The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487331
The Kura
$2,500.00
A shard has been grafted into the side of this large misshapen Shino bottle dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period, the repair lined with gold. Gold also circle the neck where the discarded misfire was repaired, and gleams on the lip. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an age darkened wooden box titled Ko-Shino Tokkuri, Shoki no Kama (Old Shino Tokkuri, early Kiln era)
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. It is said that this technique was used as a sign of reconciliation between two warring factions during the Sengoku Period, the era of warfare surrounding the 1500s. It was common for the leaders of these factions to hold tea ceremonies with each other to negotiate peace. It is said that, when the negotiations were successful, yobitsugi was used to combine the tea sets used at the meeting where peace was decided.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1487183
The Kura
sold, thank you
A stunning large Menuki in the form of a writhing dragon of gilt copper dating from the 19th century, It is 7.5 cm (3 inches) long and in perfect condition, retaining both the original studs on back unused. The Year of the Dragon is coming up!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1485948
The Kura
sold, thank you
A rare large vase by Kanzan Denshichi decorated with a hermitage in the hills and a poem extolling the beauty of summers first rain by Kanzan Denshichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box bearing the Shountei seal, dating it between 1871 and 1890. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kanzan Denshichi (1821-1890) was born in the ceramic-producing area of Seto. He worked at the Koto kiln of the Ii family in the Hikone domain, moving to Kyoto when the kiln closed in 1862. In Kyoto, he established his workshop at the base of Kiyomizu-zaka where he worked under the name Terao Denshichi and is thought to have been one of the first ceramicists in Kyoto to specialize specifically in porcelain. In the first year of the Meiji era (1868) he worked to supply the Kyoto Prefectural Office, following which he studied Western painting and pottery decoration under Gottfried Wagner. In the following three years, production was renamed Shountei and he worked under the name Kato Kanzan. Kanzan’s works include porcelain tableware, both Western and Japanese in style, often decorated with brightly colored polychrome and gold. Some of these wares were made for export, and Kanzan also exhibited at international exhibitions, securing a gold medal at Paris in 1878 In 1881 during their visit to Japan, Queen Victoria’s grandsons: Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, and Prince George, Duke of York (George V), visited Kanzan’s workshop in Kyoto. The Imperial Household Ministry purchased Kanzan’s works, including some tableware for use in the Enriokan and other items in the style of the underglaze blue decorated Edo-period imperial porcelains known as kinri goyōtōki.
Pieces by Kanzan may be found in the collections of the Sannomaru Shōzōkan (Museum of the Imperial Collections) and Imperial Banqueting Department of Japan’s Imperial Household Agency, Tokyo National Museum and Kyoto Prefectural Library and Archives. The Victoria and Albert Museum has a pair of vases displayed at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition of 1876, a pair of ginger jars and four other small pieces. In 2014, the Sannomaru Shōzōkan devoted an exhibition to a Japanese-style polychrome dinner service made by Kanzan’s workshop for Prince Arisugawa Takehito: Beautiful Modern Kyoyaki (Kyoto-style ware) – Fine works by Kanzan Denshichi passed down within the Prince Arisugawa Family, 21 March – 22 June 2014.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1492338 (stock #K056)
The Kura
$495.00
The outside of this elegantly understated container is simply semitransparent red lacquer over cloth in the Tame-nuri style opening to reveal an interior glowing with large patches of applied gold and silver. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) square, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition, with minor marks from use on the bottom. Inside the box is contained a number of papers as well as a receipt from the late Meiji period, circa 1910.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1940 item #1470209
The Kura
sold, thank you
Toast the new years with this solid silver sake set made for celebrations. 3 solid silver cups, as well as a beautifully shaped silver sake kettle with lid, each piece bearing the jun-gin (Pure or 100 percent silver) mark. They come enclosed in a wooden box titled Jungin-sei Shuki (Solid Silver Sake Set). The kettle is 13 cm diameter, 18 cm wide at the spout. The largest cup is 12 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter. In total the set weighs 757 grams, or 1.65 pounds of pure silver!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1492828 (stock #K069)
The Kura
$1,575.00
A fabulous large porcelain vase by Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppoo) complete with a rosewood base enclosed in the original signed and compartmentalized wooden box titled Konko-yu Semi Monkizami Kabin (Golden Yellow Glazed Vase inscribed with Cicada Patterns). The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The baluster form rises to frets in the shape of stylized cicada under a belt of archaic figures and yotsu-domoe (yin-yang) symbols. It is 21 cm (just more than 8 inches) diameter 36.5 cm (14-3/4 inches) tall plus the base and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492224 (stock #K035)
The Kura
$1,150.00
The mouth of this vase opens like the thickly petaled chrysanthemum flower over a body decorated in thin blue with a roiling landscape of lakes and trees dotted with pavilions. It is an excellent example of the Hirado tradition in the 19th century. The vase is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter,28.8 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The story of Hirado porcelain begins with the Matsura clan, who ruled over the Hirado domain during the Edo period (1603-1868). The feudal lord Matsura Takanobu, played a pivotal role in the development of the industry. In the early 17th century, Takanobu, inspired by the burgeoning popularity of continental ceramics, sought to establish a local porcelain production center on the island. To realize his vision, he invited Korean potters, renowned for their expertise in ceramic artistry, to migrate to Hirado and share their knowledge. This influx of Korean artisans infused the local ceramic industry with new techniques, designs, and aesthetic sensibilities. Under the guidance of these Korean masters, Hirado kilns began producing exquisite porcelain wares that reflected both Korean influences and indigenous Japanese artistic elements. The early Hirado pieces often featured delicate forms, refined decoration, and a distinctive creamy white glaze that set them apart from other ceramic styles of the time. Hirado porcelain quickly gained favor among the Japanese aristocracy and became highly sought after for its exceptional craftsmanship and aesthetic appeal. Throughout the Edo era, Hirado porcelain flourished, enjoying patronage from feudal lords, samurai elites, and wealthy merchants. The Matsura clan's support and encouragement further fueled the growth of the local ceramic industry, leading to innovations in techniques and designs. In fact one of the defining characteristics of Hirado porcelain was its ability to adapt and incorporate various influences while maintaining its distinct identity. While initially inspired by Korean and Chinese ceramics, Hirado porcelain gradually evolved its own unique style, blending elements of traditional Japanese aesthetics with innovative approaches to form and decoration. This fusion of influences contributed to the allure and enduring appeal of Hirado porcelain both domestically and internationally.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1485802
The Kura
$800.00
Lavender and aquamarine coat the surface of this vase from the Kairakuen Kilns of the Ki branch of the Tokugawa family dating from the 19th century. The circular window between floral scrolls is made in the shape of the archaic character Kotobuki. The vase is 18 cm (7 inches) tall and in excellent condition, and bears the Kairakuen seal impressed into the base. It comes enclosed in an old kiri-wood collectors box titled Kairakuen-ki Juji Moyo Kabin (Kairakuen Vessel decorated with Character of fortune).
The Kairakuen kiln was the "garden kiln" sponsored by the Kii branch of the Tokugawa house, in modern day Wakayama founded in 1819. It operated irregularly, drawing upon the services of potters from various Kyoto workshops including the 9th and 10th Omotesenkei Heads Ryoryosai (1775-1825) and Kyukosai (1818-1860), 10th Raku Master Raku Tanyu (1795-1854), and Eiraku Zengoro XI (Nishimura Hozen, 1795–1854) among others . Kairakuen products reflect a marked revival of interest in Chinese ceramics in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This vase, with its restrained shape and overall turquoise enamel glaze, follows Qing [Ch'ing] dynasty ceramic models. The design of the four-character mark, "Made at Kairakuen," imitates enamel four-character seals appearing on Qing [Ch'ing] imperial wares.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1471840 (stock #OC053)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A long verse is incised into the side of this tea bowl by Otagaki Rengetsu. The poem reads:
Yorozuyo mo 10,000 ages
tae nu nagare to enduring the surge
shimetsu ran so well
sono kame no o no From Turtle Tail Mountain
yama no shitamizu. The water flows
The bowl is 12.2 cm (5 inches) diameter and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in a silk cloth pouch, enclosed in an old box with original lid inside of which is a long verse. It has been appraised by the head priest of Jinkoin Tokuda Koen on a separate newer lid titled Rengetsu Ro-ni saku Chawan.
Otagaki Rengetsu was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1481801
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite hand-formed koro, the tri-legged form hammered from a single sheet of copper gilded with gold and signed on the base Goro. The top is created in the same manner pierced with three holes, and it has an insert of the same alloy to keep heat away from the softly gleaming body. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Uchidashi is a traditional Japanese metalworking technique that involves hammering or embossing designs onto the surface of metal objects. This technique is often used to create intricate patterns, textures, and relief designs on various metal objects, such as armor. Taking it to the extreme, and entire three dimensional object such as a koro or animal figurine, can be hammered out from a single plate of metal. Uchidashi is a labor-intensive technique that requires a high level of skill, precision, and artistic creativity. It has been traditionally used in the creation of decorative and functional metal objects. This technique showcases the mastery of Japanese metal craftsmen and their ability to turn simple pieces of metal into intricate works of art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469372 (stock #L016)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large table made of layers of lacquer carved through to reveal the various colors by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Guri Joku and bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in Seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 65 x 40.5 x 20 cm (25-1/2 x 16 x 8 inches) and is in excellent condition. The artists seal is expertly incised into the back of one ball shaped foot.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1492703 (stock #K088)
The Kura
$1,650.00
An image of the white robed Kannon (Quanyin), Goddess of Mercy, by Mashimizu Zoroku dating from the early 20th century. Exquisitely crafted, The figure is 14.5 x 12 x 21.5 cm (5-3/4 x 4-3/4 x 8-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kannon, also known as Guan-yin in Chinese or Avalokitasvara is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Generally shown as feminine or androgynous, she is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon.
Mashimizu Zoroku I ((Shimizu Tasaburo, 1822-1877) studied under his uncle Wake Kite and established his independent studio in 1843, taking the name Mashimizu Zoroku. He became independent in 1843 working along with Sen Soshitsu XI. His work was exhibited at the Vienna international exposition in 1873 and Philadelphia in 1876. Zoroku II (Jutaro,1861-1936) was born in the Gojo-zaka Pottery district of Kyoto and inherited the pottery tradition of his father, and, after his early death, continued under the guidance of his mother Chika, taking the name Zoroku in 1882. He was awarded at the Kyoto Kangyo Hakurankai Exposition. He colluded with some of the greatest artist of the day in reviving lost Japanese traditions such as Koyama Fujio and Arakawa Toyozo as well as being heavily involved in research into continental styles. He was a well regarded member of the city’s literatus, and is remembered for both his pottery and paintings in the Nanga tradition,
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1478869
The Kura
sold, thank you
A yobitsugi Jar made up of various excavated kiln shards of central Japan dating from the Heian period (794–1185). It is roughly 32 cm diameter, the same height. Looking at the volume of debris and encrustations, it is likely that the upper most part of this tsubo, which is one piece, was buried in a kiln collapse, earth and stone fusing to the molten ash. During the Heian period, hole kilns were dug into hillsides, with a chimney bored down into the back. Sometimes during firing, or after repeated use, the earth above would weaken and collapse upon the contents, burying all. Unusable, the site would be abandoned and another hole kiln dug alongside or at the next available site, leaving the shattered contents to be excavated a millennia later. Assembling these parts into Wabi-sabi jars or bowls became popular from the mid Edo period in a style known as Yobitsugi (literally called together and attached). To the contemporary viewer it is an example of the simple beauty of random effects produced by a wood-fired kiln as well as a unique view into the Japanese mindset of serenity found in the accidental and ephemeral.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1910 item #1493134 (stock #K017)
The Kura
$6,500.00
Sale Pending
A breathtaking box covered entirely in gold with geese taking flight beyond blossoming plum trees overhanging the waters edge. The flowers are in red and silver, the rest of the surface is powdered gold with kirigane inlay of cut squares of gold intimating lichen and shadow on the stones. The themes are repeated on all sides of the box. Inside fans emblazoned with seasonal flowers and pine boughs decorate the Nashiji surface. The box is 29 x 24 x 16 cm (just less than 12 x 10 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a lacquered wooden storage box, dating from the later Meiji to Taisho era.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491938 (stock #N17)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A vibrant image of a paradisaical island over which soar white cranes by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Horai Senkyo-zu. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name. It is performed with pigment on silk in a fine silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It is 145 x 65.5㎝ (57 x 26 inches) and is in excellent original condition. A similar scene on two six panel screens spread across 24 feet is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490730
The Kura
$1,500.00
A smoke tendril rises from the mouth of a bloated toad forming an Usubata flower basin in heavy olive patinated yellow bronze. The basin is 19.7 cm (7-3/4 inches) diameter, The entire 24.5 cm (9-3/4 inches) tall and it is in excellent condition. In Japanese the word for Frog is Kaeru, a homonym for: To Return. Thus the symbol of a frog means money going out will come back, a child growing up or a daughter marrying will come back to visit etc. Gama Sennin is one of the most depicted Sennin (Saints), a Daoist sage based on Liu Hai of ancient China. He has great magical powers and carries around on his back a large toad. In Chinese legend he learned all the secrets of Magic and the universe from the toad. Frogs have been known as a symbol of prosperity in ancient Chinese culture since time immemorial. As per Feng Shui, keeping frog figurines at home or in the office area, offers protection to the space and brings prosperity to one's life.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483360 (stock #MOR7073)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A splendid set of five Chataku Tea Cup Saucers of turned wood decorated in ridiculously thick lacquer floral decoration by Ikkokusai enclosed in a fine wooden box signed by the artist and dated Meiji 39 (1906). Accompanying is a note stating the set was received as a gift upon visiting the Naganuma Ryokan during a trip to Hiroshima in the fifth month of Meiji 43, accompanied by the name Kayanomiyasama. Kaya-no-miya were a collateral branch of the Japanese Imperial family. There is a photograph in the collection of the Hiroshima Peace Museum commemorating an Imperial visit (meeting school children) dated the fifth month of Meiji 43 taken in front of the Naganuma Ryokan. Each Chataku is 13.5 x 11 cm (5-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches) and all are in excellent condition, each uniquely signed on the base.
Ikkokusai I (1777-1852) was born in Ise, Mie prefecture, and was trained in the lacquer arts in Osaka. His talent was recognized and in 1811 he was taken as an official artist of the Tokugawa Clan, relatives of the Shogun and Feudal lords of Owari near present day Nagoya. All three of his sons would take the name Ikkokusai, His first son, (true name Nakamura Yoshiyuki), would settle in Osaka, and works he made were presented at the first National Industrial Art Exhibition (Naikoku Sangyo Hakurankai) in the early Meiji period. The third son (Sawagi Tsunesuke, 1822-1875) would remain and work in Nagoya until his death. The second son (Nakamura Issaku) would leave the Owari province to further his studies, traveling throughout Japan and developing the Takamorie technique of built up layers of lacquer creating nearly 3-dimensional works. He would become the carrier of the name, and after a sojourn in Hagi (Choshu), moved to Hiroshima in 1843 where he would pass on his techniques and experience to Kinoshita Kentaro (1829-1915). It was Kentaro who would officially become the third head of the family and who brought the name to the fore with his dedication to Takamorie lacquering. Kinjo Ikkokusai IV (1876-1961) continued to develop the method with new materials and designs. The family is currently under the 7th generation (b. 1965) who was named an important cultural property of Hiroshima Prefecture in 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1469625 (stock #OC064)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite porcelain vase decorated with a delicate depiction in over-glaze enamel of plum and bamboo by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gosai Bichiku-e Kabin (Vase with Plum and Bamboo in Five-Color Glaze). A rare work reflecting his roots in Kutani ware. It is 29.5 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.