The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1457860 (stock #TCR8323)
The Kura
$4,500.00
A tripod censer in white porcelain with solid silver lid by Seifu Yohei IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taihakuji Kaminarimon Teigata Koro. It is 17 cm (6-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, signed between the legs Seifu. The box has a separate compartment for the lid.
Seifū Yohei IV (Seizan: 1872-1946) was born the second son of Seifū Yohei III (1851-1914). He studied literati-style painting under Tanomura Shōsai (1845-1909), a son of Tanomura Chokunyū, in Osaka for three years. In 1914, he succeeded to the head of the family and produced works mostly in his father’s style. He won a number of prizes including the Golden Prize at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco in 1916 and the exhibitions of the Japan Art Association in 1916 and 1918. He produced several works for members of the Imperial family.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1457488 (stock #TCR8317)
The Kura
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A vivacious crystalline glazed vase by Seifu Yohei IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gishi-yu Kessho-mon Kabin Vase with Purple Crystal Pattern Glaze). With the bold color and striking natural patterns it has quite a lot of presence. The vessel is 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter, 23 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Seifū Yohei IV (Seizan: 1872-1946) was born the second son of Seifū Yohei III (1851-1914). He studied literati-style painting under Tanomura Shōsai (1845-1909), a son of Tanomura Chokunyū, in Osaka for three years. In 1914, he succeeded to the head of the family and produced works mostly in his father’s style. He won a number of prizes including the Golden Prize at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco in 1916 and the exhibitions of the Japan Art Association in 1916 and 1918. He produced several works for members of the Imperial family.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1457333 (stock #TCR8315)
The Kura
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Intense cobalt blue describes a cornucopia of natures beauty about the outside of this large bowl by Seifu Yohei II, while inside scholars and sages wander through a bucolic lakeside landscape dotted with pavilions. Birds flit among the trees on the raucous scene, with a rabbit and symbols of fortune hidden among the foliage. The large bowl is slightly oblong, 21-23 cm diameter, 11 cm tall and in excellent condition. There are some firing flaws about the base ring (as visible in the photographs), no damage.
Seifu Yohei I (1803-1861) founded the Seifu dynasty in Kyoto. He was born in powerful Kaga-kuni, modern day Kanazawa prefecture. After apprenticing with the second generation Dohachi, he established his own kiln in the Gojo-zaka pottery district of Kyoto. Seifu Yohei II (1844-1878) took over that world upon his father’s death and continued to elevate the family name. His work was presented at the Philadelphia Worlds Fair in 1876, that piece was purchased at the time by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. He held the reigns for only a short time, and died at the very young age of 34, leaving the kiln to brother in law, who would hurl the name of Seifu onto the annals of history recording the highest qualities of world porcelain artistry. For more on this illustrious lineage see the book Seifu Yohei by Seki Kazuo (2012).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1457279 (stock #TCR8309)
The Kura
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A small vase based on the traditional Chinese Gu-form by Seifu Yohei IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Rokan-yu -shiki Kabin. Originally a bronze form, the choice of deep green Rokan-yu glaze is perfectly suiting. It is 19.5 cm (roughly 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Seifū Yohei IV (Seizan: 1872-1946) was born the second son of Seifū Yohei III (1851-1914). He studied literati-style painting under Tanomura Shōsai (1845-1909), a son of Tanomura Chokunyū, in Osaka for three years. In 1914, he succeeded to the head of the family and produced works mostly in his father’s style. He won a number of prizes including the Golden Prize at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco in 1916 and the exhibitions of the Japan Art Association in 1916 and 1918. He produced several works for members of the Imperial family.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1457181 (stock #TCR8302)
The Kura
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Two Sometsuke tea containers decorated with scholarly scenes and lengthy calligraphic prose by Seifu Yohei I enclosed in a double wood box (ni-ju-bako) annotated by the fourth generation Seifu. They are 6.5 cm square, 13 cm tall. One has a some damage to the inner rim, a chip in the lid and a nick in the glaze of the bottom corner. Repairs can be performed at cost if desired
Seifu Yohei I (1803-1861) founded the Seifu dynasty in Kyoto. He was born in powerful Kaga-kuni, modern day Kanazawa prefecture. After apprenticing with the second generation Dohachi, he established his own kiln in the Gojo-zaka pottery district of Kyoto. Seifu Yohei II (1844-1878) took over that world upon his father’s death and continued to elevate the family name. His work was presented at the Philadelphia Worlds Fair in 1876, that piece was purchased at the time by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. He held the reigns for only a short time, and died at the very young age of 34, leaving the kiln to brother in law, who would hurl the name of Seifu onto the annals of history recording the highest qualities of world porcelain artistry. For more on this illustrious lineage see the book Seifu Yohei by Seki Kazuo (2012). Seifu Yohei I (1803-1861) founded the Seifu dynasty in Kyoto. He was born in powerful Kaga-kuni, modern day Kanazawa prefecture. After apprenticing with the second generation Dohachi, he established his own kiln in the Gojo-zaka pottery district of Kyoto. Seifu Yohei II (1844-1878) took over that world upon his father’s death and continued to elevate the family name. His work was presented at the Philadelphia Worlds Fair in 1876, that piece was purchased at the time by the Victoria & Albert Museum in London. He held the reigns for only a short time, and died at the very young age of 34, leaving the kiln to brother in law, who would hurl the name of Seifu onto the annals of history recording the highest qualities of world porcelain artistry. For more on this illustrious lineage see the book Seifu Yohei by Seki Kazuo (2012).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1457099 (stock #TCR8300)
The Kura
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A Pigeon rests contentedly in the crook of a tree, feathers puffed up, one leg retracted; a rare sculpture by Seifu Yohei IV enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled GishiJi Hato Okimono (Purple Glazed Porcelain Pigeon Figurine). It is 15 x 16 x 18 cm (roughly 6 x 6-1/2 x 7 inches) and in excellent condition.
Seifū Yohei IV (Seizan: 1872-1946) was born the second son of Seifū Yohei III (1851-1914). He studied literati-style painting under Tanomura Shōsai (1845-1909), a son of Tanomura Chokunyū, in Osaka for three years. In 1914, he succeeded to the head of the family and produced works mostly in his father’s style. He won a number of prizes including the Golden Prize at the Panama Pacific International Exposition, San Francisco in 1916 and the exhibitions of the Japan Art Association in 1916 and 1918. He produced several works for members of the Imperial family.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1457057 (stock #TCR8299)
The Kura
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Scholars wander the misty landscape dotted with pavilions on the outside of this deep bowl by Seifu Yohei III enclosed in the original signed wooden box bearing the Teishitsu Gigein seal of the Imperial Art. The style of the signature is consistent with turn of the century works. It is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Seifu Yohei III (1851-1914) was the adopted son of Yohei II. Sent at the age of twelve to study painting under then the top Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu, he returned in 1865 due to illness. The next year he entered as an apprentice the Seifu studio, then under the control of the second generation. As so often happens in these situations, in 1872 he married the daughter, becoming a “Yoji” or adopted son of Yohei II and taking the family name, established himself as an individual artist. Within the year his genius was discovered, and works by him were sent to the Vienna World Exposition. Seifu II retires of illness in 1878, and III succeeds the family kiln. Once again he is honored as the new head of the kiln to produce the dinnerware for the former president of the US Ulysses Grant. His work was highly acclaimed, both domestically and abroad, drawing honors and prizes at the Naikoku Hakurankai (National Exhibition), Chicago and Paris World expositions and being named one of the first members of the Imperial Art Academy specializing in ceramics in 1893 (Tei shitsu Gigei In). Works by this rare artist are held in Museums and collections throughout the world. He was succeeded by the fourth generation Seifu (1871-1951) in 1914.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1456952 (stock #TCR8297)
The Kura
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A set of four ghostly pale sake flasks by Seifu Yohei III dating from the late 19th century enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taihakuji-bin. The pieces are unadorned but for a band containing flower-like suns. Each is roughly 15 cm tall and in excellent condition. They retain three of the four original wrapping cloths.
Seifu Yohei III (1851-1914) was the adopted son of Yohei II. Sent at the age of twelve to study painting under then the top Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu, he returned in 1865 due to illness. The next year he entered as an apprentice the Seifu studio, then under the control of the second generation. As so often happens in these situations, in 1872 he married the daughter, becoming a “Yoji” or adopted son of Yohei II and taking the family name, established himself as an individual artist. Within the year his genius was discovered, and works by him were sent to the Vienna World Exposition. Seifu II retires of illness in 1878, and III succeeds the family kiln. Once again he is honored as the new head of the kiln to produce the dinnerware for the former president of the US Ulysses Grant. His work was highly acclaimed, both domestically and abroad, drawing honors and prizes at the Naikoku Hakurankai (National Exhibition), Chicago and Paris World expositions and being named one of the first members of the Imperial Art Academy specializing in ceramics in 1893 (Tei shitsu Gigei In). Works by this rare artist are held in Museums and collections throughout the world. He was succeeded by the fourth generation Seifu (1871-1951) in 1914.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1456894 (stock #TCR8293)
The Kura
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An unusually large vase by Seifu Yohei III with carved cloud designs covered in mottled red flambe glaze. The box is titled Dawn-cloud-glazed Vase, Made by the former Seizan (alternate name used by Seifu III) dated Late in the Year of the Earth-Horse in the Taisho era (1918), attested to by the 4th generation Seifu. He has employed the Teishitsu Gigei-in seal of the third generation on the lid. There is a large, broad repair to the foot in colored lacquer, so it is likely the vase was never offered for sale, but perhaps given to someone or held in the family collection. The expanse of the repair to the base indicates the running glaze likely adhered to the kiln floor or tiles and broke when being removed. Seifu III was known to have made few large works, so this is a very important piece. It is signed on the base Dai-Nippon Seifu Zo. It is 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) diameter, 41 cm (16 inches) tall.
Seifu Yohei III (1851-1914) was the adopted son of Yohei II. Sent at the age of twelve to study painting under then the top Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu, he returned in 1865 due to illness. The next year he entered as an apprentice the Seifu studio, then under the control of the second generation. As so often happens in these situations, in 1872 he married the daughter, becoming a “Yoji” or adopted son of Yohei II and taking the family name, established himself as an individual artist. Within the year his genius was discovered, and works by him were sent to the Vienna World Exposition. Seifu II retires of illness in 1878, and III succeeds the family kiln. Once again he is honored as the new head of the kiln to produce the dinnerware for the former president of the US Ulysses Grant. His work was highly acclaimed, both domestically and abroad, drawing honors and prizes at the Naikoku Hakurankai (National Exhibition), Chicago and Paris World expositions and being named one of the first members of the Imperial Art Academy specializing in ceramics in 1893 (Tei shitsu Gigei In). Works by this rare artist are held in Museums and collections throughout the world. He was succeeded by the fourth generation Seifu (1871-1951) in 1914.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1456023 (stock #TCR8292)
The Kura
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A young girl, her hair loosely bound, drifts off into a fond memory with a smile as she brushes a letter, the reem of paper draped from her left hand, the bamboo brush idle in her right. Incredible detail from the Kinkozan Kiln in Kyoto stamped on the pale clay of the base. It is 18 cm (7 inches) long, roughly the same height and in excellent condition. Better known for Kyo-satsuma style pottery works, this is a rarity.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1900 item #1455780 (stock #TCR8287)
The Kura
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A pale glazed Kyo-yaki ceramic figurine of a rabbit by Takahashi Dohachi III decorated across the back with a poem by the poet-nun Otagaki Rengetsu. The poem reads:
Usagira ga Rabbits
gamanoho-iro no kegoromo wa Fur robes the color of cattails...
kamiyo nagara ni ki kae zaru ran. Remain un-changed since the age of Gods.
This was crafted by a professional potter, the brushwork by Rengetsu, much crisper than normal thanks to the smooth surface and higher grade materials at teh Dohachi Kiln. Signed on the rump: 77 year old Rengetsu, the figure bearing the stamp of Takahashi Dohachi III on the base. It is roughly 19 x 13 x 19 cm (7-1/2 x 5 x 7-1/2 inches). There is a chip in the tip of the right ear, otherwise is in excellent original condition.
Otagaki Rengetsu was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I. Following the early death of his older brother he succeeded the family name, opening a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles. Along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. An exhibition was held at the Suntory Museum in 2014 centering on this artist, and he is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among many, many others. The third generation (1811-1879) was known as Kachutei Dohachi and continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the annals of Kyoto ceramics. He was followed by the fourth generation (1845-1897), and his sons Takahashi Dohachi V (1845-1897) who took control of the kiln in 1897 until 1915 when his younger brother Dohachi VI (Kachutei) (1881-1941) continued the business.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1455733 (stock #TCR8286)
The Kura
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This little guy is just about the cutest thing I have ever seen. A tiny mouse rests atop a bulging white radish, bristling blue leaves in full detail attached as if pulled fresh from the ground. Dating from the 19th century (later Edo to early Meiji period), it comes enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Daikon Nezumi Futamono (Radish/Mouse Lidded Receptacle). I confess in over 25 years dealing in Japanese art and antiques I have never seen one like it. It is in excellent condition. Unlike in the west, the mouse is viewed as a symbol of fortune, as mice only gather in homes where there is an abundance of food. The Daikon radish as well, is a symbol of fortune as it grows rapidly. If someone does not scream Kawaii I will not be able to take it!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1454963 (stock #TCR8273)
The Kura
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An unusual pottery vase of raw earth decorated with huddled white Sagi (Crested Ibis) beyond a berm of iron by Miyagawa Kozan bearing the artists seal on the base. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 15.5 cm (6-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1454748 (stock #MBR8270)
The Kura
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A wispy bearded sage clutches his staff, robes draped loosely about his emaciated frame as he peers ahead in interest, a curious smile on his wizened visage. The figure is beautifully crafted with a slightly textured patina and signed on the base Seiko. Slight wear to the base reveals the pure gold of the underlying bronze. It is 36.5 cm (14-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1454671 (stock #MOR8269)
The Kura
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An intricately woven Karamono basket in unusual Hishigata (Diamond Shape) by Noguchi Ushu enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The handle is a single long architectural element of split bamboo which rises from the tapering diamond frame. Ornate tightly woven knots decorate the peak. The basket is 28 x 20 x 48 cm (11 x 8 x 19 inches) and is in excellent condition. It is branded on the base Ushu. A strikingly similar work is held in the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, although I believe the piece offered here has better knotting (please check for yourself).
Noguchi Ushu was born in Kusatsu City, Shiga prefecture on the shores of lake Biwa just north of Kyoto in 1947, third generation in a family of traditional bamboo artists. He learned bamboo craft from his father and grandfather, with an emphasis on Chinese knotting and design. He was awarded at the 18th Bamboo Craft Exhibition held in Kyoto, and his work has been exhibited in many of Japan’s top venues.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1454140 (stock #TCR8262)
The Kura
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Flowers of the four seasons blossom in a cacophony of color over the entirety of this Kutani vase signed from the pre-eminent Kaburaki (Kaburagi) studio dating from the opening of the 20th century. The imagery is exquisitely performed with over-glaze enamels on a sheer white ground. The vase is large at 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition, with some wear to the gold rim. It comes enclosed in an old custom made kiri-wood box.
Kaburaki, along with Yoshidaya, were the preeminent studios producing Kutani from the 19th to early 20th century. Kutani-yaki originated in a village called Kutani in Ishikawa Prefecture in the 17th century and was revived in Kanazawa in the early 19th century by the ruling Maeda family. It was in 1822 that Jisuke Kaburaki opened the very first kutani pottery shop. Over the years Kaburaki Kutani products gained a reputation for excellence both at home and abroad. Today the eighth generation of the family, Motoyoshi Kaburaki, continues this family business.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1454001 (stock #TCR8261)
The Kura
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An image of the sleeping Shojo (sake Sprite) by the 12th generation Sakaida Kakiemon enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taihaku Shojo Bori Okimono. The ordinarily playful figure is performed in pure white, a serene look upon his sleeping face creating an almost holy feeling, the ladle fallen at his knee, leaning against a barrel of sake, the empty jar the only color. The image is 31 x 21 x 16 cm (12 x 8 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition. Sakaida Kakiemon (1878-1963) was born the first son of the 11th generation head of the Sakaida family, and learned from his father, succeeding the family name in 1917. Rediscovering the Nigoshide technique was his life’s research, and together with his son grasped the essentials in 1947, presenting the first piece for public viewing in 1953. The Nigoshide technique was subsequently named an important cultural property, and the Kakiemon family designated the carriers of the tradition. Held in the collection of The Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art, Seattle Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1453884 (stock #MOR4818)
The Kura
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A silver rabbit and large solid bronze figure of the young god O-kuninushi no Mikado by Oshima Joun on a black lacquered stand enclosed in the original signed and red lacquered wooden box with separate compartments for the table and figure. Here we see O-kuninushi seated beside his bundle of belongings, hand extended in benevolence to the meek creature. The box is titled O-kuninushi Go-Zo, Go Okimono, Tobu Oshimia Joun Sakku followed by a ka-o signature. Inside is written the characters SoNeKo(Shi)ShakuDen(Tono). The inscription infers some Imperial event at which this was given (The character Shaku is the same as the UjinoShaku Imperial visit held after New years when commoners who have excelled in the previous year are granted an audience with the Emperor). There are two patches of fresh lacquer inside the lid, indicating a name and possible date of the recipient have been erased. The bronze figure is 8-1/2 inches (22 cm) tall and weighs 4.5 kg (9-1/2 lbs). The rabbit is solid silver, 28 grams. Both are in fine condition.
I believe the story tells of a young god Onamuji (who would become O-kuninushi) and eight of his fellows who left Izumo seeking the hand of princess Yakami of Inaba. He being the youngest and kindest of the group, was left to carry the baggage. As the men reached the coast, they found a rabbit stripped of fur and bleeding. So as a prank they told him to wash in the sea and dry himself in the sun. Of course this caused the rabbit much pain, until Onamuji arrived (delayed with the heavy bags), and told the hare to wash himself in the clean rivers of the stream and roll in the billowing seeds of the cat-tails. The rabbit quickly recovered, and made a prediction to the lad that indeed Yakami would fall in love with him above all others despite his appearing as a servant.
Oddly the story does not end there, and one must pity the princess, for the other men kill Onamuji (several times and he is several times revived) and he is forced to flee to the underworld, where he falls in love with King Susano’s daughter and elopes with her. The grand Shrine at Izumo, one of the oldest and most important in Japan, is dedicated to Okuninushi, and he is believed to be the builder of nations.