The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491426 (stock #N05)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A river runs past deeply forested hills populated by rooftops in this naïve ink painting reflecting the charm of rural Japan by Shirakura Niho. Ink on paper mounted in a green cloth border extended with beige featuring Shunkei nuri lacquered wooden rollers which would instantly call to mind the mountain village of Takayama, home of the Shunkei style. It is 52.5 x 116.5 cm (20-1/2 x 46 inches) and comes in the original signed wooden box titled Satoyama Fukei (Mountain Village Scenery).
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491781 (stock #N12)
The Kura
$850.00
A sparse image of tiny boats, sails stretched with wind floating out off the coast by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Enko Hobari (Sails Stretched in the Distant Harbor). Pigment on silk bordered in patterned cloth extended in beige. The scroll is 65.5 x 132.5 cm (25-3/4 x 52 inches). There is some toning to the silk typical of age, but is in overall fine condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Contemporary item #1492480 (stock #K065)
The Kura
$750.00
A Fine modernist vase by master of the Japanese bronze tradition, world renowned Hasuda Shugoro, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seido Tsubo, Shajiku (Pure Bronze Vase, Hub). The contemporary belted form is finished with matte olive patination. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 19 cm (just under 8 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The box is dated on the side an auspicious day in the 4th month of Heisei 8 (1996).
Hasuda Shugoro was born in Kanazawa City in 1915. After graduating the Ishikawa Prefectural Industrial School, he moved to the Tokyo School of Art. Much lauded his first award was at the 5th Nitten in 1949 and he received the Hokuto-sho there in 1953 among many further prizes. He participated in the founding of the Creative Crafts Association in 1961 and founded the Japan Metal Sculpture Institute in 1976. Decorated with the Order of Cultural Merit in 1991, Hasuda Shugoro stands as one of the leading modernist artists working in bronze during the Post-War Period. A vase by the artist sold at Christies in 2012 for 2,500 pounds (roughly 4,000 dollars). For more on this artist see Hasuda Shugoro Kinzoku Zokei (1981).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1493650 (stock #K093)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of five sake cups, each engraved with a unique poem by the artist/nun Otagaki Rengetsu dating from her 83rd year enclosed in an antique Sarasa cloth pouch with silk pads between enclosed in an old wooden box. They are each 5 cm (2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. The poems read:
1 Wakabae no yanagi no ito no mijikaku te furiwakegami no kokochi koso sure
The newborn willow fronds are short and feel to me just like bobbed hair
2 Umazake no miwa no sugi zu ba kore zo kono oi zu shina zu no kusuri nara mashi
Fine sake in balance becomes an elixir for perpetual youth and long life
3 Asakaze ni ubara kaori te hototogisu naku ya uzuki no shiga no yamasato
On the morning breeze the scent of rambler roses...a cuckoo cries crossing Uzuki over Shiga Mountain Villages
4 Kawazoi no yanagi no ito ni kakari keri nokoru koori no kataware no tsuki
In the willow fronds along the riverbank caught like lingering ice—a half moon
5 Tanazoko wo uke te matsu ma mo chiyo ya hen nome ba wakayu to kiku no shitatsuyu
In my palms waiting for eons to pass...I hear drinking this will make me younger—the chrysanthemums' hanging dew
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1800 item #1487897
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of 5 rare Dutch glass cups imported to Japan in the Edo period and formerly owned by the Confucian scholar Nakai Riken (1732-1817). They are enclosed in a custom made double sided wooden box with drop in doors titled on the side Yoi-O-Gozui (Five fortuitous ways to be drunken) with a long verse carved into each door. Of course, the meaning of the title goes much deeper, and the Gozui is also a Confucian concept. The emperor of China distributed five jade treasures to the five feudal lords, and they were named. The scholar has named each of the cups after one of these jade objects, Ko, Yu, Haku, Shi and Dan. The Osaka University Professor Ueda Minoru researched Riken, and mentions the treasured set of five glass cups, the smallest with a golden rim, in his research of the scholars life and belongings, claiming them to be one of his most treasured items. The largest cup is 15 cm tall, the smallest 7.5 cm. There are some chips and fractures in the corners of the seven-sided foot of the smallest cup, otherwise all is in overall excellent condition.
Nakai Riken (1732-1817) was a Confucian scholar of the later Edo period. He studied Neo-Confucianism under Goi Ranshu, and together with his older brother Nakai Chikuzan, supported Kaitokudo, a school of learning in Osaka, leaving behind the greatest academic achievements of the Kaitokudo school. the rational and modern academic style that is characteristic of Kaitokudo literati was established mainly by Riken. As a scholar he commented on the classics and wrote books such as " Nanakyo Kadai," and "Shichikyo Kadai Ryaku." These were compiled into a total of thirty-three volumesara. He was well versed not only in economics but also in natural sciences such as astronomy. Goryu Asada, who had studied Western astronomy in earnest, stayed with. He wrote an overview of the ming period book "Tenkyo Arumon," by Yushiroku, and created a celestial map. In addition to astronomy, he also left a natural history map "Sakura Cho", an anatomical chart "Etsuryofutsu", and a microscope observation record "Microscopic Record". In addition, he wrote "Kashokoku Monogatari" (The Tale of Kashokoku), in which the protagonist was the king of a fictitious ideal nation, 'Kashokoku,' and discussed how the nation should be governed. A prolific writer, he left a vast body of contextual research for subsequent generations.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1494356 (stock #K401)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A wild design of three small bean shaped boxes enclosed in a dynamic long bean pod decorated with colored lacquer and mother of pear inlay by Nagai Yasuo. The outer box is 43 × 12 × 7.8 cm (17 inches long), the beans themselves are 9.5 × 6.5 × 5 cm (roughly 4 x 2-1/2 x 2 inches) and all is in excellent condition. These are made in the Kanshitsu or dry lacquer technique, whereby cloth is covered in layers of lacquer allowing for free form shapes limited only by the imagination. Nagai Yasuo was born in Aichi prefecture in 1945, and graduated the Takamatsu School of Crafts lacquer department in 1964, receiving top prize for his work. He began exhibiting with the Nihon Craft Ten (National Crafts Exhibition) in 1981, and three years running from 1981-1983 his work was featured in solo exhibitions at the Aichi Prefectural Museum. From 1983 he expanded to exhibit with the progressive Asahi Craft Exhibition. He earned gold at the 1989Takaoka Craft Competition. Nagai states: I consider "items for and inspiration from daily life" as the premise for my creations. From there, I explore the freedom of form achievable through kanshitsu.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489298 (stock #L122)
The Kura
$650.00
Water streams between the verdant hills on this lurid landscape by 20th century artist Shimizu Hian. Ink on paper completely remounted in silk with black lacquer rollers. The poem reads: Hana chirite Arui ha, Samuki hi mo arinu, Haru no Yukue no shizuka nari keru (Early flowers have fallen and the cold lingers, nonetheless Spring quietly approaches). It is 63 x 129 cm (25 x 51 inches) and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491939 (stock #N18)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A lonely figure walks home through the forested hills, a rustic scene by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) from his mature period distinctly blending his early years of training in watercolor under Ishii Hakutei with his later Nanga years. Ink and light color on silk in a superb silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It comes in the original signed double wood box titled Kisho (returning home) and is in excellent condition. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1492124 (stock #K036)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A hand formed silver vase with lacquered insert attached to a wooden base dating from the Art-deco era. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition. There is a small impression in the wood base, roughly 1 cm long, on one side. An accompanying card from the Nakano Zenkuro shop of Osaka has a simple 4 digit telephone number. Japan's influence on Art Deco was profound, shaping the movement's aesthetic vocabulary and contributing to its evolution as a global design phenomenon. Conversely, Art Deco left its mark on Japan, inspiring Japanese artists and designers to create innovative works that blended Western modernity with traditional Japanese craftsmanship, resulting in the distinctive style of Japanese Art Deco. The Japonisme movement of the late 19th century had already sparked Western fascination with Japanese art, culture, and design, paving the way for Japanese motifs and aesthetics to permeate international artistic trends, including Art Deco. One of the key influences on Art Deco was the emphasis on simplicity, asymmetry, and geometric patterns. Japanese woodblock prints, showcased bold graphic compositions and stylized representations of nature, which resonated with Art Deco's penchant for streamlined forms and dynamic imagery. Furthermore, the Japanese concept of "ma" or negative space, which emphasizes the importance of empty space in composition, had an impact on Art Deco's approach to spatial arrangement and balance.
Conversely, Art Deco also influenced Japanese art and design, particularly during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and the early Showa period (1926-1945). As Japan embraced modernization and Westernization, Art Deco became fashionable among Japanese artists, architects, and designers who sought to merge Western aesthetics with traditional Japanese sensibilities. Architects like Sakakura Yasui and designers like Shima Seien embraced Art Deco principles in their works, incorporating sleek lines, geometric patterns, and luxurious materials into their designs for buildings, furniture, textiles, and decorative objects. Moreover, the international exhibitions of the Art Deco era provided Japanese artists and designers with opportunities to showcase their work on the global stage, further disseminating Japanese Art Deco influences worldwide. Japanese lacquer-ware, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork adorned with Art Deco motifs became highly sought after by collectors and aficionados around the world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489793
The Kura
$2,800.00
An unprecedented 19th century ceramic sculpture of a tumble of Shishi lions in a playful fight covered in unusual green-blue glaze. The Banko mark is impressed into the white clay of the base. It is very unusual to find large sculptures or works in Banko ware. This is 30 × 25 x 26.5 cm (12 x 10 x 10-1/2 inches) and in excellent condition. It comes in a box titled Okimono Banko-yaki Gyoku (Jade?) Shishi, with an inscription inside stating it was named a famous piece of the Shrine in July of 1920.
Banko ware began in the mid Edo period with the establishment of a small kiln in Kuwanocho, Mie prefecture, by the merchant, potter and Tea aficionado Nunami Rozan who stamped his works with his store name Banko. He studied in Kyoto and other regional kilns and created a name for himself in tea circles. The pottery died with Rozan, however was revived in the late Edo period specializing in Sencha tea ware and earthenware eating utensils.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1477328
The Kura
sold, thank you
Thick molten ash drivels over the shoulder of this fabulous 17th century Shigaraki Tsubo storage jar showing all the great attributes of Shigaraki ware. It has a large open ware (pronounced wa-ray) crack down the front, which does not go through to the inside, and the fire blasted front surface is shot with fine heat cracks. A large Kutsuki to the lower let shows where it adhered to something else in the kiln during the firing. Natural ash glaze in yellow and green slides down over the surface forming shiny green drips opposite raw earth burnt red studded with Shiseke feldspathic stones. On the foot are two supporting Geta. It is 31 cm tall, nd in overall excellent condition, with one colored repair to the mouth (see photos).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1491100 (stock #K007)
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A crusty wood fired Bizen dish with looping handle, one hemisphere rounded, the other pinched as if for pouring, dating from the Edo period enclosed in an ancient custom fit lacquered Kiri-wood box. It is 23.5 x 22cm x 12.5 cm (roughly 9 inches diameter, 5 inches tall) and is in surprisingly excellent overall condition, with a few nicks to the edge of the foot consistent with age. Evidencing the centuries, there is a loss near the handle to some thicker glaze encrustation. This only happens with Bizen after a great deal of time. A dish like this would have been used for serving sweets in a tea room, or perhaps some skewered grilled fish in a traditional meal. The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The firing process allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Simplicity of form enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1487733
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous porcelain incense burner in the shape of a boy playing the flute astride a large ox dating from the 19th century. The box identifies the work as Hirado ware. The quality is certainly of that level. It is 23.5 x 12 x 19 and is in perfect condition, enclosed in a period red-lacquered wooden box.
In Zen, an oxherd searching for his lost ox has served as a parable for a practitioner’s pursuit of enlightenment since this Buddhist sect’s early history in China. In the eleventh century, the Song-dynasty Zen master Guoan Shiyuan codified the parable into ten verses. The parable proceeds from the herd boy losing his ox and following its tracks to recover the animal to transcending this world. This piece represents the sixth step in enlightenment, riding the bull home. This is the point where one has attained understanding. The ancient verse associated with this image reads:
Mounting the bull, slowly
I return homeward.
The voice of my flute intones
through the evening.
Measuring with hand-beats
the pulsating harmony,
I direct the endless rhythm.
Whoever hears this melody
will join me.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1473331 (stock #OC051)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A striking Peacock feather colored flambe glazed vase by Leading Kyoto Potter Uno Ninmatsu enclosed in a signed wooden box dated the 10th month of Showa 5 (October 1930). It is 28 cm tall and in excellent condition.
Uno Ninmatsu (1864-1937) was born in Kyoto son of potter Wada Sohei and studied under his father as well as from a young age Seifu Yohei II then future Imperial Art Academy artist Seifu Yohei III until setting up his own studio at the age of 21. Outgoing by comparison to the normal Kyoto ideal, he promoted Kyoto art and culture and actively sought to invigorate the export market (then dominated by Tokyo and Yokohama). He won a bronze medal at the Paris world exposition in 1901, and gold medal at the St. Louis Exposition in 1904, Belgium in 1905 and Milan the following year. Unlike other potters in Kyoto at this time, he did not overly decorate his works, but concentrated on matte glazes and form in austere glaze techniques. This proved very popular, and from the turn of the century his works were highly sought in the United States. He also worked closely with designers in France, where many of his works were exported. Following the first world war, he retired to the domestic market. He was deeply involved in silk road pottery research and mastered Shinsha (flambe glazes) as well as Turkish Blue and other styles not yet produced at that time in Kyoto. He was father and mentor to Uno Soyo and Uno Sango, and served as mentor to the young Isamu Noguchi.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469664 (stock #OC071)
The Kura
sold, thank you
One of the most unusual pieces I have ever seen from this innovative artist, an octopus shaped Koro by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in seal of the Imperial Art Academy. The bulbous top of the head is removable along a line as if the creature were wearing a hachimaki head band, revealing the incense chamber within. It is 26.5 cm (10-1/2 inches) tall, 19.5 cm (roughly 8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489792
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large lozenge shaped bowl of thick clay covered in fawn spotted glaze by Kiyomizu Rokubei V decorated with a poem by Hashimoto Kansetsu enclosed in the original wooden box signed by both artists titled Gohon Fuseikei Hachi (Bowl of irregular shape in Gohon glaze. It is quite large, 34×26.5㎝ x 15cm (13-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Hashimoto Kansetsu (1883–1945) was born in Kobe, son of painter Hashimoto Kaikan from whom he gained a love of Chinese culture. He studied at Chikujokai under Takeuchi Seiho (1864-1942), but eventually withdrew due to differences of opinion. He visited Europe in 1921 and after that spent part of almost every year in China. Many of his paintings were inspired by Chinese scenery or Chinese classical literature. His former residence in Kyoto is now a museum of his work called the Hakusasonso.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1474626
The Kura
sold, thank you
A black bird sporting a tufted beak shelters among the thick foliage of fresh bamboo by the easily identifiable and quite rare artist Sakakibara Shiho performed with pigment on silk in the original signed double wood box titled Mosochiku Hakkacho (Crested Myna Bird in Moso Bamboo), a favorite motif by the artist dating from the Taisho period. It is bordered in fine pattered silk threaded with gold and is appointed with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). A major work, the scroll is 55.5 x 222.5 cm (inches) and in overall fine condition.
Sakakibara Shiho (1887 – 1971) was born in Kyoto and studied traditional Japanese painting at the Kyoto City School of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1907, then moved on to the Kyoto Municipal School of Painting (mod University of Art). While at the school, his works were accepted (1909) and awarded (1911) into the Bunten National Exhibition. He graduated there in 1913. With his radical style garnering disapproval in official circles, in 1918, along with Tsuchida Bakusen, Irie Hakko, Ono Chikkyo and Murakami Kagaku founded the Kokuga Sosaku Kyokai. The organization changed its name to the Kokugakai in 1928, the same year Shiho took a position at his alma mater where he was awarded a professorship in 1937. He was awarded for his life’s work by the Nihon Geijutsu-in (Japan Art Academy) in 1962. Happily, the Kokuga-kai has outlived its founders, and is still exhibiting annually to this day. Works are held in the collections of the Seattle Art Museum, The Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art, the Adachi Museum as well as the Otani memorial Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1494168 (stock #K403)
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A standing lion covered in running yellow bamboo ash glaze from the Edo period kilns of Takatori on the southern Isle of Kyushu. Head held high, the smoke would vent straight out of the creatures mouth, as if exhaling the fragrant tendrils. It is 14 x 10.5 x 20 cm and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern kiri-wood storage box.
Takatori-yaki, is a traditional style of Japanese pottery that originated in the early 17th century. It was developed in the town of Takatori (mod. Fukuoka Prefecture). Takatori-yaki is renowned for its unique and distinctive aesthetic, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy tones and running glaze. The history of Takatori pottery dates back to the beginning of the Edo period (1603-1868) when a Korean potter named Yi Sam-pyeong, also known as Ri Sampei in Japanese, settled in the area. Yi Sam-pyeong had been brought to Japan by the powerful daimyo (feudal lord) Hosokawa Tadaoki, who ruled over the Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture). Tadaoki was fascinated by Korean pottery and invited skilled potters from Korea to establish kilns in Japan, with Yi Sam-pyeong being one of them. Under the patronage of the Hosokawa family, Yi Sam-pyeong and his descendants established the Takatori kilns in the town of Takatori. Initially, the kilns produced pottery influenced by Korean styles, particularly the Buncheong and Ido wares. However, over time, they developed their own distinct style, blending Korean techniques with Japanese aesthetics. Takatori was highly prized by tea masters and samurai lords who appreciated its rustic charm and humble beauty. Takatori-yaki became an integral part of the tea ceremony culture, as its earthy tones and natural glazes were considered suitable for the serene and rustic atmosphere of tea houses.
Shishi guardians, also known as Komainu or "lion dogs," have a long history in Japanese art and culture; iconic figures often depicted in pairs and placed at the entrances of shrines, temples, and other important structures to ward off evil spirits and protect against negative energies. The origins of the Shishi can be found in ancient Chinese culture, specifically the mythical creature known as the "shi" or "foo dog" in English. These creatures were believed to have protective qualities and were commonly depicted in Chinese art and architecture. As Buddhism spread to Japan from China in the 6th century, so too did the imagery of the lion guardians. The artistic representation of Shishi lion guardians in Japan evolved into a unique style. The sculptures typically depict a pair of lion-like creatures with fierce expressions, large manes, and muscular bodies. One lion has an open mouth to represent the sound "ah," which is believed to expel negative energy, while the other has a closed mouth to represent the sound "um," which is believed to retain positive energy. This duality symbolizes the balance between yin and yang, and the harmony between opposing forces.