The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1491782 (stock #N13-16)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of four large scrolls depicting seasonal landscapes by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed double wood box exhibited at the 1936 Nangain-Ten and published in the book Shirakura Niho (page 127 figures 102-107). Ink & Light color on Paper in fine silk mountings, they have been completely cleaned and restored to original perfect condition retaining the original cloth by Kitaoka Hyboido of Kyoto. Each scroll is 66 x 138.5 cm (26 x 54-1/2 inches). A copy of the museum book and our catalog will accompany the set.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #1477865
The Kura
sold, thank you
An amazing small wooden figure covered in with glass eyes made in the hyper-real likeness of a Rakugo-shi Comic storyteller, dressed I traditional Hakama trousers and seated on a large cushion clutching a fan in his right hand. It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall, while the cushion upon which he sits is 19.5 x 15.5 cm (just under 8 x 6 inches) and the figure is in excellent condition. There is what appears to be a signature on the bottom; Ta?Saku. This caring is very much in the audacious style of early works by artist Hirakushi Denchu, (b. 1872) and likely dates from the first quarter of the 20th century, although could go back into the final years of the 19th.
According to Wikipedia: Rakugo (literally 'story with a fall) is a form of Japanese verbal entertainment, traditionally performed in small theatres. The lone storyteller sits on a raised platform, a kōza using only a paper fan and a small cloth as props, and without standing up from the seiza sitting position, the rakugo artist depicts a long and complicated comical (or sometimes sentimental) story. The story always involves the dialogue of two or more characters. The difference between the characters is depicted only through change in pitch, tone, and a slight turn of the head.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1492337 (stock #K013)
The Kura
$1,500.00
A fabulous cabinet covered in polished black lacquer inlayed with mother of pearl designs in the style of Nagasaki containing various boxes, trays and dishes for an outing. To allow any steam to escape, it has windows which were once lined with silk. Brass hardware secures the hinged doors which swing out with small boxes and trays in one side, a square sake bottle with brass spout encased in a wooden stand on the other. The interior works are performed in clear lacquered hardwood grains and red lacquer with gold edging. Beneath a drawer slides out from either end, for chopsticks, napkins and other serving implements. The cabinet is 26.5 x 26.5 x 30 cm (10-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 12 inches) and is in overall surprisingly good condition. There are a few minor marks and indentations in the lacquer typical of use and although it originally contained five small red octagonal trays, only four remain.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487857
The Kura
$3,500.00
Sale Pending
A radical Bizen Mizusashi with two lacquered wooden lids enclosed in a black lacquered wooden box with gold lacquer writing titled Samidare which is in turn enclosed in a kiri-wood storage box by the same title compartmentalized to allow the lids to be stored safely. Samidare is a poetic reading for Rain of the Fifth Month (June in the traditional calendar). It has a seal of overlapping rings impressed into the earth of the base, and dates from the Edo period. The lids are for differing events, one black lacquered, the other covered with gorgeous gold and silver maki-e clouds with a soaring nightingale in gold, inside the ghost of a crescent moon. The Vessel itself is crusted with ash and dribbles of ocher with kutsuki on the side where something adhered to it in the firing. Inside the trials of the artist fingers are clearly visible. The receptacle is 23 x 20 x 15 cm (9 x 8 x 6 inches) ad is in overall excellent original condition. A very impressive presentation. Inside the Kiri box is written that the piece was viewed by The honorable Mr. Inoue upon his visit in Meiji 45 (1912). Inside the black lacquered lid is a paper tablet which reads Matsue-jo Nushi Fumaiko Hakogaki (Box written by Fumaiko of Matsue Castle).
Among the successive lords of the Matsue domain was the 7th lord of the Matsudaira family, famous tea master and Zen acolyte Harusato Matsudaira (1751-1818). He is known by many people simply as Fumai, the name he took after shaving his head in retirement in 1806. At the age of 17 he became the lord of the fief; the domain was in dire financial trouble. Harusato appointed Goho Asahi Tanba as chief retainer and promoted a fiscal reconstruction plan. While making great efforts to reduce expenditures, such as reducing debts within the domain and reviewing the domain's personnel structure, they also sought to increase income through industrial promotion measures such as the cultivation of medicinal ginseng and wax. He succeeded in restoring the domain's prosperity. After rebuilding the domain's finances, he focused his efforts on collecting tea utensils that had been scattered one after another from feudal lords of the time. The collected items were later called ``Unshu specialties,'' and are highly valued by lovers of tea ceremony and art. Harusato's great achievement in the history of the tea ceremony was his 18-volume book, in which he further classified famous tea utensils. He also promoted arts and crafts within the Matsue domain, supporting many craftsmen in the worlds of pottery, lacquer, and woodwork.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1491937 (stock #K027)
The Kura
sold, thank you
No two faces are the same on this incredible Toyoraku ceramic stacking box covered in gold and silver Maki-e lacquer dating from the 19th century. Inside is typical Oribe style green over crackled cream colored glaze with floral designs in iron. Outside lightning strikes in silver separate the multitude of intense lattice designs in fine gold lines on black lacquer. Stacked they are 15 x 13 x 17 cm, each vessel 15 x 13 x 4.5cm tall, and in excellent condition.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469489 (stock #OC067)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exceptional Oki-goro Incense Burner in the shape of a dark glazed Catfish by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Namazu Koro dated the 6th month of Taisho 10 (1921). This would have been placed over a dish in which a burning incense cone would have been placed. It is 48 cm (18-1/2 inches) long, 23 cm (9 inches) tall and appears in excellent condition. A blacklight reveals a color repair at the base of the tail and at the position where the dorsal fin rises from the back. A similar figure can be seen in the rare 1923 book Sozan no Toki.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491692 (stock #K003)
The Kura
$2,600.00
A stellar modernist form with of cast bronze by Yamamuro Hyakusei in the form of a droplet splashing up as it hits the liquid surface. It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 34.5cm (13-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in a custom kiri-wood collector’s box and is signed on the base Hyakusei.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist born in Toyama prefecture. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491693 (stock #K004)
The Kura
$1,800.00
A second brilliant Modernist Vase by Yamamuro Hyakusei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Akatsuki (dawn). It is 24.5 cm (just les than 10 inches) diameter, 20cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist from the Showa to early Heisei eras. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1494029 (stock #K398)
The Kura
$950.00
By Naimen Shiho II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter, 27cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition. This is a great pair with the vase in the same form with silver inlay by his father.
Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji, (1904-1987) studied metalwork under Ichioka Shiun from the age of 15 establishing his own workshop in 1925. His work was first publicly exhibited at the 1930 National Shokoten. Two years later he would be awarded at the Belgium World Exposition. He remained active throughout the troubled years of the mid-century for which he would receive the order of cultural merit from Takaoka City in 1967. Work by him is held in the Takaoka City Museum. He remained an active promoter of traditional bronze ware until his death in 1987. His son, the second generation Shiho would study under his father from 1957. He too is much lauded beginning with top prize at the 1974 Takaoka Traditional Craft Exhibition
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1980 item #1482363
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite image of an emaciated man, the prominent bones about the eyes softly glowing pale white over the hollow cheeks. The mask is of the Yase-otoko type, and is signed on the back by the maker Iwasaki Hisahito in a carved seal above the eye. Superb craftsmanship!
Iwasaki Hisahito is a well known Mask carver currently 78 years old and still going. He was born in Oita prefecture, but moved to Nagoya then Yokohama at a youthful age. All processes are done by hand, from carving the wood and creating the shape, applying the gofun coating and drawing the hair with a brush then applying lacquer. “What I rely on is the memory of seeing many performances and the feeling of being struck by the many faces." He has created about 500 masks over his more than fifty year career. Having studied under a Noh actor himself, he has tried to create something that makes him think, ``I want to dance in this aspect,'' but no matter how much I try, I am never satisfied. "The more I do it, the more difficult it is. I want to make something that I don't want to give to anyone, even if it's just one aspect of my life."
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1494028 (stock #K399)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A pumpkin lobed vase with silver inlay by Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 19.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 27 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition. This is a great pair with the vase in the same form in simple Murashidao mottled olive tones by his son.
Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji, (1904-1987) studied metalwork under Ichioka Shiun from the age of 15 establishing his own workshop in 1925. His work was first publicly exhibited at the 1930 National Shokoten. Two years later he would be awarded at the Belgium World Exposition. He remained active throughout the troubled years of the mid-century for which he would receive the order of cultural merit from Takaoka City in 1967. Work by him is held in the Takaoka City Museum. He remained an active promoter of traditional bronze ware until his death in 1987. His son, the second generation Shiho would study under his father from 1957. He too is much lauded beginning with top prize at the 1974 Takaoka Traditional Craft Exhibition
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1990 item #1492453 (stock #K066)
The Kura
$800.00
Sale Pending
A cocoon shaped basket of tight weave with bamboo insert made for wall hanging by Maeda Chikubosai II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kake Kaki (Hanging Flower Receptacle). It is roughly 16 cm (6 plus inches) diameter, 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Maeda Chikubosai II (1917-2003), was born when his father, Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was already quite mature. Initially he studied plaiting techniques from younger artists in the family studio, and once mastered studied under his father, and Yamamoto Chikuryosai I (Shoen), becoming an independent artist in 1941 and succeeding to the Chikubosai name in 1950. He was accepted into the Nitten National Exhibition in 1953, and exhibited there consistently as well as in the Japan Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Dento Kogeiten). He was honored by the Japanese government in 1992, and was named a Living National Treasure for the bamboo crafts in 1995. Work by him is held in the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1485950
The Kura
sold, thank you
Bats, symbol of good fortune, flit over the sunset surface of this Ki-seto vase by Kato Sakusuke enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kiseto Kabin. An inscription inside begins Fukuju ? Zu (Lucky ? Image) and appears to be dated 1919 in the 60 year cyclical Zodiac calendar (possibly 1859). This is followed by the signature of a painter who also signed and dated the vase, indicating Sakusuke made the vase, while another artist provided the decoration. It is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, retaining the original cloth pouch.
Kato Sakusuke I (Sakube, 1808-1893) was born into a family of potters in Owari (mod. Aichi Prefecture). He took over the family business as Kato Kagekiyo and was known for producing both Japanese and Western ceramics for daily use such as sake sets and tea sets. He took the name Sakusuke in his later years. He was succeeded by his son. Kato Sakusuke II (Keizaburo, 1844-1923). He was an avid collector of ancient pottery and devoted himself to researching its shape and techniques. At first he fired porcelain, but later he turned to his main occupation and skillfully copied old pottery such as Furu-seto (old seto ware), Kizeto, Oribe, Shino, Ofukai, and Mishima. He became a master craftsman of the Meiji era with a technique as good as that of his father Kagekiyo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1491403 (stock #K028)
The Kura
$2,400.00
Sale Pending
A Kenzan style Chawan Tea Bowl decorated with blossoming plum bending over a golden rim by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original wooden box signed inside on the box floor by the aritst with an annotation inside the lid by Omotosenkei Iemoto Tea Master Seisai (1863-1937) reading Makuzu Yaki Chawan Ume-no-ga Ari (Makuzu Pottery Tea Bowl Decorated with Plum). It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter, 7cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1474709
The Kura
sold, thank you
Additional photos of this fabulous Accordion book of 12 paintings by Kimura Seiun enclosed in a wooden box titled Atami Dan Ko-gasatsu and dated early Spring of Showa 4 (1929). The introductory page is written by Zen priest Hashimoto Dokuzan of Tenryuji Temple in Kyoto. The paintings are each signed with various names used by Kimura, mostly Seiun or Ren. The introductory and concluding pages are both dated 1929. It is 28 x 14 cm (5-1/2 x 11 inches) and in overall outstanding condition.
Atami is a place in Japan on the Izu peninsula South of Tokyo in Shizuoka prefecture.
  Kimura Seiun (1885-1967) was born in Shimane prefecture, home of one of the oldest and most venerated shrines in Japan, Izumo Taisha Shrine. His given name was Hara Renzaburo however he was adopted into the Kimura family taking that name. In 1921 he moved to Kyoto where he studied painting under Miyazaki Chikuso, and them to Tokyo where he studied under Komura Suiun. Post war he returned to Shimane, devoting himself to painting and private exhibitions, leading the quiet life of a scholar.
Hashimoto Dokuzan (Gengi, 1869-1938) was born in Nîigata, and was sent to Kyoto at the age of 16 to study painting and philosophy under the important literatus Tomioka Tessai. At the age of 20 he entered Tenryuji Temple under Hashimoto Gazan, later receiving Inka (recognition of enlightenment) from Ryuen. In 1910 he moved to Sokokuji, and then was assigned the foundation of Nanonji Temple in Tottori Prefecture. He served as abbot of Tenryuji Temple and Sokokuji, both important Zen temples in Kyoto.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1481278
The Kura
sold, thank you
A light raku chawan displaying a mitsuba-aoi family crest pressed into the side which has been shattered and repaired with black lacquer mellowed slightly brown, then broken again and repaired with gold. An amazing amount of work to save the fragments. The bowl is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter6.5 cm (2-1/2 inches) tall and comes enclosed in an old Kiri-wood collectors’ box.
Kintsugi is a traditional Japanese art form of repairing broken pottery or ceramics using lacquer and powdered precious metals. Instead of hiding the cracks and flaws, kintsugi embraces them and turns them into a beautiful and unique feature of the object. This practice holds several significant cultural and philosophical meanings in Japanese culture, particularly in relation to tea ceremonies: Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489472
The Kura
sold, thank you
A small vase sculpted in the shape of a cluster of roses covered in cockscomb red by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase shows the influence of Art-Nouveau, and Rokubei was one of the leading proponents of blending Western and Eastern ideals in clay art. The vase is 6.5cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 18.5cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in the original artist stamped cloth complete with the original black wood stand.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1491594 (stock #K078)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A glistening incense burner in the shape of a court cap by Eiraku Zengoro enclosed in the original signed wooden box dating from the 19th century. Gold designs gleam on the regal plum surface. It is 15cm×10.5cm,18cm (6 x 4 x 7-1/4 inches) and appears to be in perfect condition.
The Eiraku family is one of Japan’s most important and historically significant lines of pottery artists in Kyoto, tracing back to the 16th century. The skill of Eiraku potters earned the honorific title of Senke-Jissoku, reserved for 10 families of artisans who produce tea ceremony utensils for the san-Senke, or Japanese tea schools. Records and information on early generations of the Nishimura family were destroyed in the Tenmei fire (1788). The name Eiraku began being used by the 11th generation Hozen. Eiraku Zengoro XII (Wazen, 1823-1896) was one of the most influential potters of his time, setting the stage for the revival of and modernization of Kyoyaki, based on models by Koetsu, Kenzan and Ninsei. Although named Sentaro, he was more commonly referred to by the name Zengoro, and used also the name Wazen after 1865. He was trained under his father, Hozen, who was a compatriot of Ninnami Dohachi and Aoki Mokubei, and rightfully one of the most famous potters of the later Edo. Wazen was given the reins to the family business quite early, in 1843, and managed the day to day running of the kiln while his father sought to perfect porcelain products in Kyoto. From 1852 to 1865 the family worked from a kiln at Ninnaji temple. Attracting the attention of a Daimyo from Kaga, from 1866-1870 he worked to revitalize a porcelain kiln in that area, coming to produce classic wares which are prized to this day. During this time of working divided from the family kiln, two workers who had been trained by his father shared the title of the 13th generation leader in Kyoto, however Wazen outlived both by decades. He returned to Kyoto in 1870, and also established a kiln in Mikawa in the 1870s to produce more common tableware. From 1882 until his death, it seems he worked from a large kiln in the Eastern Hills of Kyoto. Under both the 11th and 12 generations of this family the name Zengoro took on a life of its own, and came to symbolize the highest in porcelain and tea wares. XIV (Tokuzaen) was born the first son of Eiraku Wazen, the 12th generation head of the family in 1853. Best known for Aka-e and Gosu, with a strong hand, he died in 1909. Eiraku Myozen (1852-1927) was the wife of Eiraku Tokuzen and was a rarely accepted female potter of the Meiji to Early Showa eras, protecting and propelling the name of Eiraku into a new generation. She guided the family through the volatile years of the late Meiji and Taisho eras, and added a delicate touch to the Eiraku oeuvre. Her work was especially favored by 12th generation head of Omote Senkei Seisai. Pieces by her are held in the Seattle Art Museum and Freer Sackler Gallery among others.