The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1481717
The Kura
sold, thank you
A serene vision of enlightenment, calming and compassionate, can be seen in the later Edo period Buddhist carving of Amitabha. He stands on a lotus base, with a flame like mandala rising up behind him in the shape of a jewel, the entire gilded in pure gold worn soft with age and care. The figure alone is 39 cm (15-1/2 inches) tall. With the base and mandala, it is 65.5 cm (just under 26 inches) tall. It is in excellent condition. I believe that some restoration has been performed on the delicately sculpted hands in the past, not uncommon in the most earthquake prone country on the planet.
Amida Buddha, also known as Amida Nyorai or Amitabha Buddha, is an important figure in Mahayana Buddhism, particularly in the Pure Land Buddhism tradition which permeates Japan. He is revered as a celestial Buddha who resides in the Pure Land, a realm of ultimate enlightenment and liberation from suffering. Pure Land Buddhism and the belief in Amida Buddha were introduced to Japan during the 8th century. The key figure responsible for bringing Pure Land teachings to Japan was the monk, scholar, and imperial advisor named Genshin (942-1017). Genshin is considered the founder of the Japanese Pure Land school and played a significant role in popularizing the Pure Land teachings in the country. Genshin was deeply influenced by the Chinese Pure Land master Shan-tao (613-681) and his teachings on Amitabha Buddha's Pure Land. Shan-tao was a renowned exponent of Pure Land Buddhism, and his writings and teachings had a profound impact on the development of the Pure Land tradition in East Asia. Genshin's most famous work, "Ojoyoshu" (The Essentials of Rebirth in the Pure Land), written in 985, became a seminal text in Japanese Pure Land Buddhism. In this treatise, Genshin elaborated on the concept of Amida Buddha's Pure Land and the practice of reciting the Nembutsu (Namu Amida Butsu) as a means of attaining birth in the Pure Land after death. After the establishment of the Pure Land school, Pure Land Buddhism gained popularity among the common people and members of the aristocracy in Japan. The teaching of salvation through faith in Amida Buddha's vow and the chanting of the Nembutsu resonated with the aspirations of people seeking a simple and accessible path to enlightenment. Over time, other prominent figures and schools contributed to the spread and development of Pure Land Buddhism in Japan. Notably, Honen (1133-1212), the founder of the Jodo Shu (Pure Land School) in the Kamakura period, and Shinran (1173-1263), the founder of the Jodo Shinshu (True Pure Land School), played significant roles in popularizing Pure Land Buddhism and further shaping its doctrines.
Amida Buddha and Pure Land Buddhism continue to be influential and revered in various Asian countries, especially in Japan, where it has a significant presence as one of the major Buddhist traditions. The belief in Amida Buddha's compassion and the aspiration to reach his Pure Land remain important elements in the spiritual lives of millions of Buddhists around the world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1491120 (stock #K009)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A diminutive image of Hotei (Putai) the lucky god of fortune from the Edo period kilns of the Matsudaira clan of Matsue in their distinct golden color. It is 4.5 x 3.3 x 4 cm tall and is in excellent condition. Fushina-yaki was the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue Han in modern day Izumo, established around 1764. It fell strongly under the aesthetic taste of Matsudaira Harusato (1751-1818) Daimyo of the province and one of the most influential Tea Masters of the later Edo period. His style of ceremony continues to this day as the Fumai-ryu style of tea.
Flagging in the late 19th century, artists such as the great scholar and Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu sought to revitalize it, and came to Shimane to decorate the works or to teach decoration and painting techniques. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro in the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1473297 (stock #MW010)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A rare iron hanging censer in the shape of a Mongolian Saddle Stirrup (Abumi) with silver mesh lid covering half the top. It comes in an age-darkened and worm-eaten kiri-wood box titled simply Tsuri Koro. The receptacle is 13.5 x 7 x 15 cm (5-1/2 x 3 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1492641 (stock #K051)
The Kura
$2,100.00
The bird-faced Kami (god) Doryo Daigongen strikes a powerful pose astride the back of a mischievous white fox. Doryo is purported to have been an ascetic monk who turned himself into a Tengu when he vowed on his deathbed to protect the Mountain Temple Complex of Daiyuzen in modern day Kanagawa prefecture. This legend inspired a cult which rose to great prominence in the Edo period. To this cult the figure was the ward of Budo (martial arts). Originally this figure would have had feathered wings, which have been lost to time, and it is likely the soot encrusted figure was also once adorned in color and the fox was white, but that too has been all buried beneath centuries of soot from incense smoke. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall. There is some damage to his right hand, tip of the beak and foxes tail.
Tengu are mountain and forest goblins with both Shinto and Buddhist attributes. The patron of martial arts, the bird-like Tengu is a skilled warrior and mischief maker, especially prone to playing tricks on arrogant and vainglorious men, and to punishing those who willfully misuse knowledge and authority to gain fame or position. In Buddhist lore they came to be protectors of temples and defenders of the Dharma (Buddhist Law).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1491103 (stock #K008)
The Kura
$550.00
Sale Pending
A Fushina (Fujina) yaki image of the three monkeys made to support the Kettle lid in the Japanese Tea Ceremony dating from the Edo period. A warning to all, the little creatures hear nothing, see nothing and speak nothing. What happens in the tea room, stays in the tea room! The figure is 4.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter the same height and in excellent condition. Impressed into the base is the Rakuzan seal. It comes in an antique woven thread pouch.
Rakuzan pottery falls under the umbrella of Fushina or Fujina Yaki, the Goyogama clan kiln of the Matsudaira of Matsue in modern day Izumo, sometimes simply called Izumo-yaki. The origin of Rakuzan ware lies in the early Edo period, when the second generation Matsudaira Tsunataka requested a Hagi ware potter from the neighboring Mori clan, which was eventually granted to the third generation Izumo leader Matsudaira Tsunachika around 1677. The founders of the kiln were Kurasaki Gonbei and Kada Hanroku. Although under continuous production, the kiln had its ups and downs until it was strongly revived by the 8th Lord of Matsue, Matsudaira Harusato (Fumaiko 1751-1818) Daimyo of the province. From then it fell strongly under his aesthetic taste. Flagging in the late 19th century, artists such as the great scholar and Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu sought to revitalize it, and came to Shimane to decorate the works or to teach decoration and painting techniques. It became an important influence on the Mingei movement and was visited by Bernard Leach, Hamada Shoji and Kawai Kanjiro in the early 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1472140 (stock #TCR7104)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Tiny repairs of gold glint along the rim of this misshapen wan-gata bowl from the Utsutsukawa tradition of Nagasaki. The bowl comes with a silk pouch enclosed in an old wooden box. There is a kutsuki on one side, where it adhered to something else in the kiln. The bowl is 12 x 10.5 x 6.5 cm (4-3/4 x 4-1/8 x 2-1/2 inches) and is in overall fine condition, dating from the 19th century.
Utsutsukawa-yaki originated in Nagasaki in the late 17th century. It is said it began when Tanaka Gyobusaemon opened a kiln around 1690. It is characterized by brown orange clay with a heavy iron content and was most often decorated with Brush strokes in white slip. Although at one time it was called the Ninsei of the West, the manufacture lasted only about 50 years due to the financial aspect of the clan, and it disappeared until the Meiji period, when there was an attempted revival, but that too failed to last. In modern times the art was revived by Yokoishi Gagyu, and has been named an important cultural property of Nagasaki Prefecture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1490851
The Kura
sold, thank you
A lovely work reflecting the simplicity of Art Deco predominant from the 1920s and 30s by master of the genre Ito Suito enclosed in the original signed wooden box The vase is 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Ito Suito (Yoshiharu, 1894-1980) was born in Kyoto and apprenticed under Ito Tozan in 1911. In 1918 he married his daughter, and took the family name and at the same time assumed the name Suito. In 1929 he was first exhibited at the Teiten National Exhibition, and opened his own kiln in 1931 in the Gojo-zaka pottery district of Kyoto. This was the beginning of a long career which would see him displayed and prized at such venues as the Nitten and Kyoten exhibitions. He would be awarded by Kyoto city for his lifes work in 1975 (Kyoto Bijutsu Kogei Koro-sho award) and again in 1979 granted the title Carrier of the Cultural Heritage of Kyoto City (Kyotoshi Bunka Korosha).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1478842
The Kura
sold, thank you
A rare Seto Heishi (also read Heiji) bottle dating from the Kamakura period (1192-1333) wrapped in a custom made silk pouch with age darkened Kiri-wood box. Streaks of an unusual blue shidare glaze are visible on one side, Unlike the vast majority of Heishi bottles, this piece is no unearthed or excavated but has been passed down from generation to generation (as evidenced by the lack of inclusions or calcification). It is 24 cm tall and in overall excellent condition, with only minor chips about the rim. Included is a printed image of the piece titled Seto Haiyu Heishi, Kamakura period. This appears to have been cut from an exhibition catalog, and one can guess it has been exhibited.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1920 item #1473099
The Kura
sold, thank you
A bronze crane in dark almond colored patina of superb craftsmanship dating from the late 19th to early 20th century (Meiji period). It is quite large at 48.5 cm tall (19 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1900 item #1492335 (stock #K055)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A delicate kiri-wood tray decorated with a fledgling among grass puffed up against the cold by important 20th century artist Domoto Insho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kosuzume Seifu (Small Sparrow, Pure Wind) and signed inside Insho Saku. It is 19 x 19 x 2.5 cm (7-1/2 x 7-1/2 x 1 inch) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1493628 (stock #K077)
The Kura
$2,200.00
Golden Maple leaves and five petaled plum blossoms float on the golden pond pooling on this early Edo period Karatsu Chawan decorated with a single Zen circle. Superb quality repairs gleam about the rim, one large repair decorated over top of the gold with fine amages of leaves and blossoms. The base is small and shallow, indicative of the early era. It is 12 cm (just less than 5 inches) diameter, 7.5cm (3 inches) tall and comes enclosed in an old wooden box.
Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1490654
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fabulous bowl by the first-generation Kato Keizan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tenranji Zuicho Moyo Hachi (Bowl with Blue Glaze Decorated with Auspicious Birds). Tenran is a blue glaze made by the official kiln of the Qing Dynasty in China. On this in raised white auspicious birds with long tails like dragons circle the rim over archaic symbols reflecting continental taste popular from the Meiji through Taisho to early Showa period. It is 24.5 cm (9-1/2 inches) diameter 13 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kato Keizan I (1886-1963) was born in Tajimi city, Gifu, a pottery center in its own right, however came to Kyoto to apprentice under Kiyomizu Rokubei IV (1848-1920). He established himself in 1912 in the same neighborhood in Kyoto, where he became well known for celadon and Chinese based porcelain forms. He was especially remembered for Tenryuji seiji (Chinese Long Quan celadon porcelain). Works by this artist are held in the National Museum of Modern Art, Kyoto among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1492240 (stock #K042)
The Kura
$650.00
A spiraling form in softly gleaming golden brown by Yajima Boshu enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled simply Jundo Kabin (Pure Bronze Vase). It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 27.5 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base with a silver cartouche.
Yajima Boshu (1925-2001) was born in Takaoka, one of the most important bronze producing regions in Japan. He was first exhibited at the 13th National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten) in 1966, and exhibited consistently with that venue. He received top prize in 1968 at the 7th Toyama Traditional Crafts Exhibition. He exhibited at the 1st National Traditional Ne Metal Artist Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kinko Shinsaku-ten) and was awarded top prize there in both 1973 and 1974, the start of a highly lauded career.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1481960
The Kura
sold, thank you
A looping handle sweeps above this fabulous bowl decorated with burgeoning gourds by Takahashi Dohachi VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 21 x 18 x 15 cm (8 x 7 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Takahashi Dohachi VI (1881-1941) was born the second son of the 4th generation Dohachi in Kyoto. He was too young to succeed the family name upon his fathers early demise, and a a potter named Ogawa Yunosuke steered the helm as the 5th Dohachi until he too passed away in 1914. Dohachi VI took over in 1915. A close compatriot of Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan II, his work was presented to the Showa Emperor at his coronation.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491425 (stock #N04)
The Kura
$2,000.00
This is a fabulous painting dated 1930 by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ko-Ten-Bo-Setsu (Twilight Snow in the Bay). Viewing it one can hear the silence, the soft pattering of snow and the flap of wings as geese take flight in the distance. Shirakura Niho was from Niigata prefecture, so was a man who not only knew snow well, but was well known for his snowy landscapes. The scene is performed in ink and light color with white gofun on silk in a patterned cloth border extended with beige and features rosewood rollers. The scroll measures 64.5 x 136.5 cm (25-1/4 x 54 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Niîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Folk Art : Pre 1920 item #1470454 (stock #MOR7111)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A shop sign carved from a block of knotted wood in the shape of a tea leaf jar engraved on both sides with the character Cha (Tea) originally gilded which still reflects light from the correct angle. A large knot making up one shoulder has split apart in the center, while the outside edge remains intact. A perfect example of the Japanese aesthetic of wabisabi. It is 32 x 3 x 32.5 cm (roughly 13 x 1 x 13 inches). The sign has been restored at some time in the past, the green and black pigments freshened up at the time.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1485801
The Kura
sold, thank you
The cormorant prepares to take flight, wings extended, captured in bronze in a moment of excitement, the shapr eyes focused ahead. Captivating realism with simple Art-deco overtones signed below the tail. It is 32 x 36.5 x 25 cm (14-1/2 x 13 x 10 inches) and is in excellent condition. The cormorant, known in Japanese simply as U, is a migratory bird native to the east Palearctic with a range from Taiwan to the Russian Far East. It has a black body with a white throat and cheeks and a partially yellow bill. It is one of the species of cormorant that has been domesticated by fishermen in a tradition known in Japan as ukai. This method of fishing is often depicted in art and is now a popular tourist attraction during the brief Ukai season.