The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492597 (stock #Z086)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A skeleton sits among the dried grasses, alone and forgotten, perhaps reflecting on his life in this earie painting by Buddhist priest Higuchi Ryuon dated Meiji 6 (1873). Ink on paper, it is 41.5 x 179.5 cm (16-1/4 x 70-1/2 inches) and is in fine condition; completely remounted in a border of two subtle shades of black with colorful piping and features black lacquered rollers with mother of pearl flakes. It comes in a kiri-wood box.
Higuchi Ryuon (1800-1885) was a priest of the Jodo sect of Buddhism active from the later Edo through the Meiji periods. Born in Aizu (modern day Fukushima) he studied at the Higashi Honganji Takakura Gakuryo and served at Onjoji in Omi (modern day Shiga Prefecture) as well as Chishakkuin in Kyoto before becoming head priest of Enkoji Temple in Kyoto. He has recently come to attention when it was discovered he had a copy of the Bible in his personal effects.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1470055 (stock #O005)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A solitary thatched hermitage rises on the top of this stony crag set onto a beautifully carved and signed rosewood stand. Together they are 7.5 x 11.5 x 13 cm (3 x 4-1/2 x 5 inches) and in excellent condition. The box is titled Yasegawa-ishi, inside signed Seicho and dated a fortunate day in the second month of 1936.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1470340 (stock #OC046)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An iconic work with dynamic floral pattern in pale white on pink by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taireiji Ichirinsashi. It is 19.5 cm (7-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The vase retains the original wood stand and stamped cloth pouch. Undeniably Taireiji was the most important development by this innovative artist, and pieces are exceedingly rare.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1480950
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite Edo period incense burner, the fine red clay covered in running bamboo glaze from the kilns of Takatori on the southern Island of Kyushu wrapped in a silk pouch and enclosed in a period Kiri-wood box. The lid is solid silver pierced with roiling fronds. It is 7.5 cm diameter, 7 cm tall excluding the silver lid, and in excellent condition.
Takatori-yaki, is a traditional style of Japanese pottery that originated in the early 17th century. It was developed in the town of Takatori (mod. Fukuoka Prefecture). Takatori-yaki is renowned for its unique and distinctive aesthetic, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy tones and running glaze. The history of Takatori pottery dates back to the beginning of the Edo period (1603-1868) when a Korean potter named Yi Sam-pyeong, also known as Ri Sampei in Japanese, settled in the area. Yi Sam-pyeong had been brought to Japan by the powerful daimyo (feudal lord) Hosokawa Tadaoki, who ruled over the Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture). Tadaoki was fascinated by Korean pottery and invited skilled potters from Korea to establish kilns in Japan, with Yi Sam-pyeong being one of them. Under the patronage of the Hosokawa family, Yi Sam-pyeong and his descendants established the Takatori kilns in the town of Takatori. Initially, the kilns produced pottery influenced by Korean styles, particularly the Buncheong and Ido wares. However, over time, they developed their own distinct style, blending Korean techniques with Japanese aesthetics. Takatori was highly prized by tea masters and samurai lords who appreciated its rustic charm and humble beauty. Takatori-yaki became an integral part of the tea ceremony culture, as its earthy tones and natural glazes were considered suitable for the serene and rustic atmosphere of tea houses.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1486080
The Kura
$780.00
A hand painted cloth banner decorated with imagery by various artists including the Nanga School literati artists Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) and Nakanishi Koseki (1807-1884) as well as Tanaka Koha of the Kagetsuan School of Sencha and Confucian scholar Goto Shoin (1797-1864) and Hirose Kyokuso (1807-1863) who were two of the most important followers of Rai Sanyo. The date Konoe-saru (year of the monkey in metal) is visible in both the central leaf and the lower left gourd image. Judging then by the 60 year cyclical zodiac calendar it dates from the fifth month of 1860. The title, signed Shochiku-Rojin (the old man Shochiku), reads Betsu-yu-ten-chi-hi-jin-kan, a poetic phrase meaning there are other worlds aside from that of the human plane, specifically alluding to a world without human desire. Perhaps when these learned gentlemen gathered for tea beyond this curtain, they felt that they had experienced one of these other worlds. The cloth is 91 x 160 cm (36 x 63 inches) including a pouch through which a bamboo stave would have been run for hanging. Toned somewhat with age, the fibers are strong.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1490628
The Kura
$900.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful ivory white vase in the shape of a handled-wooden-bucket, the outside wrapped with woven bamboo forming an outer bamboo basket shell, with the handle wrapped in bamboo rope. It is 42 cm (16 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Tobe-yaki Kabin signed by the maker. Inside the lid is an inscription stating the vase was received as a gift on the 6th day of the 11th month of Taisho 8 (1919).
Tobe-yaki originated in 1777 when Katō Yasutoki, 9th lord of the Ōzu Domain (1769–1787), started hiring potters from Hizen for production of white porcelain (hakuji). The area was long known for production of fine whetstones, and as the amount of whetstone deposits dried up, the waste was powdered for the making of pottery. During the Edo period (1603-1868), Tobe ware developed independently since there was limited information from other competing domains. After the abolition of the feudal system and the establishment of prefectures in 1871 it became possible to import technology from famous production areas such as Karatsu and Seto which led Tobe ware to expand rapidly. As technology started to make mass production possible, Tobe ware expanded its market into Southeast Asia. Then during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and Showa period (1926-1988), porcelain producing areas such as Seto increased their production volume by adopting modern technology like mechanical potter's wheels, leading the handicraft Tobe ware to stagnate. However, Yanagi Soetsu (1889-1961), one of the founders of the Mingei movement lauded its high quality technique, ensuring the tradition continue.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1488230
The Kura
sold, thank you
Phoenix soar among golden clouds on this amazing Lacquer box made for holding a Tsuzumi drum by Miura Meiho (1900-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Houn Maki-e Tuzumi Bako. It is bound with silk chord which is held to the box with solid silver hardware. Inside it is lined with brocade. The box is 30.5 x 24 x 24.5 cm (12 x 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches) an is in perfect condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1491767 (stock #K046)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A vase by Kiyomizu Rokubei V featuring auspicious calligraphic characters opposite a boy staring at the moon from atop his ox decorated by Domoto Insho enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 22 x 15 x 37 cm (9 x 6 x 14-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
Domoto Insho (b. 1891) was a Kyoto artist, trained in the traditional Shijo manner, but not one to be bound by its rigidity. He studied at the Kyoto Municipal School of Fine Arts, and under the important artist Nishiyama Suishi. Consistently exhibitied at the large National exhibitions (Nitten, Bunten) while fighting for greater acceptance of artworks. He traveled to Europe in 1952, and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy and winner of the Imperial Fine Arts Academy Prize, ultimately receiving the Order of Cultural Merit (highest prize allocated to a civilian in Japan). His works moved steadily toward the abstract, as we will see with the next listing. A true Jiyu-gakka, he refused to be defined by any school and was incredibly influential in his time and perhaps even more so after. His works are held in the collection of many internationally renowned institutions including the Museum of Fine Art, Boston, Tokyo National Museum and Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art. And in fact there is a museum dedicated to him in Kyoto, the Domoto Insho Museum.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492088 (stock #K048)
The Kura
$700.00
An Edo period Kogo incense case of pale earth tones decorated with geometric shapes and green copper glaze in the oribe style with a scrawling streak of kintsugi gold extending down two sides. Kintsugi is the art of repairing using lacquer and powdered gold. Kintsugi is a traditional Japanese art form of repairing broken pottery or ceramics using lacquer and powdered precious metals. Instead of hiding the cracks and flaws, kintsugi embraces them and turns them into a beautiful and unique feature of the object. This practice holds several significant cultural and philosophical meanings in Japanese culture. The piece is roughly 7 cm (3 inches) diameter and comes wrapped in an antique padded silk wrapping cloth in an age darkened kiri-wood box with deer leather ties. The box is annotated Ko-Oribe Ume-gata Kogo (Old Oribe Plum-shaped Incense Container) by Seisai, (1863-1937), the 12th head of the Omotesenkei School of Tea. Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493058 (stock #K097)
The Kura
$1,350.00
Polished layered-lacquer lozenges are inlayed into the surface of this fabulous Art-Deco era vase by important Japanese Bronze artist Yamamoto Junmin. The lacquered pieces have been cut and polished from variously colored layered lacquer. The vase is signed on the base Junmin, and measures 27.5 cm (11 inches) diameter, 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall. It is in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Junmin (1882 – 1962) learned the metal arts under Katori Hotsuma (Hozuma) and Asakura Fumio at the Tokyo University of Art. Living in Nara, the ancient capital, he was one of the finest metal workers of his age, carrying on the Edo-doki tradition through the early Showa era while also incorporating many ideas and innovations from Art Deco into hos oeuvre. His work was exhibited with the Teiten/Bunten National Exhibitions many times before the second world war, and with the Nitten National Exhibition post-war. The National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto holds two works by this important bronze artist, as well as the Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491725 (stock #N10)
The Kura
$1,350.00
This scroll is an excellent example of the early Showa era style of Shirakura Niho centering around 1930 enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Teishu Sotai. The painting features two persons in a boat contemplating a precipitous waterfall which extends up through the clouds. The phrase Teishu Sotai in old Japanese translates to "meeting of moored boats" in English. It is often used metaphorically to describe a chance encounter or a meeting between two people who happen to be in the same place at the same time, similar to how two boats might meet while anchored or moored. It is 39.5 x 196 cm (15-1/2 x 77 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1492443 (stock #Z092)
The Kura
$1,700.00
Love lasts beyond the grave, here a skeleton walks, her pate decorated with flowers and a bundle of daisies in her hand as she strolls grinning under the shade of a dilapidated umbrella held by an attendant, a poignant painting signed Shoken dating from the Taisho period (1922). The four character verse above is taken from the Lotus sutra (Hanya-Shingyo) and reads shikisokuzeku, meaning (loosely) all color is void, the void is all color. Completely restored in a chic Tsumugi cloth border with black lacquered wooden rollers, the scroll is 59 x 192 cm (23-1/2 x 75-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
$1,500.00
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1487710 (stock #OC019)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Reaching for his hat, the boatman leans out arms extended toward the prow, protected from the elements under a woven reed roof. This beautiful incense burner comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 x 8 x 10 cm (9-1/2 x 3-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1488705
The Kura
sold, thank you
A protective deity is carved into this Piece of a pillar from Himeji Castle dating from the Meiji period restoration of the Tenshukaku (main tower). It is branded with the Yaki-in which reads Himeji Jo Ko-zai-in (Brand of the old wood from Himeji Castle). It has long been a method of raising funds in Japan to offer replaced pieces of a historical building to those who donate to the restoration. These pieces are commonly branded with a special seal, called a yaki-in, which is heated and burnt into the surface, stating from which famous building the Ko-zai or old material, comes from. This large piece also has on another side written “Keicho 5 (1602) Ikeda Terumasa Chikujo (Castle made by Ikeda Terumasa) Kokuho Himeji Jo Tenshukaku Kozai (Old material from the Main Tower of National Treasure Himeji Castle) Yonkai Ko-neta (4th Floor small joist). It is 89 cm (35 inches) tall, 12 x 13 cm (roughly 5 inches) square.
Himeji Castle dates to 1333 when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346 and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For almost 700 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters including the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake. Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures.
In 1873 (Meiji 6), many of Japan's castles were destroyed due to the Castle Abolition Ordinance as they were seen as symbols of the former government (Shogun) and were no longer necessary for defense, but around 1877 (Meiji 10), when the major changes at the beginning of the Meiji period had come to an end, there was born a movement to preserve the countries castles. At the request of Colonel Shigeto Nakamura, who oversaw construction and repairs in the Army, Himeji Castle was also preserved with national funds, including its large and small castle towers and turrets, along with Nagoya Castle (Unfortunately, Nagoya Castle was later burnt down in the war). following, temporary repairs were carried out, but due to lack of funding, full-scale renovation was postponed until 1910. At this time the large castle tower was repaired along with the remaining small castle towers (east small castle tower, west small castle tower, inui small castle tower) in the first phase of construction.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469135 (stock #L013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Layer upon layer of lacquer has been carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the surface in a style known as Guri by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in a wooden box titled Guri Kobon. It is 23 x 33 cm (9 x 13 inches) and in excellent condition, the artist seal inlayed in mother of pearl beneath. The box is annotated by his adopted daughter and heir Torako (Suwa Sozan II).
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1950 item #1492336 (stock #K052)
The Kura
Sale Pending
A set of two incense items carved from blocks of dried lacquer, the surfaces polished to reveal the various layers and colors of lacquer used in a mottled pattern. Truly quite spectacular despite their diminutive size, the koro is 10 x 6 x 7.5 cm (4 x 2-1/4 x 3 inches), the kogo is 4 cm (1-1/2 inches) diameter and both are in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1486011
The Kura
$2,000.00
A lovely tray in the shape of a split lotus leaf by Ito Tetsugai enclosed in a period wooden box titled Sencha Shiki Habon. It is roughly 53 x 25 cm (20-1/2 x 10 inches), expertly carved to be incredibly thin. Trays like these were used as decorative objects in the service of steeped green tea, and were very popular from the Meiji through early Showa eras.