The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1485802
The Kura
$800.00
Lavender and aquamarine coat the surface of this vase from the Kairakuen Kilns of the Ki branch of the Tokugawa family dating from the 19th century. The circular window between floral scrolls is made in the shape of the archaic character Kotobuki. The vase is 18 cm (7 inches) tall and in excellent condition, and bears the Kairakuen seal impressed into the base. It comes enclosed in an old kiri-wood collectors box titled Kairakuen-ki Juji Moyo Kabin (Kairakuen Vessel decorated with Character of fortune).
The Kairakuen kiln was the "garden kiln" sponsored by the Kii branch of the Tokugawa house, in modern day Wakayama founded in 1819. It operated irregularly, drawing upon the services of potters from various Kyoto workshops including the 9th and 10th Omotesenkei Heads Ryoryosai (1775-1825) and Kyukosai (1818-1860), 10th Raku Master Raku Tanyu (1795-1854), and Eiraku Zengoro XI (Nishimura Hozen, 1795–1854) among others . Kairakuen products reflect a marked revival of interest in Chinese ceramics in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. This vase, with its restrained shape and overall turquoise enamel glaze, follows Qing [Ch'ing] dynasty ceramic models. The design of the four-character mark, "Made at Kairakuen," imitates enamel four-character seals appearing on Qing [Ch'ing] imperial wares.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1485948
The Kura
sold, thank you
A rare large vase by Kanzan Denshichi decorated with a hermitage in the hills and a poem extolling the beauty of summers first rain by Kanzan Denshichi enclosed in the original signed wooden box bearing the Shountei seal, dating it between 1871 and 1890. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kanzan Denshichi (1821-1890) was born in the ceramic-producing area of Seto. He worked at the Koto kiln of the Ii family in the Hikone domain, moving to Kyoto when the kiln closed in 1862. In Kyoto, he established his workshop at the base of Kiyomizu-zaka where he worked under the name Terao Denshichi and is thought to have been one of the first ceramicists in Kyoto to specialize specifically in porcelain. In the first year of the Meiji era (1868) he worked to supply the Kyoto Prefectural Office, following which he studied Western painting and pottery decoration under Gottfried Wagner. In the following three years, production was renamed Shountei and he worked under the name Kato Kanzan. Kanzan’s works include porcelain tableware, both Western and Japanese in style, often decorated with brightly colored polychrome and gold. Some of these wares were made for export, and Kanzan also exhibited at international exhibitions, securing a gold medal at Paris in 1878 In 1881 during their visit to Japan, Queen Victoria’s grandsons: Prince Albert Victor, Duke of Clarence and Avondale, and Prince George, Duke of York (George V), visited Kanzan’s workshop in Kyoto. The Imperial Household Ministry purchased Kanzan’s works, including some tableware for use in the Enriokan and other items in the style of the underglaze blue decorated Edo-period imperial porcelains known as kinri goyōtōki.
Pieces by Kanzan may be found in the collections of the Sannomaru Shōzōkan (Museum of the Imperial Collections) and Imperial Banqueting Department of Japan’s Imperial Household Agency, Tokyo National Museum and Kyoto Prefectural Library and Archives. The Victoria and Albert Museum has a pair of vases displayed at the Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition of 1876, a pair of ginger jars and four other small pieces. In 2014, the Sannomaru Shōzōkan devoted an exhibition to a Japanese-style polychrome dinner service made by Kanzan’s workshop for Prince Arisugawa Takehito: Beautiful Modern Kyoyaki (Kyoto-style ware) – Fine works by Kanzan Denshichi passed down within the Prince Arisugawa Family, 21 March – 22 June 2014.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1485950
The Kura
sold, thank you
Bats, symbol of good fortune, flit over the sunset surface of this Ki-seto vase by Kato Sakusuke enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kiseto Kabin. An inscription inside begins Fukuju ? Zu (Lucky ? Image) and appears to be dated 1919 in the 60 year cyclical Zodiac calendar (possibly 1859). This is followed by the signature of a painter who also signed and dated the vase, indicating Sakusuke made the vase, while another artist provided the decoration. It is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, retaining the original cloth pouch.
Kato Sakusuke I (Sakube, 1808-1893) was born into a family of potters in Owari (mod. Aichi Prefecture). He took over the family business as Kato Kagekiyo and was known for producing both Japanese and Western ceramics for daily use such as sake sets and tea sets. He took the name Sakusuke in his later years. He was succeeded by his son. Kato Sakusuke II (Keizaburo, 1844-1923). He was an avid collector of ancient pottery and devoted himself to researching its shape and techniques. At first he fired porcelain, but later he turned to his main occupation and skillfully copied old pottery such as Furu-seto (old seto ware), Kizeto, Oribe, Shino, Ofukai, and Mishima. He became a master craftsman of the Meiji era with a technique as good as that of his father Kagekiyo.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1485955
The Kura
sold, thank you
An unusual woven basket of bamboo strips and roots in the shape of a cocoon or bird nest dating from the 20th century. It can be used flat on a table or even better suspended on the wall or pillar. It is 43 cm (17 inches) long and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1485958
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite lacquered box covered in gold powder prominently bearing the imperial crest given as a gift to Baron Nakamura Satoru in Meiji 44 (1911). According to the inside of the lid this box was created for the Meiji emperor and given in gratitude to the Baron for his support in creating the Keanfu memorial for fallen soldiers of the Russo-Japanese war. The box is an exquisite example of Imperial splendor featuring leaves tinged with kiri-gane gold inlay over powdered gold on a surface dusted with gold and blue-gold powder. It is 20.5 x 24.5 x 13.5 cm (10 x 8 x 5-1/2 inches) and in perfect condition.
Baron Nakamura Satoru (18 March 1854 – 29 January 1925) was a career soldier in the early Imperial Japanese Army, serving during the Russo-Japanese War, and was an aide-de-camp to Emperor Taishō. He was born the second son of a samurai of Hikone (present-day Shiga Prefecture). Joining the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army in July 1871, he was promoted to corporal in November 1873. After attending the Imperial Army Academy, he was commissioned second lieutenant in November 1874. He fought as an officer in the 2nd Brigade during the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877 then was assigned to the Imperial Army General Staff Office from March 1879. After promotion to Major he became a battalion commander with the 10th Infantry Regiment. He served as an instructor at the Army Staff College from December 1889. Nakamura was appointed aide-de-camp to the Crown Prince (the future Emperor Taishō) in December 1891, and promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1892. During the First Sino-Japanese War, he served as Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan from the end of October 1894 and was promoted to colonel in December of the same year. In April 1897, he was given command of the 46th Infantry Regiment, which served as a garrison force in Taiwan. He was promoted to major general in September 1899. From April 1900, he was chief-of-staff of the military bureau of the Governor-General of Taiwan. In March 1902, Nakamura was assigned command of the 2nd Brigade, which deployed to Manchuria in March 1904 as part of the Japanese Third Army at the start of the Russo-Japanese War. The unit served with distinction during the Battle of Nanshan. During the Siege of Port Arthur Nakamura led a force named the Shirodasukitai, after the distinctive white tasuki used for visibility and identification in the darkness of a pre-dawn attack. The Shirodasukitai assaulted the Russian fortifications three times, taking great casualties. Nakamura was himself wounded during the assault on the night of 26 November 1904, during which most of his 4,500 man unit was annihilated with no significant result.
He continued in command positions and in September 1907, he was made a baron (danshaku) in the kazoku peerage system. At the end of December 1908, he was once again Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan. In September 1914, he served as resident-general of the Kwantung Leased Territory. In January 1915, he was promoted to full general. During World War I he was appointed to sit the Supreme War Council in 1917. On his death, he was posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1486011
The Kura
$2,000.00
A lovely tray in the shape of a split lotus leaf by Ito Tetsugai enclosed in a period wooden box titled Sencha Shiki Habon. It is roughly 53 x 25 cm (20-1/2 x 10 inches), expertly carved to be incredibly thin. Trays like these were used as decorative objects in the service of steeped green tea, and were very popular from the Meiji through early Showa eras.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1486269
The Kura
sold, thank you
An antique gilt bronze Buddhist tower finial with three pierced flame flanges richly engraved with scrolling vines mounted on a hardwood pedestal It is 53 cm tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1900 item #1487183
The Kura
sold, thank you
A stunning large Menuki in the form of a writhing dragon of gilt copper dating from the 19th century, It is 7.5 cm (3 inches) long and in perfect condition, retaining both the original studs on back unused. The Year of the Dragon is coming up!
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487185
The Kura
$2,400.00
A very large mask of heavily carved wood covered in black lacquer with golden eyes dating from the mid Edo period (18th century). There are minor losses to the lacquer on the cheeks and along the edges typical of age. It is 37.5 x 30 cm (14-1/2 x 12 inches) and is in overall fine condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Swords and Related : Pre 1900 item #1487186
The Kura
sold, thank you
An Edo period coat (haubergeon) and “kote” (mitons) of linked chain over layers of indigo dyed blue cloth decorated with family crests in gold. The chain, Kikko collar, outer layers of cloth and leather piping are all in overall excellent condition, the original pale blue lining is much worn away. This is made for an adult.
In Japan, mail is called kusari which means chain. When the word kusari is used in conjunction with an armored item it usually means that mail makes up the majority of the armor composition. Kusari jackets, hoods, gloves, vests, shin guards, shoulder guards, thigh guards, and other armored clothing were produced, even kusari socks. Kusari gusoku or chain armor was commonly used during the Edo period 1603 to 1868 as a stand-alone defense. According to George Cameron Stone: Entire suits of mail kusari gusoku were worn on occasions, sometimes under the ordinary clothing. In his book Arms and Armor of the Samurai: The History of Weaponry in Ancient Japan, Ian Bottomley shows a picture of a kusari armor and mentions kusari katabira (chain jackets) with detachable arms being worn by samurai police officials during the Edo period. The end of the samurai era in the 1860s, along with the 1876 ban on wearing swords in public, marked the end of any practical use for mail and other armor in Japan. Japan turned to a conscription army and uniforms replaced armor.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1487187
The Kura
$2,800.00
A beautifully crafted cast, carved, and parcel gilt bronze image of a samurai pulling back, arrow nocked, ready to let fly, signed in a metal cartouche on back Shunko-saku (made by Shunko). It is roughly 27.5 cm (11 inches) to the top of his hat, 25 cm (10 inches) from forefinger to elbow. The warrior is calm, determined, with a look of deep concentration in his inlaid eyes. He wears an eboshi, a formal type of hat, and is dressed in sumptuous, loose fitting robes with leggings and braces to protect his arms and legs. A short sword juts from his waist. The warrior's robes and pants feature large wagon wheel mon, known as genji guruma. The signed box identifies the figure as Minamoto no Tametomo (1139 - 1170) was a celebrated historical samurai of the Heian Period. Known for his impressive archery skills, he features as one of the epic warriors of the Hogen Rebellion, a precursor to the Genpei War. It is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #1487190
The Kura
$2,500.00
A Hikeshi-Banten Fireman Jacket decorated with protective images of waves and birds outside in various dyed colors and sashiko stitching, the inside emblazoned with a dragon and tiger; symbols respectively of wisdom and protection (the dragon is a water god) and ferocity and bravery as the tiger knows no fear. The handmade coats were fashioned from several layers of highly absorbent quilted cotton fabric. They were then resist-dyed using the tsutsugaki method, which involved drawing rice-paste designs on the cloth, dyeing the cloth multiple times and then washing off the paste to reveal the layering of colors. They were worn plain side out and before firefighters entered the scene of a blaze, the coats were thoroughly soaked in water (they could weigh more than 75 pounds) to protect the men from burns and blunt the impact of falling objects as they went about their dangerous work. If firefighters were successful in extinguishing the blaze, they would turn their coats inside out and parade victoriously by cheering onlookers. According to the Denver Art Museum:
Decoration was important to firefighters’ garments, which were far from purely utilitarian uniforms. Firefighters enjoyed respect and high status in urban Japan, especially in Edo, where wood architecture and crowded living conditions led to frequent outbreaks of fire. Commoners wore reversible coats (hikeshi-banten) made of thick, quilted cotton fabric, with a plain indigo-dyed exterior and an elaborately decorated interior.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1487200
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully cast bronze dragon waterspout from an ancient Japanese garden in Nara prefecture made to rise over the edge of a water basin, the water trickling out through his mouth. It retains the original bronze pipe and connector, overall, in excellent original condition. The dragon itself is roughly 25 x 13 x 20 cm tall (10 x 5 x 8 inches) and weighs 3.9 kg (8.5 pounds). Including the pipe roughly 50 cm long.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487235
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Tea Pot by Otagaki Rengetsu with a handle like bamboo root inscribed with a poem which reads: Ko no kimi wa
medetaki fushi wo
kasane tsutsu
sue no yo nagaki
tameshi nari keri.
This translates as:
Our young bamboo
piling up happy knots
year upon year—
its tips reaching high
a paragon to us.
It is roughly 10 cm (4 inches) diameter. And comes enclosed in a wooden box annotated by Koen of Jinkoin temple, where Rengetsu lived. On the side of the box is written what appears to be Kae-ichinen san-gatsu (3rd month of 1848), Otagaki Rengetsu Ni Waka iri Dobin (Pot engraved with Poem by Nun Otagaki Rengetsu). It appears the handle has been broken and repaired twice, and there is a tiny chip in the rim of the lid (see pictures).
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1800 item #1487278
The Kura
$800.00
A bucolic scene of temples and rugged seaside hills dotted with pagodas in silver and gold wraps around the black surface of this deep tray dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period (16th-17th century). It is 27 cm (10-1/2 inches) diameter, 8.5 cm (3-3/8 inches) tall. The bottom has been re-lacquered at some time in the past. There is wear and cracks to the inside typical of age and use, and the rim has been re-done in gin-dame powdered tarnished-silver, which blends well with the ancient feeling of the piece.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487331
The Kura
$2,500.00
A shard has been grafted into the side of this large misshapen Shino bottle dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period, the repair lined with gold. Gold also circle the neck where the discarded misfire was repaired, and gleams on the lip. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an age darkened wooden box titled Ko-Shino Tokkuri, Shoki no Kama (Old Shino Tokkuri, early Kiln era)
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. It is said that this technique was used as a sign of reconciliation between two warring factions during the Sengoku Period, the era of warfare surrounding the 1500s. It was common for the leaders of these factions to hold tea ceremonies with each other to negotiate peace. It is said that, when the negotiations were successful, yobitsugi was used to combine the tea sets used at the meeting where peace was decided.
All Items : Artists : Lacquer : Contemporary item #1487458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautiful hand crafted box by Nitta Kiun enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Tanzaku Bako (Poem Card Box). It is 40 x 11 x 7 cm and in perfect condition. Nitta Kiun was born in Wakayama in 1944, and studied woodcraft under his father, establishing his own woodcraft studio in 1980. He held his first Solo exhibition in 1985, and was accepted for the first time the following year into the Nihon Dento Kogeiten National Crafts Exhibition. He was awarded Governors prize in 1988 at the Wakayama Prefectural Exhibition, and has since been much lauded.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1487484
The Kura
SOLD
A carved wood figure of a wandering priest, robes billowing in the wind, his large straw hat full of holes, signed Yasuchika on the back. Dating from the late Edo to Meiji period, it is by a member of the Tsuchiya Yasuchika lineage. The figure is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, complete with walking stick.