The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486054
The Kura
Price on Request
A spectacular Meiji to Taisho period Golden box decorated with a spray of flowers under an imperial Chrysanthemum. The interior and bottom are elegant Nashiji, and the border between box and lid is protected by a solid silver rim. Kirigane cut gold flakes decorate the raised leaves. It comes enclosed in a custom made kiri-wood storage box. The gilded receptacle is 30 x 24.5 x 14 cm (12 x 9-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches) and it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1800 item #1492274 (stock #K012)
The Kura
Price on Request
An incredible lacquered screen decorated with a Bugaku Dancer wearing an angry devil mask opposing a snake in incredibly thick relief opposite three gentlemen heating sake over a fire under the changing leaves of a maple, their oxcart off to the side. An inlaid cartouche near the snake reads Kan. The two-sided panel is set into a frame with matt black iron texture over a raw kiri-wood panel inset with three windows. It is 45 x 16.5 x 40.5 cm (18 x 6-1/2 x 16 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Haritsu Kenbyo. Off to the side a paper label gives a household collection number, and a further stamp shows it was recorded in an audit in Showa 14 (1939).
Ogawa Haritsu (1663-1747), also known as Ritsuo, one of the great individualists in the history of lacquer, was a poet as well as a painter, potter and lacquerer. Born into the samurai class, he renounced arms for the brush. In the 1680s, he became a disciple of the haiku poet Matsuo Basho (1644-1694). Haritsu turned to lacquer after 1707, the year his friends Hattori Ransetsu and Takarai Kikaku, both disciples of Basho, died. He adopted the art name Ritsuo, or "Old man in a torn bamboo hat," in 1712. The name suggests a poet or artist wandering carefree. A revival of interest in Haritsu's style and techniques during the 19th century is best exemplified in the copies of his work by Shibata Zeshin (1807-1891), the foremost Japanese lacquerer of the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1493375 (stock #K095)
A set of five covered pottery bowls by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Suimono Wan. The basic setting in Japanese food is Ichiju-Sansai or one soup, three dishes. So instead of mixing everything on one plate, each part of the meal is given its own dish. Suimono Wan are bowls for clear soup served between parts of the meal to cleanse the palette. These bowls are 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 8 cm tall. One bowl has a gold repair to the lid, otherwise they are all in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1491354
The Kura
$7,800.00
Pink and blue iris blossom among the green promise of Spring promised on this elegant vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in a wooden box annotated by the current head of the Makuzu Family in Kyoto, Makuzu Kosai. It is titled Yukasai Shobu no zu Kabin. It is 30.7 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1930 item #1492419 (stock #K006)
The Kura
$7,800.00
A masterpiece basket made from used split bamboo arrows by Maeda Chikubosai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Jidai Yadake-sei Hanamori (Basket made of Old Arrows) dated Showa 5 (1930). Hints of red and gold lacquer give clues to the origin of the bamboo shafts, making this an example of one of the most sought of all types of baskets by this elusive artist. It is roughly 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 49 cm (19 inches) tall and in excellent, original condition. Maeda Chikubosai I (1872-1950) was one of the most important bamboo artists working in the first half of the 20th century and was pivotal in promoting individual expression in the bamboo arts. Chikubosai I was from the Kansai Region and active in Sakai, Osaka prefecture. He was instructed by Wada Waichisai I (1851-1901). From 1912, he worked alongside Tanabe Chikuunsai I (1877-1937). Late in the Taisho era (1912-1926), he made presentation baskets on behalf of the Imperial Household. Chikubosai's bamboo flower baskets, in particular, gained widespread acclaim for their exquisite craftsmanship and elegant designs. He experimented with various weaving techniques, incorporating intricate patterns and textures to create visually stunning pieces that were both functional and decorative.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1940 item #1492918 (stock #K090)
The Kura
$4,900.00
A beautifully crafted basket by Tanabe Chikuunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hirokuchi Senshu-ami Hanakago (Wide Mouthed Senshu-weave Basket). It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 35 cm (14 inches) tall and retains the original bamboo insert. A similar basket is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489417
The Kura
$3,800.00
A pair of vases in the shape of old wooden well buckets (tsurube) in white glaze upon which is scrawled in beautiful grass scrip a poem by Otagaki Rengetsu. The poem reads: Yamazato wa
matsu no koe nomi
kiki nare te
kaze fuka nu hi wa
sabishikari keri
Which translates as:
Living deep in the mountains
I’ve grown fond
of the soughing pines
On days when the wind is still
how lonely it is
Each is roughly 15 cm (just under 6 inches) square 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall and both are in excellent condition. ).
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1487187
The Kura
$2,800.00
A beautifully crafted cast, carved, and parcel gilt bronze image of a samurai pulling back, arrow nocked, ready to let fly, signed in a metal cartouche on back Shunko-saku (made by Shunko). It is roughly 27.5 cm (11 inches) to the top of his hat, 25 cm (10 inches) from forefinger to elbow. The warrior is calm, determined, with a look of deep concentration in his inlaid eyes. He wears an eboshi, a formal type of hat, and is dressed in sumptuous, loose fitting robes with leggings and braces to protect his arms and legs. A short sword juts from his waist. The warrior's robes and pants feature large wagon wheel mon, known as genji guruma. The signed box identifies the figure as Minamoto no Tametomo (1139 - 1170) was a celebrated historical samurai of the Heian Period. Known for his impressive archery skills, he features as one of the epic warriors of the Hogen Rebellion, a precursor to the Genpei War. It is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489793
The Kura
$2,800.00
An unprecedented 19th century ceramic sculpture of a tumble of Shishi lions in a playful fight covered in unusual green-blue glaze. The Banko mark is impressed into the white clay of the base. It is very unusual to find large sculptures or works in Banko ware. This is 30 × 25 x 26.5 cm (12 x 10 x 10-1/2 inches) and in excellent condition. It comes in a box titled Okimono Banko-yaki Gyoku (Jade?) Shishi, with an inscription inside stating it was named a famous piece of the Shrine in July of 1920.
Banko ware began in the mid Edo period with the establishment of a small kiln in Kuwanocho, Mie prefecture, by the merchant, potter and Tea aficionado Nunami Rozan who stamped his works with his store name Banko. He studied in Kyoto and other regional kilns and created a name for himself in tea circles. The pottery died with Rozan, however was revived in the late Edo period specializing in Sencha tea ware and earthenware eating utensils.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1492680 (stock #K072)
The Kura
$2,700.00
A small Shigaraki pottery urn of very rough clay dating from the 16th century covered in thin natural ash glaze. The squat form known as Uzukumaru is very popular for its simplicity in Japanese Tea Aesthetics. About the shoulder is a lattice fence design engraved into the earth, otherwise it is unadorned and very humble. It is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter, roughly the same height enclosed in an ancient wooden storage box. There is an old age-darkened chip to the rim, otherwise is in surprisingly condition,
Appreciation of ancient Shigaraki pottery encapsulates a profound appreciation for imperfection, transience, and simplicity. Wabi-sabi cherishes the beauty found in the imperfect, the weathered, and the natural, fostering a sense of humility and acceptance. This philosophy values authenticity over artificial perfection, encouraging a deeper connection with nature and the passage of time. Similarly, the Japanese tea aesthetic, rooted in the tea ceremony's ritualistic practices, emphasizes harmony, respect, and tranquility. Together, they invite individuals to embrace the fleeting moments of life, finding solace and serenity in the subtle beauty of the everyday.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491692 (stock #K003)
The Kura
$2,600.00
A stellar modernist form with of cast bronze by Yamamuro Hyakusei in the form of a droplet splashing up as it hits the liquid surface. It is 25 cm (10 inches) diameter, 34.5cm (13-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in a custom kiri-wood collector’s box and is signed on the base Hyakusei.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist born in Toyama prefecture. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #1487190
The Kura
$2,500.00
A Hikeshi-Banten Fireman Jacket decorated with protective images of waves and birds outside in various dyed colors and sashiko stitching, the inside emblazoned with a dragon and tiger; symbols respectively of wisdom and protection (the dragon is a water god) and ferocity and bravery as the tiger knows no fear. The handmade coats were fashioned from several layers of highly absorbent quilted cotton fabric. They were then resist-dyed using the tsutsugaki method, which involved drawing rice-paste designs on the cloth, dyeing the cloth multiple times and then washing off the paste to reveal the layering of colors. They were worn plain side out and before firefighters entered the scene of a blaze, the coats were thoroughly soaked in water (they could weigh more than 75 pounds) to protect the men from burns and blunt the impact of falling objects as they went about their dangerous work. If firefighters were successful in extinguishing the blaze, they would turn their coats inside out and parade victoriously by cheering onlookers. According to the Denver Art Museum:
Decoration was important to firefighters’ garments, which were far from purely utilitarian uniforms. Firefighters enjoyed respect and high status in urban Japan, especially in Edo, where wood architecture and crowded living conditions led to frequent outbreaks of fire. Commoners wore reversible coats (hikeshi-banten) made of thick, quilted cotton fabric, with a plain indigo-dyed exterior and an elaborately decorated interior.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487331
The Kura
$2,500.00
A shard has been grafted into the side of this large misshapen Shino bottle dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period, the repair lined with gold. Gold also circle the neck where the discarded misfire was repaired, and gleams on the lip. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an age darkened wooden box titled Ko-Shino Tokkuri, Shoki no Kama (Old Shino Tokkuri, early Kiln era)
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. It is said that this technique was used as a sign of reconciliation between two warring factions during the Sengoku Period, the era of warfare surrounding the 1500s. It was common for the leaders of these factions to hold tea ceremonies with each other to negotiate peace. It is said that, when the negotiations were successful, yobitsugi was used to combine the tea sets used at the meeting where peace was decided.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1487484
The Kura
$2,500.00
A carved wood figure of a wandering priest, robes billowing in the wind, his large straw hat full of holes, signed Yasuchika on the back. Dating from the late Edo to Meiji period, it is by a member of the Tsuchiya Yasuchika lineage. The figure is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, complete with walking stick.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1492992 (stock #K086)
The Kura
$2,500.00
A lacquered writing box in the shape of a kimono sleeve (sode) covered in soaring silver and gold geese among autumn reeds and Togidashi clouds with a secondary (inner) sleeve shape covered in Karakusa vine tendrils on black enclosed in an age darkened kiri wood box. The inside is covered entirely in nashiji gold powder, and contains a grinding stone, and a water dropper of copper inset into the tray. Also enclosed are a bamboo brush and gilded ink stick decorated with a squirrel on a grapevine made by Koundo. The box is 22 x 15 x 3.5cm (8-1/2 x 6 x 1-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487185
The Kura
$2,400.00
A very large mask of heavily carved wood covered in black lacquer with golden eyes dating from the mid Edo period (18th century). There are minor losses to the lacquer on the cheeks and along the edges typical of age. It is 37.5 x 30 cm (14-1/2 x 12 inches) and is in overall fine condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1493059 (stock #K094)
The Kura
$2,300.00
An elegant vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan retaining the original wooden base enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seika Take-no-Zu Kabin. It is 16.5 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter, 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Furniture : Pre 1930 item #1491821 (stock #K044)
The Kura
$2,200.00
A fabulous Rootwood stand of dark red hardwood with a web of interlacing root-legs beneath. It is 48 x 32 x 8 cm (19 x 12-1/2 x 3 inches) and is in overall fine condition, dating from the first half of the 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1492641 (stock #K051)
The Kura
$2,100.00
The bird-faced Kami (god) Doryo Daigongen strikes a powerful pose astride the back of a mischievous white fox. Doryo is purported to have been an ascetic monk who turned himself into a Tengu when he vowed on his deathbed to protect the Mountain Temple Complex of Daiyuzen in modern day Kanagawa prefecture. This legend inspired a cult which rose to great prominence in the Edo period. To this cult the figure was the ward of Budo (martial arts). Originally this figure would have had feathered wings, which have been lost to time, and it is likely the soot encrusted figure was also once adorned in color and the fox was white, but that too has been all buried beneath centuries of soot from incense smoke. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall. There is some damage to his right hand, tip of the beak and foxes tail.
Tengu are mountain and forest goblins with both Shinto and Buddhist attributes. The patron of martial arts, the bird-like Tengu is a skilled warrior and mischief maker, especially prone to playing tricks on arrogant and vainglorious men, and to punishing those who willfully misuse knowledge and authority to gain fame or position. In Buddhist lore they came to be protectors of temples and defenders of the Dharma (Buddhist Law).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1486011
The Kura
$2,000.00
A lovely tray in the shape of a split lotus leaf by Ito Tetsugai enclosed in a period wooden box titled Sencha Shiki Habon. It is roughly 53 x 25 cm (20-1/2 x 10 inches), expertly carved to be incredibly thin. Trays like these were used as decorative objects in the service of steeped green tea, and were very popular from the Meiji through early Showa eras.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491424 (stock #N03)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A masterpiece painting by Shirakura Niho showing every aspect of his pre-war fame, lurid washes of color, wispy figures, a dreamlike allure, and hints at continental scenery. Here the foreground is dominated by a thatched hut, beyond which we see a single hazy figure twisting up in a narrow doorway beside twisting trees all like smoke rising to the sky. It is performed with ink and pigment on silk bordered in brass colored satin with rosewood rollers. It is 49.5 x 200 cm (19-1/2 x 79 inches) and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern wooden collectors box.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491425 (stock #N04)
The Kura
$2,000.00
This is a fabulous painting dated 1930 by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ko-Ten-Bo-Setsu (Twilight Snow in the Bay). Viewing it one can hear the silence, the soft pattering of snow and the flap of wings as geese take flight in the distance. Shirakura Niho was from Niigata prefecture, so was a man who not only knew snow well, but was well known for his snowy landscapes. The scene is performed in ink and light color with white gofun on silk in a patterned cloth border extended with beige and features rosewood rollers. The scroll measures 64.5 x 136.5 cm (25-1/4 x 54 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Niîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491724 (stock #N09)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A work so compositionally striking we chose it for the cover of the exhibition catalog by Shirakura Niho titled Baika Shoin Zu (The Plum Blossom Retreat). Pigment on silk in a silk border enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 55.5 x 127.5㎝ (21-3/4 x 50 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1492124 (stock #K036)
The Kura
$2,000.00
A hand formed silver vase with lacquered insert attached to a wooden base dating from the Art-deco era. It is 23 cm (9 inches) diameter, 21.5 cm (8-1/2 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition. There is a small impression in the wood base, roughly 1 cm long, on one side. An accompanying card from the Nakano Zenkuro shop of Osaka has a simple 4 digit telephone number. Japan's influence on Art Deco was profound, shaping the movement's aesthetic vocabulary and contributing to its evolution as a global design phenomenon. Conversely, Art Deco left its mark on Japan, inspiring Japanese artists and designers to create innovative works that blended Western modernity with traditional Japanese craftsmanship, resulting in the distinctive style of Japanese Art Deco. The Japonisme movement of the late 19th century had already sparked Western fascination with Japanese art, culture, and design, paving the way for Japanese motifs and aesthetics to permeate international artistic trends, including Art Deco. One of the key influences on Art Deco was the emphasis on simplicity, asymmetry, and geometric patterns. Japanese woodblock prints, showcased bold graphic compositions and stylized representations of nature, which resonated with Art Deco's penchant for streamlined forms and dynamic imagery. Furthermore, the Japanese concept of "ma" or negative space, which emphasizes the importance of empty space in composition, had an impact on Art Deco's approach to spatial arrangement and balance.
Conversely, Art Deco also influenced Japanese art and design, particularly during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and the early Showa period (1926-1945). As Japan embraced modernization and Westernization, Art Deco became fashionable among Japanese artists, architects, and designers who sought to merge Western aesthetics with traditional Japanese sensibilities. Architects like Sakakura Yasui and designers like Shima Seien embraced Art Deco principles in their works, incorporating sleek lines, geometric patterns, and luxurious materials into their designs for buildings, furniture, textiles, and decorative objects. Moreover, the international exhibitions of the Art Deco era provided Japanese artists and designers with opportunities to showcase their work on the global stage, further disseminating Japanese Art Deco influences worldwide. Japanese lacquer-ware, ceramics, textiles, and metalwork adorned with Art Deco motifs became highly sought after by collectors and aficionados around the world.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1491693 (stock #K004)
The Kura
$1,800.00
A second brilliant Modernist Vase by Yamamuro Hyakusei enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Akatsuki (dawn). It is 24.5 cm (just les than 10 inches) diameter, 20cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamuro Hyakusei (1900-1990) was a bronze casting artist from the Showa to early Heisei eras. After graduating from Toyama Prefectural Takaoka Crafts School in 1919, he entered Hattori Watch Shop, working his way up to head of the arts and crafts department. In 1958, he won the Art Academy Award for his Bronze Flat Footed Vase. After retiring in 1961, he devoted himself to casting metal. He exhibited with and later also served as a Nitten Juror. He died on October 31, 1990. 89 years old. Work by him is held in the Museum of Contemporary Art Tokyo and Chiba Prefectural Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1492991 (stock #K079)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Seasonal Grasses and flowers blossom all about the cream colored surface of this slightly belted vessel by Kiyoizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gohon Akigusa Mizusashi (Water Jar with Autumn Flora on Fawn-spotted Glaze). It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 14 cm tall (just less than 5 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1488519
The Kura
$1,700.00
Plums blossom red on the dark surface of this traditionally shaped Mizusashi bearing the rare Ubagamochi Stamp impressed into the clay of the base. It is 18 cm diameter, 15 cm tall, and comes in an old custom made collectors kiri-wood box labeled Ubagamochi Mimitsuki Mizusashi. It retains the original ceramic lid, as well as two lacquered lids, one a tsukuibuta lid in austere black, the other redish brown outside, gold within, featuring a raised image of a dragon flying through billowing clouds circling mount Fuji.
Ubagamochi is a rice cake popular in Kusatsu in Omi Province (modern Kusatsu City, Shiga Prefecture) and Ubagamochiyaki is a pottery made there. Legend has it that the owner of the Ubagamochi Chaya in this area founded a kiln in the mid 18th century.. originally making plates upon which to serve the famous Ubagamochi cakes, it expanded to tea ware purportedly under the 8th head of the family Segawa Kuniyoshi, who was a dedicated tea practitioner and close with the lords of Omi and Zeze Castle (which had its own pottery). This lasted through the 10th head of the family Kanazawa Kocho, who was also a fervent follower of tea. Unique Carved Hand Wooden Sculpture by Makino Koen Yay or Nay, stop or go, all good or hang on a second… .an intriguing wooden sculpture by Makino Koen of Niigata prefecture, a two sided hand carved from Japanese hardwood, one side gesturing with all fingers extended, the other joining the thumb and forefinger in an OK sign. It is 37 x 23 x 38 cm and in excellent condition, signed beneath.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1492443 (stock #Z092)
The Kura
$1,700.00
Love lasts beyond the grave, here a skeleton walks, her pate decorated with flowers and a bundle of daisies in her hand as she strolls grinning under the shade of a dilapidated umbrella held by an attendant, a poignant painting signed Shoken dating from the Taisho period (1922). The four character verse above is taken from the Lotus sutra (Hanya-Shingyo) and reads shikisokuzeku, meaning (loosely) all color is void, the void is all color. Completely restored in a chic Tsumugi cloth border with black lacquered wooden rollers, the scroll is 59 x 192 cm (23-1/2 x 75-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492594 (stock #Z084)
The Kura
$1,650.00
A Dojin licking Dango-treats dances in erratic dashes of soft wet lines and swift dark strokes of flying white on this vertical presentation by Edo period eccentric Doi Goga. Ink on paper it is 43 x 184.5 cm (17 x 72-1/2 inches) and has been completely remounted in dark silk with bone rollers. The creature clutches the raku-in stamp in his upper hand, the other stamps seem to follow his feet like footsteps. It comes enclosed in an age darkened wooden box. Known as the “Mad monk” Goga had a unique spontaneity to his work which was fresh and yet hearkened back to art of the great Zen masters. Of Doga Rhiannon Paget wrote “Characteristic of Goga's works are blunt, velvety black brushstrokes bleeding into the surrounding paper, exaggerated incidences of “flying white” (the streaking effect caused by a dry brush), paler strokes conveying depth, and perhaps most curiously, the incorporation of his seals into the pictorial space. This playful device was used sometimes in Japanese woodblock prints, but is rarely seen in painting”. Doi Goga (1818-1880) was a Confucian scholar of the late Edo to Meiji periods. He was born the son of a doctor serving the lords of Ise (modern Mie prefecture), home of the gods and Ise Shrine. A child prodigy, he studied under Ishikawa Chikugai and Saito Setsudo. The early death of his father saw him succeed the family head at the age of 12. He would serve later as a teacher in the official government school. He held strong opinions and was very critical of the hypocrisy and corruption he saw in military government and in Confucianism itself. His works began to see the light of day in the early Meiji period, however due to their inflammatory nature, much was left unpublished until after his death. Known for paintings of bamboo and landscapes, his Dojin figures are rare and highly sought.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1492703 (stock #K088)
The Kura
$1,650.00
An image of the white robed Kannon (Quanyin), Goddess of Mercy, by Mashimizu Zoroku dating from the early 20th century. Exquisitely crafted, The figure is 14.5 x 12 x 21.5 cm (5-3/4 x 4-3/4 x 8-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Kannon, also known as Guan-yin in Chinese or Avalokitasvara is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Generally shown as feminine or androgynous, she is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon.
Mashimizu Zoroku I ((Shimizu Tasaburo, 1822-1877) studied under his uncle Wake Kite and established his independent studio in 1843, taking the name Mashimizu Zoroku. He became independent in 1843 working along with Sen Soshitsu XI. His work was exhibited at the Vienna international exposition in 1873 and Philadelphia in 1876. Zoroku II (Jutaro,1861-1936) was born in the Gojo-zaka Pottery district of Kyoto and inherited the pottery tradition of his father, and, after his early death, continued under the guidance of his mother Chika, taking the name Zoroku in 1882. He was awarded at the Kyoto Kangyo Hakurankai Exposition. He colluded with some of the greatest artist of the day in reviving lost Japanese traditions such as Koyama Fujio and Arakawa Toyozo as well as being heavily involved in research into continental styles. He was a well regarded member of the city’s literatus, and is remembered for both his pottery and paintings in the Nanga tradition,
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492517 (stock #Z095)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A deliciously horrifying painting of a ghost rising from the empty field dating from the 19th century completely remounted and ready to go for another century of leering from the shadows. Ink on paper with highlights of gofun and red pigment separated from a field of blue by a single narrow strand of red and gold Kinran silk terminating in dark wood rollers. The artist has sealed the panting with two crimson chops in the lower corner. The scroll is 42.7 x 196 cm (16-3/4 x 77 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, completely remounted.
For the Japanese Kaidan-banashi, or ghost stories, are a summer tradition. It is said that the telling of a ghost tale at night will cause the temperature in the room to fall, a great necessity during those boiling summer evenings. The ghosts and their associated skeletons have also long been subject in Buddhist art, with the emphasis on the brief nature of our lives in comparison to the cosmic void.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492597 (stock #Z086)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A skeleton sits among the dried grasses, alone and forgotten, perhaps reflecting on his life in this earie painting by Buddhist priest Higuchi Ryuon dated Meiji 6 (1873). Ink on paper, it is 41.5 x 179.5 cm (16-1/4 x 70-1/2 inches) and is in fine condition; completely remounted in a border of two subtle shades of black with colorful piping and features black lacquered rollers with mother of pearl flakes. It comes in a kiri-wood box.
Higuchi Ryuon (1800-1885) was a priest of the Jodo sect of Buddhism active from the later Edo through the Meiji periods. Born in Aizu (modern day Fukushima) he studied at the Higashi Honganji Takakura Gakuryo and served at Onjoji in Omi (modern day Shiga Prefecture) as well as Chishakkuin in Kyoto before becoming head priest of Enkoji Temple in Kyoto. He has recently come to attention when it was discovered he had a copy of the Bible in his personal effects.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1492828 (stock #K069)
The Kura
$1,575.00
A fabulous large porcelain vase by Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppoo) complete with a rosewood base enclosed in the original signed and compartmentalized wooden box titled Konko-yu Semi Monkizami Kabin (Golden Yellow Glazed Vase inscribed with Cicada Patterns). The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The baluster form rises to frets in the shape of stylized cicada under a belt of archaic figures and yotsu-domoe (yin-yang) symbols. It is 21 cm (just more than 8 inches) diameter 36.5 cm (14-3/4 inches) tall plus the base and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492241 (stock #K047)
The Kura
$1,550.00
The surface of this black glazed bowl signed on the base Dohachi has been impressed all over with seals in a style known as In-chirashi. It comes in an ancient wooden box with ebony rim titled inside Dohachi Saku (Chirashi-in) Chawan, while outside a much-worn paper label reads In-chirashi Dohachi Saku Chawan. The original silk pouch, much deteriorated, is included, but no longer strong enough to hold the bowl. Without a box signed and sealed specifically by the artist, it is difficult to attribute to an individual Dohachi, but likely this is the second Ninnami Dohachi generation. The gourd shaped seal impressed into the side strongly resembles the gourd shaped Momoyama Seal of Ninnami Dohachi II. The bowl is 11 cm (4-1/2 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I. Following the early death of his older brother he succeeded the family name, opening a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles. Along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. Ninnami Dohachi II and his son (the future Dohachi III) were invited by the local lord Matsudaira to produce pottery at the Sangama kiln in Sanuki Kuni on the island of Shikoku in 1832. He would return later, agan with his son as well as his apprentice Siefu Yohei, in 1852. The third generation (1811-1879) continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the annals of Kyoto ceramics well into the Meiji period. Takahashi Dohachi III began to use the title Kachutei Dohachi and was granted the title Hokyo by Ninaji-miya of the Imperial family. He retired to his grandfathers kiln in his later years, giving control to his son the fourth generation Dohachi (1845-1897) who also used the title Kachutei. The fifth generation (1869-1914) was adopted into the family and took head of the kiln in 1897 and was one of the top rated potters of his time, heavily influencing following generations including one of his top students, Ito Tozan. The kiln continues today with the 9th generation. The importance of the Dohachi workshop may be determined by the pair of vases held by the V&A (London) purchased in the 1870s under the orders: that they should 'make an historical collection of porcelain and pottery from the earliest period until the present time, to be formed in such a way as to give fully the history of the art. An exhibition was held at the Suntory Museum in 2014 centering on this artist, and he is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among many, many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
$1,500.00
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490730
The Kura
$1,500.00
A smoke tendril rises from the mouth of a bloated toad forming an Usubata flower basin in heavy olive patinated yellow bronze. The basin is 19.7 cm (7-3/4 inches) diameter, The entire 24.5 cm (9-3/4 inches) tall and it is in excellent condition. In Japanese the word for Frog is Kaeru, a homonym for: To Return. Thus the symbol of a frog means money going out will come back, a child growing up or a daughter marrying will come back to visit etc. Gama Sennin is one of the most depicted Sennin (Saints), a Daoist sage based on Liu Hai of ancient China. He has great magical powers and carries around on his back a large toad. In Chinese legend he learned all the secrets of Magic and the universe from the toad. Frogs have been known as a symbol of prosperity in ancient Chinese culture since time immemorial. As per Feng Shui, keeping frog figurines at home or in the office area, offers protection to the space and brings prosperity to one's life.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1492337 (stock #K013)
The Kura
$1,500.00
A fabulous cabinet covered in polished black lacquer inlayed with mother of pearl designs in the style of Nagasaki containing various boxes, trays and dishes for an outing. To allow any steam to escape, it has windows which were once lined with silk. Brass hardware secures the hinged doors which swing out with small boxes and trays in one side, a square sake bottle with brass spout encased in a wooden stand on the other. The interior works are performed in clear lacquered hardwood grains and red lacquer with gold edging. Beneath a drawer slides out from either end, for chopsticks, napkins and other serving implements. The cabinet is 26.5 x 26.5 x 30 cm (10-1/2 x 10-1/2 x 12 inches) and is in overall surprisingly good condition. There are a few minor marks and indentations in the lacquer typical of use and although it originally contained five small red octagonal trays, only four remain.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1920 item #1490875
Bonji Sanskrit characters pierce the lotus finialed lid of this large antique bronze incense burner. The vajra-like finial topped in the shape of a lotus flower is hollow, the lotus seed pod pierced with holes to allow the smoke to escape like a chimney. This is also removable, slotting in to the incense burner, and turned to lock it in place. Inside the lid is stained and shiny from years of incense soot built up. It is 35.5 cm (14 inches) tall, 18 cm (7 inches) diameter and in overall excellent condition (a bit dusty in the photos as found).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491409 (stock #N01)
The Kura
$1,350.00
The sage gazes out from his hermitage clinging to the hillside upon a sparse scene of falling water and precipitous climbing peaks dominating this painting by Shirakura Niho dating from the prime of his career. Ink and light color on silk mounted in blue cloth with thin piping terminating in white ceramic rollers. It is 40.5 x 187.5 (16 x 74 inches) and is in excellent condition; enclosed in a modern wooden storage box. A published version of the Niho Catalog will accompany the work.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491463 (stock #N06)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A quintessential image of a tiny bean-shaped figure lost in thought, perhaps staring out to sea on a sunny hillock before cascading water in lush Spring-green washes by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Enpokihan (Distant Sails Returning). Ink & Light color on Silk in fresh green extended with beige featuring bone rollers. It is 64 x 143.5 cm (25 x 56-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491725 (stock #N10)
The Kura
$1,350.00
This scroll is an excellent example of the early Showa era style of Shirakura Niho centering around 1930 enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Teishu Sotai. The painting features two persons in a boat contemplating a precipitous waterfall which extends up through the clouds. The phrase Teishu Sotai in old Japanese translates to "meeting of moored boats" in English. It is often used metaphorically to describe a chance encounter or a meeting between two people who happen to be in the same place at the same time, similar to how two boats might meet while anchored or moored. It is 39.5 x 196 cm (15-1/2 x 77 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491726 (stock #N11)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A peaceful cluster of homes blanketed in snow by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kamo Sekkei (Kamo in Snow). This is likely an image from very close to the artists heart, he lived west of the Kamo River in Kyoto, and one can imagine this being one of the bridges spanning that river he has seen out on a winter day. Ink,Gofun & Light color on Silk bordered in light colored cloth. The scroll is 46.5 x 203.5 cm (18-1/4 x 80 inches) and is in overall excellent condition. Niho was from Niigata prefecture, where harsh winters are the norm, and he was well known for his winter imagery.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Fine Art : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491939 (stock #N18)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A lonely figure walks home through the forested hills, a rustic scene by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) from his mature period distinctly blending his early years of training in watercolor under Ishii Hakutei with his later Nanga years. Ink and light color on silk in a superb silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It comes in the original signed double wood box titled Kisho (returning home) and is in excellent condition. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493058 (stock #K097)
The Kura
$1,350.00
Polished layered-lacquer lozenges are inlayed into the surface of this fabulous Art-Deco era vase by important Japanese Bronze artist Yamamoto Junmin. The lacquered pieces have been cut and polished from variously colored layered lacquer. The vase is signed on the base Junmin, and measures 27.5 cm (11 inches) diameter, 18.5 cm (7-1/4 inches) tall. It is in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Junmin (1882 – 1962) learned the metal arts under Katori Hotsuma (Hozuma) and Asakura Fumio at the Tokyo University of Art. Living in Nara, the ancient capital, he was one of the finest metal workers of his age, carrying on the Edo-doki tradition through the early Showa era while also incorporating many ideas and innovations from Art Deco into hos oeuvre. His work was exhibited with the Teiten/Bunten National Exhibitions many times before the second world war, and with the Nitten National Exhibition post-war. The National Museum of Modern Art in Kyoto holds two works by this important bronze artist, as well as the Metal Art Museum Hikarinotani.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492827 (stock #K068)
The Kura
$1,250.00
A large porcelain vase by) Daimaru Hokuho (Hoppo) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Yellow Porcelain Lightning Pattern Vase. The vase is a perfect example of the Sinophile aesthetic that permeated Japanese art in the early 20th century. The simplified form rises to a row of alternating concentric lines known as Lightning pattern. It is 21 cm (8-1/2 inches) diameter 25 cm (10 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
Daimaru Hokuho (also called Hoppo, 1879-1959 ) would have been rated in the top 10 porcelain artist of Kyoto, along with Suwa Sozan, Ito Suiko, Ito Tozan, Miyanaga Tozan, Takahashi Dohachi, Seifu Yohei, Kiyomizu Rokubei, Miura Chikusen and Kiyomizu Zoroku, all artists active from the Meiji through the early Showa eras. He is best remembered for his Chinese forms and Sencha thin tea ware. Born in Ishikawa in 1879, he was initially trained in ceramic painting by Seishichi Okura at the Kutani Ceramic Company of the Kutani tradition before moving to Kyoto in 1899 to study porcelain throwing and decoration there. In 1906, he was invited to teach at the Hunan Ceramics Department in Hunan Province, China, and devoted himself to research on Chinese ceramics, returning to Japan where he took up residence again in Kyoto in 1909 and began making ceramics, mainly tea utensils and sencha utensils. He exhibited many works at exhibitions, receiving numerous accolades, and his works were purchased by the Imperial Household Agency. Daimaru Hokuho II (Tatsuo, b. 1926) studied under both his father as well as both Kiyomizu Rokubei V and VI. He exhibited frequently with the Nitten National Exhibition, where he would serve as a judge.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488518
The Kura
$1,200.00
A beautifully carved tray of overlapping leaves interspersed with clustered grapes by Ichikawa Shudo signed on back in a circular cartouche. In one corner an odd round tail leads us to a squirrel head popping through the leaves, as if one were looking up through the vines toward the sky. It is 46 x 35 x 3 cm (roughly 18 x 14 x 1 inches) and is in overall fine condition, There is a slight warp to the bottom of the tray, but it is still bery usable and there is no damage to the carving. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1489649
The Kura
$1,200.00
An E-karatsu Yobitsugi bowl made of various shards attached with wide bands of gold to a discarded base: the pieces dating from the Momoyama to early Edo periods. It is 22 x 20 x 6 cm 8-1/2 x 8 x 2-1/4 inches) and comes enclosed in a modern kiri-wood collectors box titled E-Karatsu Hachi.
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1490702
The Kura
$1,200.00
A classic vessel reflecting the grace of Song-Yuan period aesthetics by master of the genre Suwa Sozan II (Torako) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 25 cm (10 inches) tall and in excellent condition. A prime example of this early female Japanese potters work.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491426 (stock #N05)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A river runs past deeply forested hills populated by rooftops in this naïve ink painting reflecting the charm of rural Japan by Shirakura Niho. Ink on paper mounted in a green cloth border extended with beige featuring Shunkei nuri lacquered wooden rollers which would instantly call to mind the mountain village of Takayama, home of the Shunkei style. It is 52.5 x 116.5 cm (20-1/2 x 46 inches) and comes in the original signed wooden box titled Satoyama Fukei (Mountain Village Scenery).
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491465 (stock #N07)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A tiny figure sails on the placid lake depicted among exaggerated precipices of this early landscape by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Shunpu Taito. Ink & Light color on Silk, it is 59 x 130 cm (23-1/4 x 51 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491467 (stock #N08)
The Kura
$1,200.00
The ultimate in tranquility, a sage aloft his peak gazing out at the fresh green landscape, one can hear the rush of the falls in the distance, and occasional birdsong on the spring breeze. The painting is by Shirakura Niho and comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kankyo Chosen (Leisure Life at the Quiet Spring). Ink & Pigment on Silk, it is 54.5 x 134.5 cm (21-1/2 x 53 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1950 item #1491938 (stock #N17)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A vibrant image of a paradisaical island over which soar white cranes by Shirakura Kanyu (Niho) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Horai Senkyo-zu. This scroll is signed Kanyu, placing it in or after 1940 , when he changed his art name. It is performed with pigment on silk in a fine silk border with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). It is 145 x 65.5㎝ (57 x 26 inches) and is in excellent original condition. A similar scene on two six panel screens spread across 24 feet is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492224 (stock #K035)
The Kura
$1,150.00
The mouth of this vase opens like the thickly petaled chrysanthemum flower over a body decorated in thin blue with a roiling landscape of lakes and trees dotted with pavilions. It is an excellent example of the Hirado tradition in the 19th century. The vase is 14 cm (5-1/2 inches) diameter,28.8 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
The story of Hirado porcelain begins with the Matsura clan, who ruled over the Hirado domain during the Edo period (1603-1868). The feudal lord Matsura Takanobu, played a pivotal role in the development of the industry. In the early 17th century, Takanobu, inspired by the burgeoning popularity of continental ceramics, sought to establish a local porcelain production center on the island. To realize his vision, he invited Korean potters, renowned for their expertise in ceramic artistry, to migrate to Hirado and share their knowledge. This influx of Korean artisans infused the local ceramic industry with new techniques, designs, and aesthetic sensibilities. Under the guidance of these Korean masters, Hirado kilns began producing exquisite porcelain wares that reflected both Korean influences and indigenous Japanese artistic elements. The early Hirado pieces often featured delicate forms, refined decoration, and a distinctive creamy white glaze that set them apart from other ceramic styles of the time. Hirado porcelain quickly gained favor among the Japanese aristocracy and became highly sought after for its exceptional craftsmanship and aesthetic appeal. Throughout the Edo era, Hirado porcelain flourished, enjoying patronage from feudal lords, samurai elites, and wealthy merchants. The Matsura clan's support and encouragement further fueled the growth of the local ceramic industry, leading to innovations in techniques and designs. In fact one of the defining characteristics of Hirado porcelain was its ability to adapt and incorporate various influences while maintaining its distinct identity. While initially inspired by Korean and Chinese ceramics, Hirado porcelain gradually evolved its own unique style, blending elements of traditional Japanese aesthetics with innovative approaches to form and decoration. This fusion of influences contributed to the allure and enduring appeal of Hirado porcelain both domestically and internationally.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1960 item #1492125 (stock #K041)
The Kura
$1,100.00
A large vase decorated with an expansive ancient pine by Kawamoto Rekitei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 27 cm (10-3/4 inches) diameter, 29 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kawamoto Rekitei was born in Aichi prefecture, home of Seto-yaki and a long standing important production center for Japanese Sometsuke porcelains. In 1914, at the very young age of 20, he received the top prize at then National Ceramics Exhibition (Tojiki Hin Hyou Kai and later (1922) received the gold prize at the Peace Exposition. His works were featured at the Paris, San Francisco and Chicago World Expositions. He was contracted by the Japanese government in 1948 to create a vase for presentation to President Truman, and his work graces the collection of the Imperial Household. In 1972 he was named an Important Cultural Property of Aichi Prefecture (Ken Shitei Mukei Bunkazai). He was survived by his son, Kawamoto Goro, and grandson, Kawamoto Taro
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1492549 (stock #Z093)
The Kura
$1,000.00
A ghost rises from the darkness pulling on her hair, a wry grin as she looks sideways at the viewer on this antique painting by Moriwaki Unkei. Ink on paper completely cleaned and remounted in vine patterned blue silk with dark wood rollers. There are old age stains on the paper, which appear much stronger in the photos than in life. It is 40 x 200 cm (15-3/4 x 78-3/4 inches) and in excellent condition.
Moriwaki Unkei (1858-1946) was born in Tanakura-cho, Kawaetsu-han (Fukushima prefecture), in the final years of the Edo period. He studied Nanga, literati painting, then moved to Tokyo in 1899 where he helped found the Nihon Nansoga-kai painting organization. His works were shown at the Naikoku Hakurankai and Bunten National Exhibitions among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1491100 (stock #K007)
The Kura
$950.00
A crusty wood fired Bizen dish with looping handle, one hemisphere rounded, the other pinched as if for pouring, dating from the Edo period enclosed in an ancient custom fit lacquered Kiri-wood box. It is 23.5 x 22cm x 12.5 cm (roughly 9 inches diameter, 5 inches tall) and is in surprisingly excellent overall condition, with a few nicks to the edge of the foot consistent with age. Evidencing the centuries, there is a loss near the handle to some thicker glaze encrustation. This only happens with Bizen after a great deal of time. A dish like this would have been used for serving sweets in a tea room, or perhaps some skewered grilled fish in a traditional meal. The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The firing process allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Simplicity of form enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492548 (stock #Z094)
The Kura
$950.00
Long verses fall like rain upon the sinister figure of an Oni (type of devil) dressed in the habit of a priest who glares as he walks through the village, banging out a warning to all evil-doers. Around his neck hangs a bell which he clangs loudly with the hammer held high in one hand. The stern figure carries in the other hand a booklet titled Hogacho. A Hogacho is a record of the name and quantity of persons who donated (hoga) for projects such as the construction and repair of temples or shrines and the publication of scriptures. In the case of the Oni, his Hogacho records the sins and misdeeds of humans for payment in the after world. On his back is an umbrella. Ink on paper in a simple brown cloth border with highlights of Kinran gold in the Ichimonji above and below with dark lacquered wooden rollers like the shift of a priest moving to reveal the regal robes beneath. It is 39.7 x 179 cm (15-1/2 x 70-1/2 inches) and has been completely cleaned and remounted.
The Oni, often depicted as hulking, fearsome creatures with horns, sharp claws, and a menacing appearance, are a prominent feature in Japanese folklore, Buddhist lore, and broader Japanese culture. Their role and representation have evolved over time, encompassing a range of meanings and functions across different contexts.
In folklore, Oni are typically portrayed as malevolent spirits or demons representing chaos, destruction, and malevolence. They are often depicted as ogre-like beings with red or blue skin, wild hair, and tusks. They are known to cause mischief, bring calamities, and even consume human flesh. Oni are common antagonists in folktales, serving as the embodiment of evil and chaos. However, Oni can also have more nuanced roles. In some stories, they are not purely evil but rather more complex characters with a potential for redemption. Thus in Buddhist tradition, Oni take on additional layers of symbolism. They are often seen as the enforcers in hell (Jigoku), punishing the wicked for their sins. In this context, Oni are agents of karmic retribution, ensuring that sinners face the consequences of their actions. This role reinforces the moral lessons of Buddhism, emphasizing the importance of virtuous behavior to avoid suffering in the afterlife. Sometimes the concept of Oni in Buddhism is more metaphorical, representing inner demons or the obstacles one must overcome on the path to enlightenment. They symbolize inner struggles with the vices and negative emotions such as anger, greed, and ignorance that hinder spiritual progress.
In contemporary Japanese culture, Oni have become more multifaceted. They appear in various media, including literature, art, film, and video games, often with different interpretations. While they still retain their traditional fearsome attributes, they are sometimes depicted in a more humorous or sympathetic light. For example, the Oni character in the popular manga and anime "Dragon Ball" is portrayed as a bureaucratic worker in the afterlife, adding a humorous twist to their traditional role. They also feature prominently in cultural festivals such as Setsubun, celebrated on February 3rd during which people perform rituals to drive away evil spirits. One common practice is the throwing of roasted soybeans (mamemaki) while chanting "Oni wa soto, fuku wa uchi" ("Oni out, good fortune in"), which is meant to cleanse the home and welcome good luck.
The enduring presence and adaptability of the Oni in Japanese culture underscore their significance as both a reflection of societal values and a versatile symbol in the collective imagination.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1492677 (stock #K064)
The Kura
$950.00
A pair of masks representing the two variations of Tengu, the long nosed Tengu and the Karasu (Crow) Tengu mounted on a wooden placard dating from the Meiji period. Each mask is of carved and lacquered wood with inset glass eyes. The placard is 38cm (15 inches) wide 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and the masks are roughly 11 cm (4 inches plus) in depth. It looks as if the Karasu Tengu mask has had the eyes repaired, and they appear cloudy by comparison to those of the the long nosed partner.
The long-nosed and or Beaked Tengu is a mythical creature from Japanese folklore. Tengu are believed to be supernatural beings often depicted with human and bird-like features. They're known for their long noses, which can vary in length depending on the depiction. Tengu are often associated with mountain forests and are considered protectors of the mountains. They are known for their mischievous nature, martial arts prowess, and sometimes for teaching humans valuable lessons or skills. In Japanese culture, Tengu are a fascinating blend of reverence and fear, embodying both the spiritual and the natural worlds.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487575
The Kura
$900.00
A lovely chawan made of three separate excavated shards connected by lines of gold dating from the Kamakura to early Muromachi periods (13th to 14th centuries). It is 15.7 cm diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an old wooden box.