The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1469959 (stock #MW013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite dark bronze image of the deity Benzaiten playing a four stringed lute known as a Biwa signed in a cartouche inset into the base and dating from the early 20th century (Later Meiji to taisho period). The figure is 20 x 16 x 18 cm (8 x 6 x 7 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Benzaiten (or Benten) is the Japanese embodiment of Saraswati, the hindu god of the arts. Benzaiten is depicted a number of ways in Japanese art. She is often depicted holding a biwa (a traditional Japanese lute) similar to how Saraswati is depicted with a veena in Indian art In medieval Japan, Benzaiten came to be associated with a number of Buddhist and local deities, which include the goddess Kisshōten (the Buddhist version of the Hindu Lakshmi), the snake god Ugajin (thus Benzaiten is sometimes depicted with a snake) and the kami Ichikishimahime. Apart from being a patron of music and the arts, she was also worshiped as one of the Seven Gods of Fortune (Shichifukujin).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1478247 (stock #MW008)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A white bronze sculpture of crashing waves supporting three glass orbs; an elegant form carrying good fortune from old Japan. It is 49 cm (19-1/4 inches) long and in overall excellent condition. Set it in the window and watch the orbs blow colorful prisms across the room.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1487806
The Kura
Price on Request
An exquisite large seated image of Jizo Bosatsu, the protective deity of children and travelers, sits resplendent atop a lotus, one leg dangling, his Shakujo staff and golden Jewel held aloft in his hands. This is a superb rendition, the carving of the face showing great detail and care, the robes flowing with intricate designs, and the entire gilded in gold. This serenely graceful figure exemplifies the idealistic sculptural style that was often employed to convey the special ethos of Pure Land Buddhism: Jizō's warm, truthful facial features give him a compassionate expression that invites faith, which, in turn, will lead to salvation. His gently flowing robe, with its finely crafted gold-leaf designs, enhances the impression of elegant refinement. Edo period, 18th century, the total is 87 cm (almost three feet) tall, the image is 48.5 cm (19 inches) tall including the lowered leg. It is in excellent condition.
We have many more photos of this piece, please inquire if you would like to see them.
Jizō is a Bosatsu (Bodhisattva), one of a group of enlightened beings who choose to delay entry into Nirvana in order to help others. Represented in the guise of a Buddhist monk and devoid of the crown and jewels customarily worn by Bodhisattva, Jizo Bosatsu is among the most readily recognizable and beloved of the many deities in the Japanese Buddhist pantheon. Called Ksitigarbha ("Earth Womb") in Sanskrit, Jizo vowed not to enter Nirvana until the realms of hell were emptied. Primarily known as the Bodhisattva of the Hell Realm, he travels to all of the Six Realms and is a guide and guardian of those between rebirths. In classic iconography, he is depicted as a monk carrying a wish-fulfilling jewel and a staff with six rings, one for each realm. This staff is based on the belief that this deity does not reside in the Pure Land, but rather remains active in this world. His statues are a common sight, especially by roadsides and in graveyards. He is worshiped as the guardian of the souls of Mizuko, stillborn, miscarried, or aborted fetuses, and is considered the protector of children. He is also believed to be one of the protective deities of travelers.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1920 item #1473519
The Kura
sold, thank you
The androgynous Kannon sits in meditation under climbing rocks and tumbling waves deeply carved into the side of this bamboo incense container dating from the early 20th century (late Meiji to Taisho period). It is 34 cm long (13-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition, a superb example of the genre. This would have been used to hold incense sticks.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1478249
The Kura
sold, thank you
A carved lacquer box which pays homage to Chinese literary taste while presenting itself clearly in a modern, Japanese way (for turn of the century lacquerware at least) by 2nd generation lacquer artist Ishii Yusuke enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The tsuishu lacquer technique requires applying layer upon layer of lacquer which is then carved through and polished, a painstaking process. This piece is exquisitely crafted, carved and polished revealing the many layers of lacquer, it is 13.5 x 10.5 x 5.5 cm (5-1/2 x 4 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition. On bottom in a bell-shaped gold cartouche are the characters Yusuke. According to the box it was held in the collection of the Kuriyama Sodo, home of Ishizaka Sennosuke who was a member of the governing assembly of Toyama prefecture.
Ishii Yusuke (1851-1925) was born the second son of the lacquer artist Ishii Yusuke (different characters, 1810-1886) in the waning years of the Edo period. After learning from his father, he became independent, establishing a second branch family in the Yusuke Lacquer Tradition. The first Yusuke Ishii Founded Yusuke lacquerware and created Chinese-style lacquerware in Takaoka, Toyama Prefecture. He pioneered rust painting and gold leaf techniques to express Chinese-style paintings of flowers, birds, and landscapes three-dimensionally on ancient vermilion or matte lacquer. Later, the eldest son succeeded as Yusuke II
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488233
The Kura
$395.00
A carved wooden bowl wrapped in floral motifs dating from the early 20th century signed beneath by the carver. The dimensional imagery depicts lotus leaves, lotus root and clusters of Biwa (loquat) fruit. It is 21 x 20 x 5 cm (roughly 8 inches diameter, 2 inches tall) and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1487635
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gohon crackled pale glaze covers this Tenmoku shaped Chawan decorated with a blossoming plum harbinger of Spring, signed Sozan followed by a long verse in dramatic calligraphy. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy. Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However, unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1475187
The Kura
sold, thank you
An incredible Mishima Chawan dating from the Edo period with a wide repair to the rim in dark lacquer decorated with golden grasses in gold maki-e lacquer designs. It comes in an ancient dilapidated silk pouch with cotton buffer enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box titled Mishima Chawan. The bowl is 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall, 12.5 -13.5 cm (5-1/2 -6 inches) diameter and in fine condition. Mishima ware refers to different types of imported and adopted Japanese pottery. Mishima originally refers to the shimamono pottery imported from the islands of Taiwan, Luzon, and "Amakawa" (Macau). They were characterized by being roughly-made and often uneven, thus epitomizing the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi. HOwever the term overall came to refer to impressed and slip-inlayed ceramics in the Korean style like this bowl.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1470026 (stock #MW011)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifuly formed iron sake kettle known as a Choshi with a solid silver lid and featuring sliver inlay designs on the handle enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood bos titled Tetsu Choshi Jungin-futa. It is 8 cm (just over 3 inches) diameter, 16 cm (6 inches) to the top of the handle, and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1489649
The Kura
$1,200.00
An E-karatsu Yobitsugi bowl made of various shards attached with wide bands of gold to a discarded base: the pieces dating from the Momoyama to early Edo periods. It is 22 x 20 x 6 cm 8-1/2 x 8 x 2-1/4 inches) and comes enclosed in a modern kiri-wood collectors box titled E-Karatsu Hachi.
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #1487190
The Kura
$2,500.00
A Hikeshi-Banten Fireman Jacket decorated with protective images of waves and birds outside in various dyed colors and sashiko stitching, the inside emblazoned with a dragon and tiger; symbols respectively of wisdom and protection (the dragon is a water god) and ferocity and bravery as the tiger knows no fear. The handmade coats were fashioned from several layers of highly absorbent quilted cotton fabric. They were then resist-dyed using the tsutsugaki method, which involved drawing rice-paste designs on the cloth, dyeing the cloth multiple times and then washing off the paste to reveal the layering of colors. They were worn plain side out and before firefighters entered the scene of a blaze, the coats were thoroughly soaked in water (they could weigh more than 75 pounds) to protect the men from burns and blunt the impact of falling objects as they went about their dangerous work. If firefighters were successful in extinguishing the blaze, they would turn their coats inside out and parade victoriously by cheering onlookers. According to the Denver Art Museum:
Decoration was important to firefighters’ garments, which were far from purely utilitarian uniforms. Firefighters enjoyed respect and high status in urban Japan, especially in Edo, where wood architecture and crowded living conditions led to frequent outbreaks of fire. Commoners wore reversible coats (hikeshi-banten) made of thick, quilted cotton fabric, with a plain indigo-dyed exterior and an elaborately decorated interior.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1486269
The Kura
$1,500.00
An antique gilt bronze Buddhist tower finial with three pierced flame flanges richly engraved with scrolling vines mounted on a hardwood pedestal It is 53 cm tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486054
The Kura
Price on Request
A spectacular Meiji to Taisho period Golden box decorated with a spray of flowers under an imperial Chrysanthemum. The interior and bottom are elegant Nashiji, and the border between box and lid is protected by a solid silver rim. Kirigane cut gold flakes decorate the raised leaves. It comes enclosed in a custom made kiri-wood storage box. The gilded receptacle is 30 x 24.5 x 14 cm (12 x 9-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches) and it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1478780
The Kura
sold, thank you
Crabs clamber through the tangled bamboo leaves decorating the rim of this crushed fluted pottery bowl from the kiln of Wake Kitei (also read Waki) dating from the 19th century. This piece shows a great influence from the southern Island of Kyushu and Korean ware, not only in the literati style depiction of crabs, but in the glaze itself which is very much in the vein of Karatsu and or Gohon ware, as well as in the swirling whirlpool inside the footring. The bowl is 28 x 18 x 12 cm (11 x 7 x 5 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened and somewhat dilapidated wooden box.
Kitei Yaki was begun in the mid 18th century in the environs of Kyoto by Kameya Kitei, a 3rd generation craftsman specializing in Dobin and Earthenware Braziers (Kama). He adopted the name Kitei. The second (some say 3rd) generation Kitei went to Kyushu to study Imari wares, developing the family line to include sencha and maccha tea ware as well as regular dishware. This is likely from the 4th generation (1826-1902), a potter representing Kyoto ware in the Meiji period. The 4th generation Kitei was born in Kyoto as the eldest son of the 3rd generation Kameya Heikichiro. In 1862, he inherited the family estate and called himself Kameya Heikichi. In the first year of the Meiji era, he took Wake as his surname. In 1873, he became a purveyor to the Kyoto Prefectural Government's industrial sector. After that, he participated in domestic expositions and exhibitions, where he was awarded including the Philadelphia World's Fair in 1876, the Paris World's Fair in 1878, and the Sydney World's Fair in 1879. Work by him is held in the British Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1470786 (stock #TCR7109)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A dynamic early porcelain work in vivid color by Kiyomizu Rokubei VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Futatsuki Kajutu Mon Kashiki (Sweets dish decorated with fruit) bearing his real name, indicating it predates his taking the name Rokubei in 1945. The box bears the seal of the Hattori Tokeiten, purveyors of fine art in Pre-war Japan. The porcelain is 19.7 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, signed on the bottom.
The Kiyomizu family potters managed one of the most productive workshops in Kyoto’s Gojozaka district throughout the second half of the Edo period. From the Meiji they began producing tableware for export and special pieces for government-sponsored exhibitions under Rokubei IV. Rokubei V led the kiln into the 20th century, and his son, Rokubei VI (1901-1980), would assume lead in 1945, taking the kiln through the tumultuous years after the Second World War. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, then the Kyoto Special School of Painting, before apprenticing under his father in 1925. He exhibited frequently and was often prized at the National Bunten, Teiten and Nitten Exhibits, where he later served as judge. He was also lauded abroad, in the USSR, France, Italy, Belgium and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy. In 1976 he was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit for his lifelong devotion to promoting Japanese pottery traditions. His works are held in numerous museums throughout the globe.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1470115 (stock #OC081)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exceptional web of gold interspersed with nishiki-cloth patterned designs on gold lacquer fuses this once broken 16th-17th century Koro with ami-me net patterned solid silver lid. This was likely originally made as a tea cup, considering that the entire interior is glazed. Broken and reassembled using the Kintsugi gold technique and placing unusual patterns on the missing portions, this is an exceptional work of art. The silver lid was likely made when it was repaired and repurposed as an incense burner. It is 8 cm diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and is in excellent condition. It comes in an antique cloth pouch with solid silver lid enclosed in a compartmentalized age-darkened kiri-wood box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1486460
The Kura
$500.00
A beautiful 2 Stage lacquered container covered in black lacquer decorated with flowering vines. The domed lid opens to reveal a circular tray removable to open a deep container. It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.