The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469664 (stock #OC071)
The Kura
sold, thank you
One of the most unusual pieces I have ever seen from this innovative artist, an octopus shaped Koro by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in seal of the Imperial Art Academy. The bulbous top of the head is removable along a line as if the creature were wearing a hachimaki head band, revealing the incense chamber within. It is 26.5 cm (10-1/2 inches) tall, 19.5 cm (roughly 8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1485958
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite lacquered box covered in gold powder prominently bearing the imperial crest given as a gift to Baron Nakamura Satoru in Meiji 44 (1911). According to the inside of the lid this box was created for the Meiji emperor and given in gratitude to the Baron for his support in creating the Keanfu memorial for fallen soldiers of the Russo-Japanese war. The box is an exquisite example of Imperial splendor featuring leaves tinged with kiri-gane gold inlay over powdered gold on a surface dusted with gold and blue-gold powder. It is 20.5 x 24.5 x 13.5 cm (10 x 8 x 5-1/2 inches) and in perfect condition.
Baron Nakamura Satoru (18 March 1854 – 29 January 1925) was a career soldier in the early Imperial Japanese Army, serving during the Russo-Japanese War, and was an aide-de-camp to Emperor Taishō. He was born the second son of a samurai of Hikone (present-day Shiga Prefecture). Joining the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army in July 1871, he was promoted to corporal in November 1873. After attending the Imperial Army Academy, he was commissioned second lieutenant in November 1874. He fought as an officer in the 2nd Brigade during the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877 then was assigned to the Imperial Army General Staff Office from March 1879. After promotion to Major he became a battalion commander with the 10th Infantry Regiment. He served as an instructor at the Army Staff College from December 1889. Nakamura was appointed aide-de-camp to the Crown Prince (the future Emperor Taishō) in December 1891, and promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1892. During the First Sino-Japanese War, he served as Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan from the end of October 1894 and was promoted to colonel in December of the same year. In April 1897, he was given command of the 46th Infantry Regiment, which served as a garrison force in Taiwan. He was promoted to major general in September 1899. From April 1900, he was chief-of-staff of the military bureau of the Governor-General of Taiwan. In March 1902, Nakamura was assigned command of the 2nd Brigade, which deployed to Manchuria in March 1904 as part of the Japanese Third Army at the start of the Russo-Japanese War. The unit served with distinction during the Battle of Nanshan. During the Siege of Port Arthur Nakamura led a force named the Shirodasukitai, after the distinctive white tasuki used for visibility and identification in the darkness of a pre-dawn attack. The Shirodasukitai assaulted the Russian fortifications three times, taking great casualties. Nakamura was himself wounded during the assault on the night of 26 November 1904, during which most of his 4,500 man unit was annihilated with no significant result.
He continued in command positions and in September 1907, he was made a baron (danshaku) in the kazoku peerage system. At the end of December 1908, he was once again Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan. In September 1914, he served as resident-general of the Kwantung Leased Territory. In January 1915, he was promoted to full general. During World War I he was appointed to sit the Supreme War Council in 1917. On his death, he was posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1489964 (stock #OC010)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A very large porcelain basin decorated with gold and red fish among green, gold and red flora by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gosu-Aka-e Sakana no Zu Hira Bachi. Inside the box bears the Teishitsu Gigein seal, followed by an annotation denoting the artist age at 75 years old. After a long verse which also appears to be by the hand of Kozan it is dated 5th day, 5th month of Taisho 6 (1917). It is 38 cm (15 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469135 (stock #L013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Layer upon layer of lacquer has been carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the surface in a style known as Guri by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in a wooden box titled Guri Kobon. It is 23 x 33 cm (9 x 13 inches) and in excellent condition, the artist seal inlayed in mother of pearl beneath. The box is annotated by his adopted daughter and heir Torako (Suwa Sozan II).
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469372 (stock #L016)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A large table made of layers of lacquer carved through to reveal the various colors by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Guri Joku and bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in Seal of the Imperial Art Academy. It is 65 x 40.5 x 20 cm (25-1/2 x 16 x 8 inches) and is in excellent condition. The artists seal is expertly incised into the back of one ball shaped foot.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1489085
The Kura
sold, thank you
Startled to enlightenment, this is a large Edo period figure of a Rakan (Sanskrit: Arhat), a Buddhist saint kozutsucarved in the Yosegi-zaiku method of joined blocks of wood. Originally covered in polychrome colors, much has grayed and flaked away with time, a fitting aspect of the image. He has glass eyes which seem to burn violently with realization. The image is 43 x 36 x 51 cm (17 x 14 x 20 inches) and is in solid condition. The head is removable, slotted into the body at the collar. For additional images please inquire. In Buddhist lore the Rakan is one who has broken the chain of re-birth and overcome the three poisons of desire, hatred and ignorance. It is a popular theme in both Chinese and Japanese art. According to the Met: Rakan are ascetics who guard and proclaim Buddhist law on earth in the period between the death of Shakyamuni, the historical Buddha, and the coming of Maitreya, the Buddha of the Future. They have inspired some of the freest and most lively depictions of the human figure in Japanese art. Age and the struggle for salvation have left their mark, but in the figures’ gnarled faces and bodies is a strong expression of the uniqueness of each individual. Because Rakan achieved enlightenment through rigorous individual effort and meditation, they appealed to practitioners of Zen Buddhism and became a popular icon in medieval Japan. They are conventionally portrayed in groups of sixteen…
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1469625 (stock #OC064)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite porcelain vase decorated with a delicate depiction in over-glaze enamel of plum and bamboo by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Gosai Bichiku-e Kabin (Vase with Plum and Bamboo in Five-Color Glaze). A rare work reflecting his roots in Kutani ware. It is 29.5 cm (11-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1470340 (stock #OC046)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An iconic work with dynamic floral pattern in pale white on pink by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taireiji Ichirinsashi. It is 19.5 cm (7-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The vase retains the original wood stand and stamped cloth pouch. Undeniably Taireiji was the most important development by this innovative artist, and pieces are exceedingly rare.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1491782 (stock #N13-16)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of four large scrolls depicting seasonal landscapes by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed double wood box exhibited at the 1936 Nangain-Ten and published in the book Shirakura Niho (page 127 figures 102-107). Ink & Light color on Paper in fine silk mountings, they have been completely cleaned and restored to original perfect condition retaining the original cloth by Kitaoka Hyboido of Kyoto. Each scroll is 66 x 138.5 cm (26 x 54-1/2 inches). A copy of the museum book and our catalog will accompany the set.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1489008
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of three Chin puppies by Miyagwa (Makuzu) Kozan II published in the book Miyagawa Kozan and the World of Makuzu Ware (Yokohama Museum of Art, 2001) page 144, figure 174. They are roughly 5 x 10 cm (2 x 4 inches) and in excellent condition. They come enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1700 item #1489585
The Kura
Sale Pending
A classic Nanban style Japanese lacquer tray decorated with mother of pearl inlay featuring four panels of birds among floral patterns separated by bands and frets dating from the 17th century later Momoyama to early Edo era. It is 43 × 28.5 x 2cm (17 x 11 x 1 inches). It has been fully restored, with repairs to the original lacquer and inlay, and the underside has been re-lacquered. It comes in a custom fitted Chinese style cloth bound box lined with red silk.
According to the Met: The Portuguese and Spanish who visited Japan during the Momoyama period were fascinated by the beauty and exotic appearance of luxurious gold-decorated lacquerwares associated with the taste of warlord Toyotomi Hideyoshi (1537–1598). As a result, lacquers commissioned for the European market typically adopted this flamboyant style (Kōdaiji maki-e). Such pieces—among the earliest trade goods exported from Japan—are known collectively as “Nanban,” or “Southern Barbarian,” the Japanese appellation for foreigners who arrived “from the south.” Highly prized by the great families of Europe as luxurious exotica, they helped to define a “Japan aesthetic” for the Continent for more than three centuries. The decorative patterns depict Japanese subjects, among others, including maple, mandarin orange, and cherry trees, camellia flowers, wisteria branches, and birds. The decorative bands of the borders are embellished with geometric designs. One of the characteristic features of the Nanban lacquers is the rich application of mother-of-pearl inlays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Wood : Pre 1700 item #1482362
The Kura
sold, thank you
A startling find! A Horned Demon mask dating from the Nanboku-cho to earlier Muromachi eras (14th to 15th centuries) carved from a single block of wood and enclosed in an ancient kiri-wood box. The visage would have once sported a lower jaw, likely suspended by chord, which is no longer extant. It is 21 x 15 x 9 cm (8-1/4 x 6 x 3-13/4 inches) and is in overall fine condition, exuding a great sense of age.
Oni Masks: Oni are a type of horned demon or ogre in Japanese folklore. They are often depicted with fierce expressions, sharp teeth, and horns on their foreheads. Oni masks were commonly used in various traditional Japanese performing arts, including Noh theater, Kyogen (a comedic theater form), and festivals. In Noh and Kyogen plays, Oni characters represented malevolent supernatural beings or disruptive forces. Oni masks were crafted with variations in color and design to represent different types of Oni with distinct personalities and roles in performances.
Horned demons and monstrous beings have been a recurring theme in various art forms and folklore throughout Japanese history. The Hannya mask, with its distinctive design and association with the Noh theater, is one of the most iconic representations of a horned demon in Japanese culture. However, it is just one of the many examples of horned demon imagery that has been present in Japanese artistry throughout history.
The term "Hannya" refers to a vengeful female spirit or demon, often depicted as a hideous and tormented being with sharp fangs and a horned, demonic visage. The character of the Hannya is prevalent in Noh theater, a traditional form of Japanese drama that dates back to the 14th century. Hannya is often portrayed as a woman who transforms into a demon due to overwhelming jealousy, rage, or sorrow. The transformation occurs after experiencing intense emotional pain, particularly from unrequited love or betrayal. As a result, the Hannya's soul becomes consumed by negative emotions, leading to her metamorphosis into a malevolent, otherworldly creature. The Hannya mask is a distinctive and iconic representation of this character. It features a fearsome expression with bulging, angry eyes, a long nose, sharp fangs, and two sharp, upward-curving horns on the forehead. The mask is crafted to express a complex range of emotions, capturing the Hannya's torment, grief, and anger.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1483318
The Kura
sold, thank you
A lacquered cabinet for storing Tea accoutrements by Koyama Kogetsu enclosed in the original signed wooden box dated 1931 and titled Tsukiyama Maki-e Kikkyoku (Mon and Hills Maki-e Tea Cabinet). On the door deer stand on the edge of a glade, gold, lead and Raden (mother of pearl) trees with branches of gold and silver maki-e above. The door lifts off to reveal the silver disc of a full moon rising over evening hills. It is signed in gold Kogetsu. The cabinet is 36 x 28 x 39 cm (11 x 14 x 15-1/2 inches) and is in excellent condition. Koyama Kogetsu (Rokuro, 1884-1937) was a Maki-e artist from Kashwaski City born the son of Koyama Kinpei (Tesse). He studied the art of Maki-e under Kawanobe Iccho and Uematsu Homin. His work was exhibited at the Teiten National Art Exhibition and awarded at the Imperial Crafts Exhibition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483360 (stock #MOR7073)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A splendid set of five Chataku Tea Cup Saucers of turned wood decorated in ridiculously thick lacquer floral decoration by Ikkokusai enclosed in a fine wooden box signed by the artist and dated Meiji 39 (1906). Accompanying is a note stating the set was received as a gift upon visiting the Naganuma Ryokan during a trip to Hiroshima in the fifth month of Meiji 43, accompanied by the name Kayanomiyasama. Kaya-no-miya were a collateral branch of the Japanese Imperial family. There is a photograph in the collection of the Hiroshima Peace Museum commemorating an Imperial visit (meeting school children) dated the fifth month of Meiji 43 taken in front of the Naganuma Ryokan. Each Chataku is 13.5 x 11 cm (5-1/4 x 4-1/4 inches) and all are in excellent condition, each uniquely signed on the base.
Ikkokusai I (1777-1852) was born in Ise, Mie prefecture, and was trained in the lacquer arts in Osaka. His talent was recognized and in 1811 he was taken as an official artist of the Tokugawa Clan, relatives of the Shogun and Feudal lords of Owari near present day Nagoya. All three of his sons would take the name Ikkokusai, His first son, (true name Nakamura Yoshiyuki), would settle in Osaka, and works he made were presented at the first National Industrial Art Exhibition (Naikoku Sangyo Hakurankai) in the early Meiji period. The third son (Sawagi Tsunesuke, 1822-1875) would remain and work in Nagoya until his death. The second son (Nakamura Issaku) would leave the Owari province to further his studies, traveling throughout Japan and developing the Takamorie technique of built up layers of lacquer creating nearly 3-dimensional works. He would become the carrier of the name, and after a sojourn in Hagi (Choshu), moved to Hiroshima in 1843 where he would pass on his techniques and experience to Kinoshita Kentaro (1829-1915). It was Kentaro who would officially become the third head of the family and who brought the name to the fore with his dedication to Takamorie lacquering. Kinjo Ikkokusai IV (1876-1961) continued to develop the method with new materials and designs. The family is currently under the 7th generation (b. 1965) who was named an important cultural property of Hiroshima Prefecture in 2011.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1910 item #1474794 (stock #OC004)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gold dragons prance about the vermillion surface of this exquisite vessel by important Meiji potter Eiraku Zengoro XIV (Tokuzen) enclosed in the original signed wooden box which is in turn enclosed in an outer box also annotated by a later generation Eiraku. Remembered specifically for his mastery of Aka-e Kinsai ware, this is a museum worthy example of this important potters work. It is 43 cm (17 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Eiraku Tokuzen (Eiraku Zengoro XIV, 1853-1909) was born the first son of the 12th generation Eiraku Wazen He was named the 14th Zengoro at the age of 18 in 1871. This was only a couple years after the Fall of the Shogunate and restoration of the Meiji emperor, a hard time for potters specializing in Tea ware, which was experiencing a backlash as did many things associated with what had been traditional societal ranking and privilege. However Tokuzen worked hard to both maintain ties with the tea world, while making efforts to embrace a global audience. In 1873 Eiraku wares were exhibited at the Vienna World Exposition, and in 1876, Philadelphia, then Paris in 1878. At the same time new approaches to pottery pioneered by Eiraku were exhibited at the 1875 Kyoto Hakurankai in the cultural heartland of Japan. In 1882 he opened in a new Kiln in the Eastern hills called the Kikutani Kiln (Valley of Chrysanthemum) specializing in high end tea ware for both Maccha and Sencha teas, while expanding into daily wares for the growing middle class.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1482621
The Kura
sold, thank you
A hawk rests on an elaborate perch, the feathers fluffed up, each uniquely carved on this rare okimono from the Mushiake kilns of Okayama prefecture. It comes in an ancient kiri-wood box. The notation on the side of the box states it was received in late Meiji 27 (1894) from the former Head of the Okayama fief Ikeda Mochimasa. The name of the recipient has been redacted, as is often the case when things change hands in Japan. It is 24 x 7.4 x 29 cm (9 x 3 x 11-1/2 inches). A ringlet on one side and a hook under the bar, both made of wire-thin clay, have been broken off, otherwise it is in excellent condition. A work like this from Mushiake is unprecedented, a true rarity.
Mushiake ware is pottery made in modern day Setouchi City, Okayama Prefecture. Legend states it was begun as the Niwa-yaki (a private samurai residence kiln) by the Igi Family, chief retainer of the Okayama Domain. The kiln origin is unknown, but possible originated with the 6th head of the Igi family, and was certainly active in the Bunka/Bunsei eras at the opening of the 19th century. It is said the third generation Dohachi fired work there. The kiln was shut down in 1842, but five years later revitalized by the 14th-generation head of the Igi family, Igi Tadazumi (Sanensai, 1818–1886,), who was a well-known tea master. He invited Seifu Yohei (1803–1861) who came to the kiln and taught blue and white pottery techniques, Korean and other traditions popular in the capitol at the time. At the end of the Edo period (Bunkyu era) Mori Kakutaro took over operations at the kiln. In the early Meiji era Miyagawa Kozan came to work at the kiln, and it is said Kakutaro’s son Hikoichiro took the character Ko from Kozan for his own pseudonym Mori Koshu. Once again, during the Meiji era, the kiln shut down temporarily, and Hikoichiro (now known as Koshu) went to Yokohama to learn new pottery techniques from Kozan. The kiln enjoyed some success during this era, but was again shut down eventually, and revived in 1932. It is still in existence today.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1488700 (stock #OC017)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A handle surmounts the peak of this beautifully rendered vase by Myagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Sometsuke Te-oke-gata Kabin (Celadon Handled Bucket Shaped Vase with Blue and White Design). It is 16 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32.5 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1920 item #1474626
The Kura
sold, thank you
A black bird sporting a tufted beak shelters among the thick foliage of fresh bamboo by the easily identifiable and quite rare artist Sakakibara Shiho performed with pigment on silk in the original signed double wood box titled Mosochiku Hakkacho (Crested Myna Bird in Moso Bamboo), a favorite motif by the artist dating from the Taisho period. It is bordered in fine pattered silk threaded with gold and is appointed with solid ivory rollers (these will be changed if exporting). A major work, the scroll is 55.5 x 222.5 cm (inches) and in overall fine condition.
Sakakibara Shiho (1887 – 1971) was born in Kyoto and studied traditional Japanese painting at the Kyoto City School of Arts and Crafts, graduating in 1907, then moved on to the Kyoto Municipal School of Painting (mod University of Art). While at the school, his works were accepted (1909) and awarded (1911) into the Bunten National Exhibition. He graduated there in 1913. With his radical style garnering disapproval in official circles, in 1918, along with Tsuchida Bakusen, Irie Hakko, Ono Chikkyo and Murakami Kagaku founded the Kokuga Sosaku Kyokai. The organization changed its name to the Kokugakai in 1928, the same year Shiho took a position at his alma mater where he was awarded a professorship in 1937. He was awarded for his life’s work by the Nihon Geijutsu-in (Japan Art Academy) in 1962. Happily, the Kokuga-kai has outlived its founders, and is still exhibiting annually to this day. Works are held in the collections of the Seattle Art Museum, The Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art, the Adachi Museum as well as the Otani memorial Art Museum among others.