The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1481801
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite hand-formed koro, the tri-legged form hammered from a single sheet of copper gilded with gold and signed on the base Goro. The top is created in the same manner pierced with three holes, and it has an insert of the same alloy to keep heat away from the softly gleaming body. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Uchidashi is a traditional Japanese metalworking technique that involves hammering or embossing designs onto the surface of metal objects. This technique is often used to create intricate patterns, textures, and relief designs on various metal objects, such as armor. Taking it to the extreme, and entire three dimensional object such as a koro or animal figurine, can be hammered out from a single plate of metal. Uchidashi is a labor-intensive technique that requires a high level of skill, precision, and artistic creativity. It has been traditionally used in the creation of decorative and functional metal objects. This technique showcases the mastery of Japanese metal craftsmen and their ability to turn simple pieces of metal into intricate works of art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1481960
The Kura
sold, thank you
A looping handle sweeps above this fabulous bowl decorated with burgeoning gourds by Takahashi Dohachi VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 21 x 18 x 15 cm (8 x 7 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Takahashi Dohachi VI (1881-1941) was born the second son of the 4th generation Dohachi in Kyoto. He was too young to succeed the family name upon his fathers early demise, and a a potter named Ogawa Yunosuke steered the helm as the 5th Dohachi until he too passed away in 1914. Dohachi VI took over in 1915. A close compatriot of Kiyomizu Rokubei V and Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan II, his work was presented to the Showa Emperor at his coronation.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1483690
The Kura
sold, thank you
A classic mid 20th century Dry-lacquer vase by Kawai Masazo enclosed in the original signed wooden box. Rankaku (crushed egg shell) on cream colored lacquer alternating with highly polished black. This work truly encapsulates the freedom for form which artists were seeking in the post war period. It is 45 cm long and in excellent condition. Kawai Masazo was born in Osaka in 1928, graduating the Osaka Municipal School of Art and Design. In 1948, at just 20 years old, he was awarded the Mayors Prize at the Osaka Art Exhibition. In 1950 he was first accepted into the Nitten. He would relocate to Tokyo and continue to exhibit and be often awarded at the Nitten, including the Hokutosho in 1963 and 64 and would eventually serve as a juror there. He would also exhibit with the Gendai Kogeiten National Modern Crafts Exhibition where he would also garner several prizes and serve on the committee.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1485730
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Ko-Seto-yu Chaire Tea Container by Teishitsu Gigei-in Suwa Sozan I wrapped in a chord bound silk pouch enclosed in the original signed wooden box tied with deer leather, the box bearing the seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 5 cm (2 inches) tall and is in perfect condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1489169
The Kura
sold, thank you
Dragons charge the sides of this large water urn covered in crackled pale glaze emblazoned with a panel which specifies: Water for the 11 Faced Kannon (Quanyin). Inside is lined with iron glaze. Outside key frets surround the rim leading to a nearly flat shoulder upon which blossom five petaled plum flowers. Below this the dragons vie in the tempest, with the base drawing precipitously covered in Shipppo designs (7 treasures). It is 38 cm (15 inches) tall, 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) diameter. There are glaze losses to the rim, and a repair to a firing crack inside the rim (see close-up photos), otherwise is in excellent condition dating from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1489472
The Kura
sold, thank you
A small vase sculpted in the shape of a cluster of roses covered in cockscomb red by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The vase shows the influence of Art-Nouveau, and Rokubei was one of the leading proponents of blending Western and Eastern ideals in clay art. The vase is 6.5cm (2-1/2 inches) diameter, 18.5cm (7-1/2 inches) tall and in perfect condition. It comes wrapped in the original artist stamped cloth complete with the original black wood stand.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1491100 (stock #K007)
The Kura
$950.00
Sale Pending
A crusty wood fired Bizen dish with looping handle, one hemisphere rounded, the other pinched as if for pouring, dating from the Edo period enclosed in an ancient custom fit lacquered Kiri-wood box. It is 23.5 x 22cm x 12.5 cm (roughly 9 inches diameter, 5 inches tall) and is in surprisingly excellent overall condition, with a few nicks to the edge of the foot consistent with age. Evidencing the centuries, there is a loss near the handle to some thicker glaze encrustation. This only happens with Bizen after a great deal of time. A dish like this would have been used for serving sweets in a tea room, or perhaps some skewered grilled fish in a traditional meal. The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The firing process allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Simplicity of form enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1469252 (stock #OC066)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite set of small petaled-plates, each wafer thin, with a floral spray of yagiku (wild chrysanthemum) in a blue dial in the center by Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kiku-gata Kozara, Jukyaku (10 Chrysanthemum Shaped Small Dishes) dating from the 1920s. The design is Japanese, the decoration is strongly influenced by Korean wares. Each is 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan Torako was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1470026 (stock #MW011)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifuly formed iron sake kettle known as a Choshi with a solid silver lid and featuring sliver inlay designs on the handle enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood bos titled Tetsu Choshi Jungin-futa. It is 8 cm (just over 3 inches) diameter, 16 cm (6 inches) to the top of the handle, and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1470055 (stock #O005)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A solitary thatched hermitage rises on the top of this stony crag set onto a beautifully carved and signed rosewood stand. Together they are 7.5 x 11.5 x 13 cm (3 x 4-1/2 x 5 inches) and in excellent condition. The box is titled Yasegawa-ishi, inside signed Seicho and dated a fortunate day in the second month of 1936.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1473244 (stock #NW002)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A quintessential Iga vase dating from the Edo period, the rough clay covered in thick ash glaze. It is viciously charred, testament to the tempest in the kiln, with molten ash flowing freely over the surface. This is a perfect complement to a Japanese chashitsu tea room or traditional flower display. It is 24.5 cm (9-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. In a Japanese tea ceremony room, historically vases were made to match the ambiance of the humble setting. Although I did not write it: Starting in the Momoyama period (16th century), Mimitsuki Iga ware vases with characteristic "ear" lugs appeared. and thus became the popular norm. Since then the ears have become a mark of not only Iga flower vessels but also Mizusashi water jars. They were used as Japanese tea utensils under master Sen no Rikkyu and others. Old Iga ware, which is known as Ko-Iga, generally reflects Wabi-Sabi aesthetics with a rustic appearance and purposefully deformed shapes, given extra character by the addition of "ear" lugs and intentional gouges and dents.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1490628
The Kura
$900.00
Sale Pending
A beautiful ivory white vase in the shape of a handled-wooden-bucket, the outside wrapped with woven bamboo forming an outer bamboo basket shell, with the handle wrapped in bamboo rope. It is 42 cm (16 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Tobe-yaki Kabin signed by the maker. Inside the lid is an inscription stating the vase was received as a gift on the 6th day of the 11th month of Taisho 8 (1919).
Tobe-yaki originated in 1777 when Katō Yasutoki, 9th lord of the Ōzu Domain (1769–1787), started hiring potters from Hizen for production of white porcelain (hakuji). The area was long known for production of fine whetstones, and as the amount of whetstone deposits dried up, the waste was powdered for the making of pottery. During the Edo period (1603-1868), Tobe ware developed independently since there was limited information from other competing domains. After the abolition of the feudal system and the establishment of prefectures in 1871 it became possible to import technology from famous production areas such as Karatsu and Seto which led Tobe ware to expand rapidly. As technology started to make mass production possible, Tobe ware expanded its market into Southeast Asia. Then during the Taisho period (1912-1926) and Showa period (1926-1988), porcelain producing areas such as Seto increased their production volume by adopting modern technology like mechanical potter's wheels, leading the handicraft Tobe ware to stagnate. However, Yanagi Soetsu (1889-1961), one of the founders of the Mingei movement lauded its high quality technique, ensuring the tradition continue.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1472140 (stock #TCR7104)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Tiny repairs of gold glint along the rim of this misshapen wan-gata bowl from the Utsutsukawa tradition of Nagasaki. The bowl comes with a silk pouch enclosed in an old wooden box. There is a kutsuki on one side, where it adhered to something else in the kiln. The bowl is 12 x 10.5 x 6.5 cm (4-3/4 x 4-1/8 x 2-1/2 inches) and is in overall fine condition, dating from the 19th century.
Utsutsukawa-yaki originated in Nagasaki in the late 17th century. It is said it began when Tanaka Gyobusaemon opened a kiln around 1690. It is characterized by brown orange clay with a heavy iron content and was most often decorated with Brush strokes in white slip. Although at one time it was called the Ninsei of the West, the manufacture lasted only about 50 years due to the financial aspect of the clan, and it disappeared until the Meiji period, when there was an attempted revival, but that too failed to last. In modern times the art was revived by Yokoishi Gagyu, and has been named an important cultural property of Nagasaki Prefecture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1473297 (stock #MW010)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A rare iron hanging censer in the shape of a Mongolian Saddle Stirrup (Abumi) with silver mesh lid covering half the top. It comes in an age-darkened and worm-eaten kiri-wood box titled simply Tsuri Koro. The receptacle is 13.5 x 7 x 15 cm (5-1/2 x 3 x 6 inches) and is in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1490603
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A 19th century Bronze incense burner int eh shape of a burning Buddhist jewel supported on five legs of curling smoke tendrils, alternating with five looping handles. It is 20 cm (8 inches) tall to the finial, and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1494168 (stock #K403)
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A standing lion covered in running yellow bamboo ash glaze from the Edo period kilns of Takatori on the southern Isle of Kyushu. Head held high, the smoke would vent straight out of the creatures mouth, as if exhaling the fragrant tendrils. It is 14 x 10.5 x 20 cm and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern kiri-wood storage box.
Takatori-yaki, is a traditional style of Japanese pottery that originated in the early 17th century. It was developed in the town of Takatori (mod. Fukuoka Prefecture). Takatori-yaki is renowned for its unique and distinctive aesthetic, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy tones and running glaze. The history of Takatori pottery dates back to the beginning of the Edo period (1603-1868) when a Korean potter named Yi Sam-pyeong, also known as Ri Sampei in Japanese, settled in the area. Yi Sam-pyeong had been brought to Japan by the powerful daimyo (feudal lord) Hosokawa Tadaoki, who ruled over the Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture). Tadaoki was fascinated by Korean pottery and invited skilled potters from Korea to establish kilns in Japan, with Yi Sam-pyeong being one of them. Under the patronage of the Hosokawa family, Yi Sam-pyeong and his descendants established the Takatori kilns in the town of Takatori. Initially, the kilns produced pottery influenced by Korean styles, particularly the Buncheong and Ido wares. However, over time, they developed their own distinct style, blending Korean techniques with Japanese aesthetics. Takatori was highly prized by tea masters and samurai lords who appreciated its rustic charm and humble beauty. Takatori-yaki became an integral part of the tea ceremony culture, as its earthy tones and natural glazes were considered suitable for the serene and rustic atmosphere of tea houses.
Shishi guardians, also known as Komainu or "lion dogs," have a long history in Japanese art and culture; iconic figures often depicted in pairs and placed at the entrances of shrines, temples, and other important structures to ward off evil spirits and protect against negative energies. The origins of the Shishi can be found in ancient Chinese culture, specifically the mythical creature known as the "shi" or "foo dog" in English. These creatures were believed to have protective qualities and were commonly depicted in Chinese art and architecture. As Buddhism spread to Japan from China in the 6th century, so too did the imagery of the lion guardians. The artistic representation of Shishi lion guardians in Japan evolved into a unique style. The sculptures typically depict a pair of lion-like creatures with fierce expressions, large manes, and muscular bodies. One lion has an open mouth to represent the sound "ah," which is believed to expel negative energy, while the other has a closed mouth to represent the sound "um," which is believed to retain positive energy. This duality symbolizes the balance between yin and yang, and the harmony between opposing forces.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1494356 (stock #K401)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A wild design of three small bean shaped boxes enclosed in a dynamic long bean pod decorated with colored lacquer and mother of pear inlay by Nagai Yasuo. The outer box is 43 × 12 × 7.8 cm (17 inches long), the beans themselves are 9.5 × 6.5 × 5 cm (roughly 4 x 2-1/2 x 2 inches) and all is in excellent condition. These are made in the Kanshitsu or dry lacquer technique, whereby cloth is covered in layers of lacquer allowing for free form shapes limited only by the imagination. Nagai Yasuo was born in Aichi prefecture in 1945, and graduated the Takamatsu School of Crafts lacquer department in 1964, receiving top prize for his work. He began exhibiting with the Nihon Craft Ten (National Crafts Exhibition) in 1981, and three years running from 1981-1983 his work was featured in solo exhibitions at the Aichi Prefectural Museum. From 1983 he expanded to exhibit with the progressive Asahi Craft Exhibition. He earned gold at the 1989Takaoka Craft Competition. Nagai states: I consider "items for and inspiration from daily life" as the premise for my creations. From there, I explore the freedom of form achievable through kanshitsu.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1484141
The Kura
sold, thank you
Coxcomb decorates the deeply carved surface of this box covered in green and red lacquer outside, gilded with gold inside in the Kamakura-bori carving tradition. It is 22 x 25 x 5 cm and comes enclosed in a period wooden box. Kamakura-bori is a type of lacquer ware made in the area around the ancient capital city of Kamakura in Kanagawa prefecture. The tradition is based on carved lacquer wares imported from China during the Kamakura era. However, many Japanese lacquer craftsmen did not adopt the Chinese method of layering lacquer and then carving it; instead, they created Kamakura-bori, a method of carving wood and then coating the already prepared surface with lacquer. Initially, sculptors of Buddhist ritual implements and temple carpenters that were influenced by Chinese art works started to carve items made of Japanese Judas tree or ginkgo and applied a lacquer finish to the pieces in order to mass-produce Buddhist altar fittings resembling carved Chinese lacquer without the extensive drying time. This style came to be known as Kamakura-bori, or literally Kamakura Carving, and the adoption of traditional Japanese patterns made the technique unique to the island nation. Kamakura-bori features chisel markings left intentionally to accentuate patterned areas. Another unique technique is to sprinkle black ink on a vermilion lacquered surface, then polish down the highlights in order for the patterns to stand out from the darkened background. The carving and lacquering techniques of Kamakura-bori have evolved for the past 800 years. Today, production has spread to include everyday goods as well.