The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1492641 (stock #K051)
The Kura
$2,100.00
The bird-faced Kami (god) Doryo Daigongen strikes a powerful pose astride the back of a mischievous white fox. Doryo is purported to have been an ascetic monk who turned himself into a Tengu when he vowed on his deathbed to protect the Mountain Temple Complex of Daiyuzen in modern day Kanagawa prefecture. This legend inspired a cult which rose to great prominence in the Edo period. To this cult the figure was the ward of Budo (martial arts). Originally this figure would have had feathered wings, which have been lost to time, and it is likely the soot encrusted figure was also once adorned in color and the fox was white, but that too has been all buried beneath centuries of soot from incense smoke. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall. There is some damage to his right hand, tip of the beak and foxes tail.
Tengu are mountain and forest goblins with both Shinto and Buddhist attributes. The patron of martial arts, the bird-like Tengu is a skilled warrior and mischief maker, especially prone to playing tricks on arrogant and vainglorious men, and to punishing those who willfully misuse knowledge and authority to gain fame or position. In Buddhist lore they came to be protectors of temples and defenders of the Dharma (Buddhist Law).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1486011
The Kura
$2,000.00
A lovely tray in the shape of a split lotus leaf by Ito Tetsugai enclosed in a period wooden box titled Sencha Shiki Habon. It is roughly 53 x 25 cm (20-1/2 x 10 inches), expertly carved to be incredibly thin. Trays like these were used as decorative objects in the service of steeped green tea, and were very popular from the Meiji through early Showa eras.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491424 (stock #N03)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A masterpiece painting by Shirakura Niho showing every aspect of his pre-war fame, lurid washes of color, wispy figures, a dreamlike allure, and hints at continental scenery. Here the foreground is dominated by a thatched hut, beyond which we see a single hazy figure twisting up in a narrow doorway beside twisting trees all like smoke rising to the sky. It is performed with ink and pigment on silk bordered in brass colored satin with rosewood rollers. It is 49.5 x 200 cm (19-1/2 x 79 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern wooden collectors box.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491425 (stock #N04)
The Kura
$2,000.00
This is a fabulous painting dated 1930 by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ko-Ten-Bo-Setsu (Twilight Snow in the Bay). Viewing it one can hear the silence, the soft pattering of snow and the flap of wings as geese take flight in the distance. Shirakura Niho was from Niigata prefecture, so was a man who not only knew snow well, but was well known for his snowy landscapes. The scene is performed in ink and light color with white gofun on silk in a patterned cloth border extended with beige and features rosewood rollers. The scroll measures 64.5 x 136.5 cm (25-1/4 x 54 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Niîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491724 (stock #N09)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A work so compositionally striking we chose it for the cover of the exhibition catalog by Shirakura Niho titled Baika Shoin Zu (The Plum Blossom Retreat). Pigment on silk in a silk border enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 55.5 x 127.5㎝ (21-3/4 x 50 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1492124 (stock #K036)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A hand formed silver vase with lacquered insert attached to a wooden base dating from the Art-deco era. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition. There is a small impression in the wood base, roughly 1 cm long, on one side. An accompanying card from the Nakano Zenkuro shop of Osaka has a simple 4 digit telephone number. Japan's influence on Art Deco was profound, shaping the movement's aesthetic vocabulary and contributing to its evolution as a global design phenomenon. Conversely, Art Deco left its mark on Japan, inspiring Japanese artists and designers to create innovative works that blended Western modernity with traditional Japanese craftsmanship, resulting in the distinctive style of Japanese Art Deco. The Japonisme movement of the late 19th century had already sparked Western fascination with Japanese art, culture, and design, paving the way for Japanese motifs and aesthetics to permeate international artistic trends, including Art Deco. One of the key influences on Art Deco was the emphasis on simplicity, asymmetry, and geometric patterns. Japanese woodblock prints, showcased bold graphic compositions and stylized representations of nature, which resonated with Art Deco's penchant for streamlined forms and dynamic imagery. Furthermore, the Japanese concept of "ma" or negative space, which emphasizes the importance of empty space in composition, had an impact on Art Deco's approach to spatial arrangement and balance.
Conversely, Art Deco also influenced Japanese art and design, particularly during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and the early Showa period (1926-1945). As Japan embraced modernization and Westernization, Art Deco became fashionable among Japanese artists, architects, and designers who sought to merge Western aesthetics with traditional Japanese sensibilities. Architects like Sakakura Yasui and designers like Shima Seien embraced Art Deco principles in their works, incorporating sleek lines, geometric patterns, and luxurious materials into their designs for buildings, furniture, textiles, and decorative objects. Moreover, the international exhibitions of the Art Deco era provided Japanese artists and designers with opportunities to showcase their work on the global stage, further disseminating Japanese Art Deco influences worldwide. Japanese lacquer-ware, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork adorned with Art Deco motifs became highly sought after by collectors and aficionados around the world.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491693 (stock #K004)
The Kura
$1,800.00
A second brilliant Modernist Vase by Yamamuro Hyakusei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Akatsuki (dawn). It is 24.5 cm (just les than 10 inches) diameter, 20cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist from the Showa to early Heisei eras. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Sale Pending
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1492640 (stock #K053)
The Kura
$1,750.00
A beautifully formed earthen flask from the Bizen region, the fire-buffed side still gleaming softly while opposite it has absorbed time into the porous clay. It comes enclosed in a box titled Ko Bizen Kaijo Ko-Tokkuri, inside the lid is annotated the dimensions and the dating Momoyama Jidai no Saku (Made in the Momoyama period) signed by the great Bizen connoisseur Katsura Matasaburo. It is 6.5 cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 13.5 cm (5-1/4 inches) tall and in overall fine condition.
Bizen boasts a rich cultural heritage as one of the Rokkoyo (six ancient kilns), originating in Okayama Prefecture, with a history spanning over a thousand years. Its traditional wood-fired kiln process imparts unique characteristics, resulting in earthy tones, rough textures, and distinctive natural ash glazes, prized for their rustic beauty and individuality. Moreover, Bizen ware embodies the ethos of wabi-sabi, celebrating imperfections and simplicity, resonating with collectors who appreciate the aesthetic of rustic charm and natural authenticity. Its timeless elegance and connection to Japanese tea ceremony culture further enhance its allure among pottery enthusiasts, making Bizen pottery a coveted addition to any collection.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1488519
The Kura
$1,700.00
Plums blossom red on the dark surface of this traditionally shaped Mizusashi bearing the rare Ubagamochi Stamp impressed into the clay of the base. It is 18 cm diameter, 15 cm tall, and comes in an old custom made collectors kiri-wood box labeled Ubagamochi Mimitsuki Mizusashi. It retains the original ceramic lid, as well as two lacquered lids, one a tsukuibuta lid in austere black, the other redish brown outside, gold within, featuring a raised image of a dragon flying through billowing clouds circling mount Fuji.
Ubagamochi is a rice cake popular in Kusatsu in Omi Province (modern Kusatsu City, Shiga Prefecture) and Ubagamochiyaki is a pottery made there. Legend has it that the owner of the Ubagamochi Chaya in this area founded a kiln in the mid 18th century.. originally making plates upon which to serve the famous Ubagamochi cakes, it expanded to tea ware purportedly under the 8th head of the family Segawa Kuniyoshi, who was a dedicated tea practitioner and close with the lords of Omi and Zeze Castle (which had its own pottery). This lasted through the 10th head of the family Kanazawa Kocho, who was also a fervent follower of tea. Unique Carved Hand Wooden Sculpture by Makino Koen Yay or Nay, stop or go, all good or hang on a second… .an intriguing wooden sculpture by Makino Koen of Niigata prefecture, a two sided hand carved from Japanese hardwood, one side gesturing with all fingers extended, the other joining the thumb and forefinger in an OK sign. It is 37 x 23 x 38 cm and in excellent condition, signed beneath.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1492443 (stock #Z092)
The Kura
$1,700.00
Love lasts beyond the grave, here a skeleton walks, her pate decorated with flowers and a bundle of daisies in her hand as she strolls grinning under the shade of a dilapidated umbrella held by an attendant, a poignant painting signed Shoken dating from the Taisho period (1922). The four character verse above is taken from the Lotus sutra (Hanya-Shingyo) and reads shikisokuzeku, meaning (loosely) all color is void, the void is all color. Completely restored in a chic Tsumugi cloth border with black lacquered wooden rollers, the scroll is 59 x 192 cm (23-1/2 x 75-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492594 (stock #Z084)
The Kura
$1,650.00
A Dojin licking Dango-treats dances in erratic dashes of soft wet lines and swift dark strokes of flying white on this vertical presentation by Edo period eccentric Doi Goga. Ink on paper it is 43 x 184.5 cm (17 x 72-1/2 inches) and has been completely remounted in dark silk with bone rollers. The creature clutches the raku-in stamp in his upper hand, the other stamps seem to follow his feet like footsteps. It comes enclosed in an age darkened wooden box. Known as the “Mad monk” Goga had a unique spontaneity to his work which was fresh and yet hearkened back to art of the great Zen masters. Of Doga Rhiannon Paget wrote “Characteristic of Goga's works are blunt, velvety black brushstrokes bleeding into the surrounding paper, exaggerated incidences of “flying white” (the streaking effect caused by a dry brush), paler strokes conveying depth, and perhaps most curiously, the incorporation of his seals into the pictorial space. This playful device was used sometimes in Japanese woodblock prints, but is rarely seen in painting”. Doi Goga (1818-1880) was a Confucian scholar of the late Edo to Meiji periods. He was born the son of a doctor serving the lords of Ise (modern Mie prefecture), home of the gods and Ise Shrine. A child prodigy, he studied under Ishikawa Chikugai and Saito Setsudo. The early death of his father saw him succeed the family head at the age of 12. He would serve later as a teacher in the official government school. He held strong opinions and was very critical of the hypocrisy and corruption he saw in military government and in Confucianism itself. His works began to see the light of day in the early Meiji period, however due to their inflammatory nature, much was left unpublished until after his death. Known for paintings of bamboo and landscapes, his Dojin figures are rare and highly sought.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1492703 (stock #K088)
The Kura
$1,650.00
An image of the white robed Kannon (Quanyin), Goddess of Mercy, by Mashimizu Zoroku dating from the early 20th century. Exquisitely crafted, The figure is 14.5 x 12 x 21.5 cm (5-3/4 x 4-3/4 x 8-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kannon, also known as Guan-yin in Chinese or Avalokitasvara is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Generally shown as feminine or androgynous, she is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon.
Mashimizu Zoroku I ((Shimizu Tasaburo, 1822-1877) studied under his uncle Wake Kite and established his independent studio in 1843, taking the name Mashimizu Zoroku. He became independent in 1843 working along with Sen Soshitsu XI. His work was exhibited at the Vienna international exposition in 1873 and Philadelphia in 1876. Zoroku II (Jutaro,1861-1936) was born in the Gojo-zaka Pottery district of Kyoto and inherited the pottery tradition of his father, and, after his early death, continued under the guidance of his mother Chika, taking the name Zoroku in 1882. He was awarded at the Kyoto Kangyo Hakurankai Exposition. He colluded with some of the greatest artist of the day in reviving lost Japanese traditions such as Koyama Fujio and Arakawa Toyozo as well as being heavily involved in research into continental styles. He was a well regarded member of the city’s literatus, and is remembered for both his pottery and paintings in the Nanga tradition,
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492517 (stock #Z095)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A deliciously horrifying painting of a ghost rising from the empty field dating from the 19th century completely remounted and ready to go for another century of leering from the shadows. Ink on paper with highlights of gofun and red pigment separated from a field of blue by a single narrow strand of red and gold Kinran silk terminating in dark wood rollers. The artist has sealed the panting with two crimson chops in the lower corner. The scroll is 42.7 x 196 cm (16-3/4 x 77 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, completely remounted.
For the Japanese Kaidan-banashi, or ghost stories, are a summer tradition. It is said that the telling of a ghost tale at night will cause the temperature in the room to fall, a great necessity during those boiling summer evenings. The ghosts and their associated skeletons have also long been subject in Buddhist art, with the emphasis on the brief nature of our lives in comparison to the cosmic void.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492597 (stock #Z086)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A skeleton sits among the dried grasses, alone and forgotten, perhaps reflecting on his life in this earie painting by Buddhist priest Higuchi Ryuon dated Meiji 6 (1873). Ink on paper, it is 41.5 x 179.5 cm (16-1/4 x 70-1/2 inches) and is in fine condition; completely remounted in a border of two subtle shades of black with colorful piping and features black lacquered rollers with mother of pearl flakes. It comes in a kiri-wood box.
Higuchi Ryuon (1800-1885) was a priest of the Jodo sect of Buddhism active from the later Edo through the Meiji periods. Born in Aizu (modern day Fukushima) he studied at the Higashi Honganji Takakura Gakuryo and served at Onjoji in Omi (modern day Shiga Prefecture) as well as Chishakkuin in Kyoto before becoming head priest of Enkoji Temple in Kyoto. He has recently come to attention when it was discovered he had a copy of the Bible in his personal effects.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492241 (stock #K047)
The Kura
$1,550.00
The surface of this black glazed bowl signed on the base Dohachi has been impressed all over with seals in a style known as In-chirashi. It comes in an ancient wooden box with ebony rim titled inside Dohachi Saku (Chirashi-in) Chawan, while outside a much-worn paper label reads In-chirashi Dohachi Saku Chawan. The original silk pouch, much deteriorated, is included, but no longer strong enough to hold the bowl. Without a box signed and sealed specifically by the artist, it is difficult to attribute to an individual Dohachi, but likely this is the second Ninnami Dohachi generation. The gourd shaped seal impressed into the side strongly resembles the gourd shaped Momoyama Seal of Ninnami Dohachi II. The bowl is 11 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I. Following the early death of his older brother he succeeded the family name, opening a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles. Along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. Ninnami Dohachi II and his son (the future Dohachi III) were invited by the local lord Matsudaira to produce pottery at the Sangama kiln in Sanuki Kuni on the island of Shikoku in 1832. He would return later, agan with his son as well as his apprentice Siefu Yohei, in 1852. The third generation (1811-1879) continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the annals of Kyoto ceramics well into the Meiji period. Takahashi Dohachi III began to use the title Kachutei Dohachi and was granted the title Hokyo by Ninaji-miya of the Imperial family. He retired to his grandfathers kiln in his later years, giving control to his son the fourth generation Dohachi (1845-1897) who also used the title Kachutei. The fifth generation (1869-1914) was adopted into the family and took head of the kiln in 1897 and was one of the top rated potters of his time, heavily influencing following generations including one of his top students, Ito Tozan. The kiln continues today with the 9th generation. The importance of the Dohachi workshop may be determined by the pair of vases held by the V&A (London) purchased in the 1870s under the orders: that they should 'make an historical collection of porcelain and pottery from the earliest period until the present time, to be formed in such a way as to give fully the history of the art. An exhibition was held at the Suntory Museum in 2014 centering on this artist, and he is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among many, many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
$1,500.00
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490730
The Kura
$1,500.00
A smoke tendril rises from the mouth of a bloated toad forming an Usubata flower basin in heavy olive patinated yellow bronze. The basin is 19.7 cm (7-3/4 inches) diameter, The entire 24.5 cm (9-3/4 inches) tall and it is in excellent condition. In Japanese the word for Frog is Kaeru, a homonym for: To Return. Thus the symbol of a frog means money going out will come back, a child growing up or a daughter marrying will come back to visit etc. Gama Sennin is one of the most depicted Sennin (Saints), a Daoist sage based on Liu Hai of ancient China. He has great magical powers and carries around on his back a large toad. In Chinese legend he learned all the secrets of Magic and the universe from the toad. Frogs have been known as a symbol of prosperity in ancient Chinese culture since time immemorial. As per Feng Shui, keeping frog figurines at home or in the office area, offers protection to the space and brings prosperity to one's life.