyoshi, who was a dedicated tea practitioner and close with the lords of Omi and Zeze Castle (which had its own pottery). This lasted through the 10th head of the family Kanazawa Kocho, who was also a fervent follower of tea. Unique Carved Hand Wooden Sculpture by Makino Koen Yay or Nay, stop or go, all good or hang on a second… .an intriguing wooden sculpture by Makino Koen of Niigata prefecture, a two sided hand carved from Japanese hardwood, one side gesturing with all fingers extended, the other joining the thumb and forefinger in an OK sign. It is 37 x 23 x 38 cm and in excellent condition, signed beneath.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488518
The Kura
$1,200.00
A beautifully carved tray of overlapping leaves interspersed with clustered grapes by Ichikawa Shudo signed on back in a circular cartouche. In one corner an odd round tail leads us to a squirrel head popping through the leaves, as if one were looking up through the vines toward the sky. It is 46 x 35 x 3 cm (roughly 18 x 14 x 1 inches) and is in overall fine condition, There is a slight warp to the bottom of the tray, but it is still bery usable and there is no damage to the carving. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1488404
The Kura
sold, thank you
Two Jubako stacking porcelain boxes enclosed in their unique wooden boxes which are both enclosed together in an additional outer wooden box for protection. According to the lid, the designs were by Kinoshita Itsuun and Uragami Gyokudo, and the pieces were made by Kawamoto Hansuke. Hansuke is considered the progenitor of porcelain production in Seto, and it was through an act of industrial espionage that he was able to bring the techniques, until then the secrets of the Kyushu potteries, to Seto. It is believed the 3rd generation Hansuke went to Kyushu, purportedly to help with the establishment of the Kameyama Kiln, and stole the secrets of porcelain production. Each set of boxes is roughly 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) square, 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) tall and enclosed in respective age-darkened wooden boxes. The landscape dominated pieces are in excellent condition, the boxes with floral designs have several small chips and one gold repair. The box for the landscape piece is titled Ju-bachi Hakurendo and has inside two long verses stating the paintings was performed by Gyokudo. The box for the second piece is signed inside Shintoen Hansuke-zo, the name used by the 4th generation Hansuke.
During the Horeki era (1751-1764), the first generation Kawamoto Hansuke worked with Kawamoto Jihei to build both the Asahi and Yuhi kilns, and each subsequent generation inherited the name Hansuke. The third generation switched to Sometsuke-yaki in 1804. His son, the fourth generation, took over the family business in 1822. He created a variety of Shozui-style dyed patterns and was a naturally talented artist, inheriting his father's legacy, and was always passionate about improving porcelain. 'In the Tenpo era, he finally invented the idea of pulverizing Gyaman stone and blending it with the original clay creating a lustrous, tranparent porcelain. During the Tenpo era (1830-1844), he was ranked as the Bishu family's pottery master. He is remembered as a person who made a significant contribution to the history of Seto's ceramic industry for his research into the use of silica stone as a glaze on porcelain to increase transparency and improve the color of Gosu, and for his efforts to improve quality.In 1858 (Ansei 5), he adopted Kawamoto Masukichi as his eldest daughter's son-in-law and passed the family business to him as the fifth generation.
Kameyama ware was made in Nagasaki during the late Edo period. The high-quality white porcelain is famous for its literati-style Gosu paintings reminiscent of imported Chinese models, but many designs evoke an exotic atmosphere unique to Nagasaki. A characteristic of Gosu is that it is darker overall than Imari. Under the Nagasaki Magistrate, the techniques of potters in each domain were handed down from generation to generation, producing highly skilled porcelain such as Mikawachi ware from the Hirado domain, Hasami ware from the Omura domain, and Arita ware from the Saga domain. In 1807, a kiln was opened in Kakineyama, Irabayashi, Nagasaki by 4 potters with funds by a loan from the Nagasaki Magistrate's Office, the kiln named Kameyama. The clay was taken from Amakusa, Ajiro as well as imported clay from Suzhou in China. Prominent literary figures such as Tanomura Chikuden, Kinoshita Itsuun, Somon Tetsuo, and Miura Gomon, designed elegant literati paintings for the pottery decoration. By 1819, it was run solely by Jingohei Ogami, and during the Kansei and Tenpo years it reached its peak, gaining reputation for its high quality. In 1839, Jingohei Ogami passed away at the age of 65, and the second generation, Jingohei, took over the kiln, which remained in operation until 1865. Because the pottery was produced over a short period of about 50 years, and there are few passed down items, it is called a phantom pottery, and particularly well-crafted pieces are prized by collectors.
Kinoshita Itsuun (1800 - 1866) was a nanga during the latter part of the Edo period. born as the third son of Kinoshite Katsushige in Nagasaki. At the age of 17 he inherited the role of "Otona," or village head, which had been assumed by the Kinoshita family for generations, but transferred the role to his elder brother in 1829. Working as a medical doctor, which had been his initial interest, he was committed to proliferation of vaccination learned from a Dutch medical doctor. Itsuun first learned Nanga painting from Ishizaki Yushi, as well as directly under several Chinese artists visiting Nagasaki. He ardently studied the techniques of various painting schools including Unkoku, the Kano School, Yamato-e and the Maruyama Shijo School as well as Western oil painting and incorporated them into his own technique. He tavelled in literati circles with the likes of Rai Sanyo, Tanomura Chikuden, Somon Tetsuo and Hirose Tanso. He also excelled in other fields such as calligraphy, tenkoku (seal-engra
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1488230
The Kura
sold, thank you
Phoenix soar among golden clouds on this amazing Lacquer box made for holding a Tsuzumi drum by Miura Meiho (1900-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Houn Maki-e Tuzumi Bako. It is bound with silk chord which is held to the box with solid silver hardware. Inside it is lined with brocade. The box is 30.5 x 24 x 24.5 cm (12 x 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches) an is in perfect condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1800 item #1487897
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of 5 rare Dutch glass cups imported to Japan in the Edo period and formerly owned by the Confucian scholar Nakai Riken (1732-1817). They are enclosed in a custom made double sided wooden box with drop in doors titled on the side Yoi-O-Gozui (Five fortuitous ways to be drunken) with a long verse carved into each door. Of course, the meaning of the title goes much deeper, and the Gozui is also a Confucian concept. The emperor of China distributed five jade treasures to the five feudal lords, and they were named. The scholar has named each of the cups after one of these jade objects, Ko, Yu, Haku, Shi and Dan. The Osaka University Professor Ueda Minoru researched Riken, and mentions the treasured set of five glass cups, the smallest with a golden rim, in his research of the scholars life and belongings, claiming them to be one of his most treasured items. The largest cup is 15 cm tall, the smallest 7.5 cm. There are some chips and fractures in the corners of the seven-sided foot of the smallest cup, otherwise all is in overall excellent condition.
Nakai Riken (1732-1817) was a Confucian scholar of the later Edo period. He studied Neo-Confucianism under Goi Ranshu, and together with his older brother Nakai Chikuzan, supported Kaitokudo, a school of learning in Osaka, leaving behind the greatest academic achievements of the Kaitokudo school. the rational and modern academic style that is characteristic of Kaitokudo literati was established mainly by Riken. As a scholar he commented on the classics and wrote books such as " Nanakyo Kadai," and "Shichikyo Kadai Ryaku." These were compiled into a total of thirty-three volumesara. He was well versed not only in economics but also in natural sciences such as astronomy. Goryu Asada, who had studied Western astronomy in earnest, stayed with. He wrote an overview of the ming period book "Tenkyo Arumon," by Yushiroku, and created a celestial map. In addition to astronomy, he also left a natural history map "Sakura Cho", an anatomical chart "Etsuryofutsu", and a microscope observation record "Microscopic Record". In addition, he wrote "Kashokoku Monogatari" (The Tale of Kashokoku), in which the protagonist was the king of a fictitious ideal nation, 'Kashokoku,' and discussed how the nation should be governed. A prolific writer, he left a vast body of contextual research for subsequent generations.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487857
The Kura
$3,500.00
Sale Pending
A radical Bizen Mizusashi with two lacquered wooden lids enclosed in a black lacquered wooden box with gold lacquer writing titled Samidare which is in turn enclosed in a kiri-wood storage box by the same title compartmentalized to allow the lids to be stored safely. Samidare is a poetic reading for Rain of the Fifth Month (June in the traditional calendar). It has a seal of overlapping rings impressed into the earth of the base, and dates from the Edo period. The lids are for differing events, one black lacquered, the other covered with gorgeous gold and silver maki-e clouds with a soaring nightingale in gold, inside the ghost of a crescent moon. The Vessel itself is crusted with ash and dribbles of ocher with kutsuki on the side where something adhered to it in the firing. Inside the trials of the artist fingers are clearly visible. The receptacle is 23 x 20 x 15 cm (9 x 8 x 6 inches) ad is in overall excellent original condition. A very impressive presentation. Inside the Kiri box is written that the piece was viewed by The honorable Mr. Inoue upon his visit in Meiji 45 (1912). Inside the black lacquered lid is a paper tablet which reads Matsue-jo Nushi Fumaiko Hakogaki (Box written by Fumaiko of Matsue Castle).
Among the successive lords of the Matsue domain was the 7th lord of the Matsudaira family, famous tea master and Zen acolyte Harusato Matsudaira (1751-1818). He is known by many people simply as Fumai, the name he took after shaving his head in retirement in 1806. At the age of 17 he became the lord of the fief; the domain was in dire financial trouble. Harusato appointed Goho Asahi Tanba as chief retainer and promoted a fiscal reconstruction plan. While making great efforts to reduce expenditures, such as reducing debts within the domain and reviewing the domain's personnel structure, they also sought to increase income through industrial promotion measures such as the cultivation of medicinal ginseng and wax. He succeeded in restoring the domain's prosperity. After rebuilding the domain's finances, he focused his efforts on collecting tea utensils that had been scattered one after another from feudal lords of the time. The collected items were later called ``Unshu specialties,'' and are highly valued by lovers of tea ceremony and art. Harusato's great achievement in the history of the tea ceremony was his 18-volume book, in which he further classified famous tea utensils. He also promoted arts and crafts within the Matsue domain, supporting many craftsmen in the worlds of pottery, lacquer, and woodwork.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487734
The Kura
sold, thank you
A spectacular collapsed pottery jar from the Karatsu tradition with a purpose-warped wooden lid covered in powdered silver enclosed in a top quality ancient red-lacquered kiri-wood box lined with wave-patterned colored-paper. The ancient box has silver lacquer writing on the top reading Kodai Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Ki, Mizusashi (Ancient Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Period, Mizusashi). The pot is 17 cm (7 inches) diameter, 15 cm (6 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1487733
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous porcelain incense burner in the shape of a boy playing the flute astride a large ox dating from the 19th century. The box identifies the work as Hirado ware. The quality is certainly of that level. It is 23.5 x 12 x 19 and is in perfect condition, enclosed in a period red-lacquered wooden box.
In Zen, an oxherd searching for his lost ox has served as a parable for a practitioner’s pursuit of enlightenment since this Buddhist sect’s early history in China. In the eleventh century, the Song-dynasty Zen master Guoan Shiyuan codified the parable into ten verses. The parable proceeds from the herd boy losing his ox and following its tracks to recover the animal to transcending this world. This piece represents the sixth step in enlightenment, riding the bull home. This is the point where one has attained understanding. The ancient verse associated with this image reads:
Mounting the bull, slowly
I return homeward.
The voice of my flute intones
through the evening.
Measuring with hand-beats
the pulsating harmony,
I direct the endless rhythm.
Whoever hears this melody
will join me.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1487710 (stock #OC019)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Reaching for his hat, the boatman leans out arms extended toward the prow, protected from the elements under a woven reed roof. This beautiful incense burner comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 x 8 x 10 cm (9-1/2 x 3-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
sold, thank you
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487575
The Kura
$900.00
A lovely chawan made of three separate excavated shards connected by lines of gold dating from the Kamakura to early Muromachi periods (13th to 14th centuries). It is 15.7 cm diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an old wooden box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487535
The Kura
$450.00
Rich green glaze covers this elongated delicate undulating bottle from the Kosugi-yaki tradition of the Kaga region near modern day Kanazawa city. This bottle is roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kosugi ware is a type of pottery that was produced in Kosugi Town over four generations for about 80 years, from around the early Bunka era (1810-1820) to the Meiji 20s (around 1890). In the hilly area south of Imizu City that connects Ikeda, Hirano, Ueno, and Hashimotojo, pottery was made in the Kofun period, Nara period, and Heian period, even before Kosugi ware began. This is probably because this area was rich in high-quality clay, which was the raw material for pottery, and red pine trees, which were used as fuel. From the first Yoemon to the fourth generation, pottery production was actively carried out in the former Kosugi Town (hereinafter referred to as Kosugi Town). The first generation Yoemon (given name Yoichiro) traveled throughout the land and mastered the technique of Soma ware (Fukushima prefecture), before returning to his hometown at the age of 30 to open a kiln. Kosugi ware rapidly spread its fame, and in the Tenpo era, it received a pottery license from the Kaga domain, and with the support of the county magistrate, reached its peak. The first Yoemon passed away in August 1838. The second generation Yoemon (young name Yojuro) took over at the age of 30. Many of the first-generation sake bottles were somewhat small, with a wonderful sculptural sense, and the green glaze had a beautiful color and luster that was slightly bright.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1487484
The Kura
SOLD
A carved wood figure of a wandering priest, robes billowing in the wind, his large straw hat full of holes, signed Yasuchika on the back. Dating from the late Edo to Meiji period, it is by a member of the Tsuchiya Yasuchika lineage. The figure is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, complete with walking stick.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487331
The Kura
$2,500.00
A shard has been grafted into the side of this large misshapen Shino bottle dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period, the repair lined with gold. Gold also circle the neck where the discarded misfire was repaired, and gleams on the lip. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an age darkened wooden box titled Ko-Shino Tokkuri, Shoki no Kama (Old Shino Tokkuri, early Kiln era)
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. It is said that this technique was used as a sign of reconciliation between two warring factions during the Sengoku Period, the era of warfare surrounding the 1500s. It was common for the leaders of these factions to hold tea ceremonies with each other to negotiate peace. It is said that, when the negotiations were successful, yobitsugi was used to combine the tea sets used at the meeting where peace was decided.