The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486010
The Kura
$650.00
A set of 12 natural gourd bowls lacquered black inside for serving small appetizers and Suimono soup used to cleanse the pallet between courses in traditional Kaiseki cuisine. Made from natural gourds, they vary in size, roughly 6 at 10.5 cm (4 inches) diameter, 6 at 12 cm (5 inches) diameter. They are in overall fine condition.
The basic setting in Japanese food is Ichiju-Sansai or one soup, three dishes. So instead of mixing everything on one plate, each part of the meal is given its own dish. Much Japanese food is still served fresh, and so the four seasons are an indispensable factor for the table. Suimono Wan are bowls for clear soup served between parts of the meal to clean the palette.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1473156
The Kura
sold, thank you
An early Edo period Ki-Seto sake cup repurposed with a silver lid pierced with a chrysanthemum to function as an incense burner enclosed in a custom made silk pouch and bamboo case dating the transformation to New Years of Kae-7 (1854). Without the lid it is 5.5 cm (roughly 2 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1481959
The Kura
sold, thank you
A pair of bottle-shaped heishi vases made for tribute to the gods emblazoned with the characters Dai-Kichi (Great Fortune) by Imamura Joen (1635-1717) signed on the base and enclosed in a wooden collectors box. They are 20.5 cm (8 inches) tall each and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1474892
The Kura
sold, thank you
A magnificent set of five wooden bowls lacquered red with a net design enclosed in the original wooden box titled Shu-nuri Amime Hashiaraiwan dating from the first half of the 20th century. Excluding the lid each is 7.5 cm (3 inches) tall, roughly the same diameter at the rim, and all are in excellent condition. Repeated use of lacquer tends to see the black acquire a brown tinge. These remain jet black, and it is likely they have been virtually unused for the better part of a century.
Hashiaraiwan (also called Hitokuchiwan) are used after the first four courses in Kaiseki food to clear the pallet, ordinarily a thin soup or something light. The literal meaning is washing the chopsticks bowl.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1970 item #1483741 (stock #MOR8453)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of six anonymous colored lacquer trays decorated with rock garden imagery in lead, mother of pearl and raised lacquer techniques. Each tray is roughly 48 x 27.5 cm (19 x 11 inches) and all are entirely unique, with different colors and designs and in overall excellent condition. Each comes wrapped in a faded blue cloth pouch.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1481938
The Kura
sold, thank you
A fine pottery koro in typical milky white glaze supported by three figures in russet red by Okuda Mokuhaku dating from the mid 19th century. It is 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 11.2 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall. There is a chip in the rim, otherwise is in excellent condition. It is stamped on the base AKahadayama followed by a circular seal reading Mokuhaku. t comes in a simple wooden box.
Akahada Pottery, starting around 1585, was created by several kilns in the area of Yamato-Koriyama, Nara. It is one of the Seven Kilns of Enshu so named because Kobori Enshu, a prominent tea master, favored them. There is no clear record as to the origin of the pottery, but reportedly it started at a kiln built on Akahada Mountain in Gojyou village by Toyotomi Hideyoshi during the Momoyama period. There was a serious decline due to the political changes in the mid 18th century, however in 1785 the feudal lord in Koriyama castle in Nara Yanagisawa Yasumitsu, asked two potters named Inosuke and Jihei to revitalize production. After 1785 the kilns had the patronage of the Daimyo feudal lord of Koriyama castle. Akahada pottery thrived under the protection of a succession of federal lords during the late Edo period and, by the very end of the period, Okuda Mokuhaku, (1800-1871) a noted master-craftsman, had succeeded in making the pottery well-known beyond that region.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488518
The Kura
$1,200.00
A beautifully carved tray of overlapping leaves interspersed with clustered grapes by Ichikawa Shudo signed on back in a circular cartouche. In one corner an odd round tail leads us to a squirrel head popping through the leaves, as if one were looking up through the vines toward the sky. It is 46 x 35 x 3 cm (roughly 18 x 14 x 1 inches) and is in overall fine condition, There is a slight warp to the bottom of the tray, but it is still bery usable and there is no damage to the carving. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1800 item #1487278
The Kura
$800.00
A bucolic scene of temples and rugged seaside hills dotted with pagodas in silver and gold wraps around the black surface of this deep tray dating from the Momoyama to early Edo period (16th-17th century). It is 27 cm (10-1/2 inches) diameter, 8.5 cm (3-3/8 inches) tall. The bottom has been re-lacquered at some time in the past. There is wear and cracks to the inside typical of age and use, and the rim has been re-done in gin-dame powdered tarnished-silver, which blends well with the ancient feeling of the piece.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487734
The Kura
sold, thank you
A spectacular collapsed pottery jar from the Karatsu tradition with a purpose-warped wooden lid covered in powdered silver enclosed in a top quality ancient red-lacquered kiri-wood box lined with wave-patterned colored-paper. The ancient box has silver lacquer writing on the top reading Kodai Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Ki, Mizusashi (Ancient Karatsu Tsubo, Kamakura Period, Mizusashi). The pot is 17 cm (7 inches) diameter, 15 cm (6 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1487575
The Kura
$900.00
A lovely chawan made of three separate excavated shards connected by lines of gold dating from the Kamakura to early Muromachi periods (13th to 14th centuries). It is 15.7 cm diameter, 7 cm tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in an old wooden box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1478355
The Kura
sold, thank you
A sage, strikes a forever pose as he stares into the distance, robes billowing in the wind, contemplating the troubles of lesser beings, a fan clutched behind. This is a beautiful bronze sculpture dating from early 20th century Japan paying homage to the literati and Confucian traditions which formed the basis of Japanese ideology at the time. It is signed Kiyoshi with an engraved signature on the hem of his robes. The figure stands 39 cm (15-1/2 inches) tall and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1484089
The Kura
sold, thank you
A very unusual lacquered Jubako stacking box in the shape of a water cauldron made for serving food at events and celebrations. It is finshed with metallic textured silver-black lacquer simulating old iron. The lid and base are shiny black lacquer, the interior coated in festive red. Cranes and turtles, symbols of longevity, populate the inside in gold. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter and comes enclosed in an age darkened period wood box titled Kamagata Kashiki. There are two repairs to the red lacquer of the interior trays and marks consistent with use, but overall in fine condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1469443 (stock #OC069)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A crow at rest upon a rock raises its head in a gruff cry by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Karasu Okimono. It is pierced in the back, allowing it to be an oki-koro incense burner. It is 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition. A nearly identical piece was published in the 1923 book Sozan Toko, attributed to his late period.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1487187
The Kura
$2,800.00
A beautifully crafted cast, carved, and parcel gilt bronze image of a samurai pulling back, arrow nocked, ready to let fly, signed in a metal cartouche on back Shunko-saku (made by Shunko). It is roughly 27.5 cm (11 inches) to the top of his hat, 25 cm (10 inches) from forefinger to elbow. The warrior is calm, determined, with a look of deep concentration in his inlaid eyes. He wears an eboshi, a formal type of hat, and is dressed in sumptuous, loose fitting robes with leggings and braces to protect his arms and legs. A short sword juts from his waist. The warrior's robes and pants feature large wagon wheel mon, known as genji guruma. The signed box identifies the figure as Minamoto no Tametomo (1139 - 1170) was a celebrated historical samurai of the Heian Period. Known for his impressive archery skills, he features as one of the epic warriors of the Hogen Rebellion, a precursor to the Genpei War. It is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1481233
The Kura
sold, thank you
This child with a pleasant face happily rides his toy horse, the horse looking just as pleased. The entirety is a porcelain sake server from the Saga region on the southern Island of Kyushu, home to Imari, Hirado and other porcelain ware. A bung of black persimmon wood has been added as a lid in the shape of a Chinese hat. It is 21 x 12 x 21 cm (8 x 4-3/4 x 8 inches) and in overall fine, original condition, dating from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1487485
The Kura
sold, thank you
Ring in the New Year with this beautifully cast bronze bell surmounted by a dragon embellished with Characters of good fortune enclosed in an ancient red-lacquered wooden storage box. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter, 21 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition, dating from the Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1487200
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully cast bronze dragon waterspout from an ancient Japanese garden in Nara prefecture made to rise over the edge of a water basin, the water trickling out through his mouth. It retains the original bronze pipe and connector, overall, in excellent original condition. The dragon itself is roughly 25 x 13 x 20 cm tall (10 x 5 x 8 inches) and weighs 3.9 kg (8.5 pounds). Including the pipe roughly 50 cm long.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1478829 (stock #MOR7925)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite bronze image of an ancient sage, a gnarled staff supporting his crooked frame with a golden fan capped with silver feathers clutched in his right hand. The Detail is superb, from the evocative expression to the minute details on his robe and accoutrements. It is signed on the foot Seiun (Hara Souemon), a top quality bronze, expressive and detailed. The figure is 10 inches (25.5 cm) tall and in excellent condition.
The Seiun family began bronze casting by the lost wax method in the later Edo to Meiji period, receiving the technique directly from Hara Takusai. Each piece is unique, unlike many foundries which employ re-usable molds. They are currently in the 5th generation, and have been named an intangible cultural property of Niigata Prefecture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1469959 (stock #MW013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite dark bronze image of the deity Benzaiten playing a four stringed lute known as a Biwa signed in a cartouche inset into the base and dating from the early 20th century (Later Meiji to taisho period). The figure is 20 x 16 x 18 cm (8 x 6 x 7 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Benzaiten (or Benten) is the Japanese embodiment of Saraswati, the hindu god of the arts. Benzaiten is depicted a number of ways in Japanese art. She is often depicted holding a biwa (a traditional Japanese lute) similar to how Saraswati is depicted with a veena in Indian art In medieval Japan, Benzaiten came to be associated with a number of Buddhist and local deities, which include the goddess Kisshōten (the Buddhist version of the Hindu Lakshmi), the snake god Ugajin (thus Benzaiten is sometimes depicted with a snake) and the kami Ichikishimahime. Apart from being a patron of music and the arts, she was also worshiped as one of the Seven Gods of Fortune (Shichifukujin).
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1478247 (stock #MW008)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A white bronze sculpture of crashing waves supporting three glass orbs; an elegant form carrying good fortune from old Japan. It is 49 cm (19-1/4 inches) long and in overall excellent condition. Set it in the window and watch the orbs blow colorful prisms across the room.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1800 item #1487806
The Kura
Price on Request
An exquisite large seated image of Jizo Bosatsu, the protective deity of children and travelers, sits resplendent atop a lotus, one leg dangling, his Shakujo staff and golden Jewel held aloft in his hands. This is a superb rendition, the carving of the face showing great detail and care, the robes flowing with intricate designs, and the entire gilded in gold. This serenely graceful figure exemplifies the idealistic sculptural style that was often employed to convey the special ethos of Pure Land Buddhism: Jizō's warm, truthful facial features give him a compassionate expression that invites faith, which, in turn, will lead to salvation. His gently flowing robe, with its finely crafted gold-leaf designs, enhances the impression of elegant refinement. Edo period, 18th century, the total is 87 cm (almost three feet) tall, the image is 48.5 cm (19 inches) tall including the lowered leg. It is in excellent condition.
We have many more photos of this piece, please inquire if you would like to see them.
Jizō is a Bosatsu (Bodhisattva), one of a group of enlightened beings who choose to delay entry into Nirvana in order to help others. Represented in the guise of a Buddhist monk and devoid of the crown and jewels customarily worn by Bodhisattva, Jizo Bosatsu is among the most readily recognizable and beloved of the many deities in the Japanese Buddhist pantheon. Called Ksitigarbha ("Earth Womb") in Sanskrit, Jizo vowed not to enter Nirvana until the realms of hell were emptied. Primarily known as the Bodhisattva of the Hell Realm, he travels to all of the Six Realms and is a guide and guardian of those between rebirths. In classic iconography, he is depicted as a monk carrying a wish-fulfilling jewel and a staff with six rings, one for each realm. This staff is based on the belief that this deity does not reside in the Pure Land, but rather remains active in this world. His statues are a common sight, especially by roadsides and in graveyards. He is worshiped as the guardian of the souls of Mizuko, stillborn, miscarried, or aborted fetuses, and is considered the protector of children. He is also believed to be one of the protective deities of travelers.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1920 item #1473519
The Kura
sold, thank you
The androgynous Kannon sits in meditation under climbing rocks and tumbling waves deeply carved into the side of this bamboo incense container dating from the early 20th century (late Meiji to Taisho period). It is 34 cm long (13-1/2 inches) long and in excellent condition, a superb example of the genre. This would have been used to hold incense sticks.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1478249
The Kura
sold, thank you
A carved lacquer box which pays homage to Chinese literary taste while presenting itself clearly in a modern, Japanese way (for turn of the century lacquerware at least) by 2nd generation lacquer artist Ishii Yusuke enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The tsuishu lacquer technique requires applying layer upon layer of lacquer which is then carved through and polished, a painstaking process. This piece is exquisitely crafted, carved and polished revealing the many layers of lacquer, it is 13.5 x 10.5 x 5.5 cm (5-1/2 x 4 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition. On bottom in a bell-shaped gold cartouche are the characters Yusuke. According to the box it was held in the collection of the Kuriyama Sodo, home of Ishizaka Sennosuke who was a member of the governing assembly of Toyama prefecture.
Ishii Yusuke (1851-1925) was born the second son of the lacquer artist Ishii Yusuke (different characters, 1810-1886) in the waning years of the Edo period. After learning from his father, he became independent, establishing a second branch family in the Yusuke Lacquer Tradition. The first Yusuke Ishii Founded Yusuke lacquerware and created Chinese-style lacquerware in Takaoka, Toyama Prefecture. He pioneered rust painting and gold leaf techniques to express Chinese-style paintings of flowers, birds, and landscapes three-dimensionally on ancient vermilion or matte lacquer. Later, the eldest son succeeded as Yusuke II
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488233
The Kura
$395.00
A carved wooden bowl wrapped in floral motifs dating from the early 20th century signed beneath by the carver. The dimensional imagery depicts lotus leaves, lotus root and clusters of Biwa (loquat) fruit. It is 21 x 20 x 5 cm (roughly 8 inches diameter, 2 inches tall) and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1488432
The Kura
$950.00
Autumnal favorites, a basket of Mattake mushrooms and spiny cluster of chestnuts have been carved into the surface of this pine-wood tray by Ichikawa Shudo dated on back to early summer, 1915 and signed Kochikusai Shudo-to (Carved by Kochikusai Shudo). It is 49 x 31 x 3 cm (roughly 19-1/2 x 15-1/2 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition. Ichikawa Shudo (1868-1933), also known as Shochikusai, brought unique characteristics to Himeji's wood crafts, leaving behind many elegant Sencha-style trays with his outstanding technique.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1487635
The Kura
sold, thank you
Gohon crackled pale glaze covers this Tenmoku shaped Chawan decorated with a blossoming plum harbinger of Spring, signed Sozan followed by a long verse in dramatic calligraphy. It is 12 cm (5 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original signed wooden box.
Suwa Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy. Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However, unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1475187
The Kura
sold, thank you
An incredible Mishima Chawan dating from the Edo period with a wide repair to the rim in dark lacquer decorated with golden grasses in gold maki-e lacquer designs. It comes in an ancient dilapidated silk pouch with cotton buffer enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box titled Mishima Chawan. The bowl is 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall, 12.5 -13.5 cm (5-1/2 -6 inches) diameter and in fine condition. Mishima ware refers to different types of imported and adopted Japanese pottery. Mishima originally refers to the shimamono pottery imported from the islands of Taiwan, Luzon, and "Amakawa" (Macau). They were characterized by being roughly-made and often uneven, thus epitomizing the Japanese aesthetic of wabi-sabi. HOwever the term overall came to refer to impressed and slip-inlayed ceramics in the Korean style like this bowl.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1920 item #1470026 (stock #MW011)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifuly formed iron sake kettle known as a Choshi with a solid silver lid and featuring sliver inlay designs on the handle enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood bos titled Tetsu Choshi Jungin-futa. It is 8 cm (just over 3 inches) diameter, 16 cm (6 inches) to the top of the handle, and is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1489649
The Kura
$1,200.00
An E-karatsu Yobitsugi bowl made of various shards attached with wide bands of gold to a discarded base: the pieces dating from the Momoyama to early Edo periods. It is 22 x 20 x 6 cm 8-1/2 x 8 x 2-1/4 inches) and comes enclosed in a modern kiri-wood collectors box titled E-Karatsu Hachi.
This method of using pieces from multiple works with lacquer repair is called Yobitsugi. Yobitsugi is a form of kintsugi that entails combining pieces of different objects together in order to create a completely new vessel. The newly created vessel is typically made of 60% – 70% of the first vessel and 30%-40% of the second vessel. Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1900 item #1487190
The Kura
$2,500.00
A Hikeshi-Banten Fireman Jacket decorated with protective images of waves and birds outside in various dyed colors and sashiko stitching, the inside emblazoned with a dragon and tiger; symbols respectively of wisdom and protection (the dragon is a water god) and ferocity and bravery as the tiger knows no fear. The handmade coats were fashioned from several layers of highly absorbent quilted cotton fabric. They were then resist-dyed using the tsutsugaki method, which involved drawing rice-paste designs on the cloth, dyeing the cloth multiple times and then washing off the paste to reveal the layering of colors. They were worn plain side out and before firefighters entered the scene of a blaze, the coats were thoroughly soaked in water (they could weigh more than 75 pounds) to protect the men from burns and blunt the impact of falling objects as they went about their dangerous work. If firefighters were successful in extinguishing the blaze, they would turn their coats inside out and parade victoriously by cheering onlookers. According to the Denver Art Museum:
Decoration was important to firefighters’ garments, which were far from purely utilitarian uniforms. Firefighters enjoyed respect and high status in urban Japan, especially in Edo, where wood architecture and crowded living conditions led to frequent outbreaks of fire. Commoners wore reversible coats (hikeshi-banten) made of thick, quilted cotton fabric, with a plain indigo-dyed exterior and an elaborately decorated interior.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1486269
The Kura
$1,500.00
An antique gilt bronze Buddhist tower finial with three pierced flame flanges richly engraved with scrolling vines mounted on a hardwood pedestal It is 53 cm tall and in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1486054
The Kura
Price on Request
A spectacular Meiji to Taisho period Golden box decorated with a spray of flowers under an imperial Chrysanthemum. The interior and bottom are elegant Nashiji, and the border between box and lid is protected by a solid silver rim. Kirigane cut gold flakes decorate the raised leaves. It comes enclosed in a custom made kiri-wood storage box. The gilded receptacle is 30 x 24.5 x 14 cm (12 x 9-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches) and it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1478780
The Kura
sold, thank you
Crabs clamber through the tangled bamboo leaves decorating the rim of this crushed fluted pottery bowl from the kiln of Wake Kitei (also read Waki) dating from the 19th century. This piece shows a great influence from the southern Island of Kyushu and Korean ware, not only in the literati style depiction of crabs, but in the glaze itself which is very much in the vein of Karatsu and or Gohon ware, as well as in the swirling whirlpool inside the footring. The bowl is 28 x 18 x 12 cm (11 x 7 x 5 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened and somewhat dilapidated wooden box.
Kitei Yaki was begun in the mid 18th century in the environs of Kyoto by Kameya Kitei, a 3rd generation craftsman specializing in Dobin and Earthenware Braziers (Kama). He adopted the name Kitei. The second (some say 3rd) generation Kitei went to Kyushu to study Imari wares, developing the family line to include sencha and maccha tea ware as well as regular dishware. This is likely from the 4th generation (1826-1902), a potter representing Kyoto ware in the Meiji period. The 4th generation Kitei was born in Kyoto as the eldest son of the 3rd generation Kameya Heikichiro. In 1862, he inherited the family estate and called himself Kameya Heikichi. In the first year of the Meiji era, he took Wake as his surname. In 1873, he became a purveyor to the Kyoto Prefectural Government's industrial sector. After that, he participated in domestic expositions and exhibitions, where he was awarded including the Philadelphia World's Fair in 1876, the Paris World's Fair in 1878, and the Sydney World's Fair in 1879. Work by him is held in the British Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1470786 (stock #TCR7109)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A dynamic early porcelain work in vivid color by Kiyomizu Rokubei VI enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Futatsuki Kajutu Mon Kashiki (Sweets dish decorated with fruit) bearing his real name, indicating it predates his taking the name Rokubei in 1945. The box bears the seal of the Hattori Tokeiten, purveyors of fine art in Pre-war Japan. The porcelain is 19.7 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition, signed on the bottom.
The Kiyomizu family potters managed one of the most productive workshops in Kyoto’s Gojozaka district throughout the second half of the Edo period. From the Meiji they began producing tableware for export and special pieces for government-sponsored exhibitions under Rokubei IV. Rokubei V led the kiln into the 20th century, and his son, Rokubei VI (1901-1980), would assume lead in 1945, taking the kiln through the tumultuous years after the Second World War. He graduated the Kyoto Municipal School of Arts and Crafts, then the Kyoto Special School of Painting, before apprenticing under his father in 1925. He exhibited frequently and was often prized at the National Bunten, Teiten and Nitten Exhibits, where he later served as judge. He was also lauded abroad, in the USSR, France, Italy, Belgium and was appointed a member of the Japan Art Academy. In 1976 he was awarded the Order of Cultural Merit for his lifelong devotion to promoting Japanese pottery traditions. His works are held in numerous museums throughout the globe.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1470115 (stock #OC081)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exceptional web of gold interspersed with nishiki-cloth patterned designs on gold lacquer fuses this once broken 16th-17th century Koro with ami-me net patterned solid silver lid. This was likely originally made as a tea cup, considering that the entire interior is glazed. Broken and reassembled using the Kintsugi gold technique and placing unusual patterns on the missing portions, this is an exceptional work of art. The silver lid was likely made when it was repaired and repurposed as an incense burner. It is 8 cm diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and is in excellent condition. It comes in an antique cloth pouch with solid silver lid enclosed in a compartmentalized age-darkened kiri-wood box.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1486460
The Kura
$500.00
A beautiful 2 Stage lacquered container covered in black lacquer decorated with flowering vines. The domed lid opens to reveal a circular tray removable to open a deep container. It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1485958
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite lacquered box covered in gold powder prominently bearing the imperial crest given as a gift to Baron Nakamura Satoru in Meiji 44 (1911). According to the inside of the lid this box was created for the Meiji emperor and given in gratitude to the Baron for his support in creating the Keanfu memorial for fallen soldiers of the Russo-Japanese war. The box is an exquisite example of Imperial splendor featuring leaves tinged with kiri-gane gold inlay over powdered gold on a surface dusted with gold and blue-gold powder. It is 20.5 x 24.5 x 13.5 cm (10 x 8 x 5-1/2 inches) and in perfect condition.
Baron Nakamura Satoru (18 March 1854 – 29 January 1925) was a career soldier in the early Imperial Japanese Army, serving during the Russo-Japanese War, and was an aide-de-camp to Emperor Taishō. He was born the second son of a samurai of Hikone (present-day Shiga Prefecture). Joining the fledgling Imperial Japanese Army in July 1871, he was promoted to corporal in November 1873. After attending the Imperial Army Academy, he was commissioned second lieutenant in November 1874. He fought as an officer in the 2nd Brigade during the Satsuma Rebellion of 1877 then was assigned to the Imperial Army General Staff Office from March 1879. After promotion to Major he became a battalion commander with the 10th Infantry Regiment. He served as an instructor at the Army Staff College from December 1889. Nakamura was appointed aide-de-camp to the Crown Prince (the future Emperor Taishō) in December 1891, and promoted to lieutenant colonel in September 1892. During the First Sino-Japanese War, he served as Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan from the end of October 1894 and was promoted to colonel in December of the same year. In April 1897, he was given command of the 46th Infantry Regiment, which served as a garrison force in Taiwan. He was promoted to major general in September 1899. From April 1900, he was chief-of-staff of the military bureau of the Governor-General of Taiwan. In March 1902, Nakamura was assigned command of the 2nd Brigade, which deployed to Manchuria in March 1904 as part of the Japanese Third Army at the start of the Russo-Japanese War. The unit served with distinction during the Battle of Nanshan. During the Siege of Port Arthur Nakamura led a force named the Shirodasukitai, after the distinctive white tasuki used for visibility and identification in the darkness of a pre-dawn attack. The Shirodasukitai assaulted the Russian fortifications three times, taking great casualties. Nakamura was himself wounded during the assault on the night of 26 November 1904, during which most of his 4,500 man unit was annihilated with no significant result.
He continued in command positions and in September 1907, he was made a baron (danshaku) in the kazoku peerage system. At the end of December 1908, he was once again Aide-de-camp to the Emperor of Japan. In September 1914, he served as resident-general of the Kwantung Leased Territory. In January 1915, he was promoted to full general. During World War I he was appointed to sit the Supreme War Council in 1917. On his death, he was posthumously awarded the Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1486081
The Kura
$1,600.00
A large vase, the mouse-colored glaze inlaid with vertical lines of white slip reminiscent of traditional Kyoto Mugiwara design by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Utsushi Nawa-Sudare Cho Kabin (Vase inlaid with Draped Rope design following Ninsei style). It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 26 cm10 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base Kozan alongside the impressed seal of the artist.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1478458
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully turned bowl lacquered burnt orange-red over a black foot dating from the late 19th to early 20th century enclosed in an old kiri wood box titled Negoro-nuri Kashiki followed by a signature. The faintest brush strokes in perfect lines swirl around the outside, and cross the bowl inside. The bowl itself is also signed in red on the base. It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1487457
The Kura
$400.00
A set of four long low doors from an alcove painted with the scene of men floating logs downt the Hozu river from Kameoka into Kyoto’s Arashiyama district. This was a favorite scene of Nihonga artists from time immemorial. The scee is performed with ink and gofun powdered shell on paper with applied gold flake, each panel wrapped in a black lacquered frame with bronze handles. 47 x 29 cm (18-1/2 x 11-1/2 inches) and they are made for an opening 185.5 x 28.5 cm (73 x 11-1/4 inches). Overall excellent condition, signed by the artist on the far right.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1472306 (stock #OC055)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A beautifully sculpted image of a pheasant by Ogawa Yuhei enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 37 cm long and in excellent condition.
Yuhei Ogawa (1885-1945) was born in Takamatsu, Okayama prefecture an came to pottery a bit later than most. In 1923, while working part time at the Naval Hydrographic Department, he was deeply moved by seeing the solo exhibition of ceramic sculptor Kazumasa Numata. This gave him impetus to begin sculpting in his free time. Although he started his career as an artist late at the age of 37, he was selected for the opening exhibition of the newly established arts and crafts department at the Teiten National Exhibition in 1927, and frequently thereafter. He participated in the activities of the Totokai, a group of potters living in the Kanto region, with Itaya Hazan, Numata Kazumasa and Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan II serving as advisors, and played an active role as a central artist. In 1934 he was invited to Iwaki Glass Factory as an advisor and created pottery sculptures and glass works for the rest of his life. A sculpture of a black panther is held in the collection of the Tokyo National Museum of Modern Art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1473954
The Kura
sold, thank you
An ornate porcelain image of a horse draped in full regalia by Miyanaga Tozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The detail about the head is fabulous, and the artist has done an excellent job capturing the musculature of the creature while allowing something ethereal. In Japan horses (and cows and foxes and deer and lots of other creatures) are often enshrined as messengers or embodiments of the gods in Shinto. This is 21 x 9 x 23.5 cm (9-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Miyanaga Tozan I (1868-1941) is one of the most important names in Kyoto ceramics. He was born in Ishikawa prefecture, and graduated from the (now) Tokyo University of Art. While a government employee, he represented Japan at Arts Expositions, and studied art in Europe before returning to Japan in 1902 to devote himself to the production of ceramics, with great emphasis on celadon, one of the most difficult of all ceramic wares. He was direct teacher or mentor to a number of prominent artists including Kitaoji Rosanjin and Arakawa Toyozo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483742
The Kura
sold, thank you
A Taisho period Lacquer writing box of superb quality decorated with a design of a stone lantern under broad leaves enclosed in an age darkened kiri-wood box. The scene is performed with Thick slices of shell and lead inlay on black Ro-iro ground with Taka-maki-e and Hira-maki-e designs. Inside is finished in Kin-gin (gold and silver) Nashiji. It contains two ink stones, a solid silver water dropper and Silver lidded box, as well as the original brushes, hole punch and paper knife all in matching Nashiji finish. The box is 38.5 x 15 x 5.5 cm (15 x x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The Rimpa revival of the early 20th century emphasized visual splendor, decorative patterns, and harmonious compositions reflecting nostalgia for the past. However, it was not a strict replication of the past. Artists involved in this movement integrated modern techniques and materials into their work, allowing for a fusion of traditional aesthetics with contemporary artistic practices. This approach enabled artists to create innovative interpretations of the Rimpa style that resonated with the changing times.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1940 item #1470055 (stock #O005)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A solitary thatched hermitage rises on the top of this stony crag set onto a beautifully carved and signed rosewood stand. Together they are 7.5 x 11.5 x 13 cm (3 x 4-1/2 x 5 inches) and in excellent condition. The box is titled Yasegawa-ishi, inside signed Seicho and dated a fortunate day in the second month of 1936.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1470340 (stock #OC046)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An iconic work with dynamic floral pattern in pale white on pink by Kiyomizu Rokubei V enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Taireiji Ichirinsashi. It is 19.5 cm (7-3/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. The vase retains the original wood stand and stamped cloth pouch. Undeniably Taireiji was the most important development by this innovative artist, and pieces are exceedingly rare.
Kiyomizu Rokubei V (Shimizu Kuritaro, 1875-1959) initially studied painting and decorating technique under Kono Bairei, one of the foremost painters in Japan in the Meiji era. After graduating the Kyoto Municipal Special School of Painting, he took a position under his father at the family kiln however. That same year he exhibited his first work at the National Industrial Exposition. He was a co-founder of Yutoen with his father and Asai Chu, and worked ceaselessly to promote the pottery of Kyoto. He helped to establish the Kyoto Ceramics Research Facility (Kyoto Tojiki Shikensho) at the turn of the century which would be the proving ground for many young artist of the era. Doctor Maezaki Shinya has noted that Teishitsu-Gigei-in (Imperial Art Academy Member) Seifu Yohei III also fired his acclaimed works in the Rokubei kiln in the Taisho era. Due to his father’s poor health Rokubei V took the reins unofficially in 1902, commanding the helm until assuming the name Rokubei V in 1913. It was in 1928 that Rokubei changed the reading of the family name from Shimizu to Kiyomizu and applied it retroactively to previous generations. He exhibited constantly, and garnered a great many awards. He worked to get crafts added to the National Art Exhibition (Bunten/Teiten) and served as a judge in 1927, the first year crafts were allowed. In 1937 he was designated a member of the Imperial Art Council (Teishitsu Bijutsu Inkai). Despite changes in the world around him Rokubei persevered, working in all manner of materials and styles. He retired in 1945, perhaps as exhausted as Japan was with the end of the war, or perhaps seeing that capitulation would signal a new era in need of new leaders and a new aesthetic. He passed the name Rokubei to his son and took the retirement name Rokuwa. Uncontainable he continued to create pottery under that name until his death in 1959. His influence is so pervasive he was voted one of the most important potters of the modern era by Honoho magazine, the preeminent quarterly devoted to Japanese pottery. A multitude of works by him are held in the The National Museums of Modern Art, both in Tokyo and Kyoto, the Kyoto Kyocera Museum, The Kyoto Hakubutsukan Museum and the Philadelphia Art Museum among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1480950
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exquisite Edo period incense burner, the fine red clay covered in running bamboo glaze from the kilns of Takatori on the southern Island of Kyushu wrapped in a silk pouch and enclosed in a period Kiri-wood box. The lid is solid silver pierced with roiling fronds. It is 7.5 cm diameter, 7 cm tall excluding the silver lid, and in excellent condition.
Takatori-yaki, is a traditional style of Japanese pottery that originated in the early 17th century. It was developed in the town of Takatori (mod. Fukuoka Prefecture). Takatori-yaki is renowned for its unique and distinctive aesthetic, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy tones and running glaze. The history of Takatori pottery dates back to the beginning of the Edo period (1603-1868) when a Korean potter named Yi Sam-pyeong, also known as Ri Sampei in Japanese, settled in the area. Yi Sam-pyeong had been brought to Japan by the powerful daimyo (feudal lord) Hosokawa Tadaoki, who ruled over the Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture). Tadaoki was fascinated by Korean pottery and invited skilled potters from Korea to establish kilns in Japan, with Yi Sam-pyeong being one of them. Under the patronage of the Hosokawa family, Yi Sam-pyeong and his descendants established the Takatori kilns in the town of Takatori. Initially, the kilns produced pottery influenced by Korean styles, particularly the Buncheong and Ido wares. However, over time, they developed their own distinct style, blending Korean techniques with Japanese aesthetics. Takatori was highly prized by tea masters and samurai lords who appreciated its rustic charm and humble beauty. Takatori-yaki became an integral part of the tea ceremony culture, as its earthy tones and natural glazes were considered suitable for the serene and rustic atmosphere of tea houses.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1485949
The Kura
sold, thank you
A sagar or kiln shelf support covered in running green and iron glaze from the Edo period kilns of Tamba. The super-heated clay has sloughed off on one side, where it is likely the kiln shelf may have collapsed allowing it to cool in this unusual way. It stands on three legs of soft clay which are affixed to the bottom to keep it from sticking to the shelf below. The owners kiln mark is in the side, and it is very possible this was from an Edo period communal kiln firing, where each potter would have needed to identify their own tools and products. The vessel stands 28.5 cm (11-1/4 inches) tall and is an excellent example of the Japanese aesthetic of valuing the flaws and making good out of misfortune. In this case, a collapsed shelf would have meant loss of much work, however from the ashes one recovers something which speaks in effervescent tones of the ephemeral nature of our lives. A perfect compliment for the tea room.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1486080
The Kura
$780.00
A hand painted cloth banner decorated with imagery by various artists including the Nanga School literati artists Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) and Nakanishi Koseki (1807-1884) as well as Tanaka Koha of the Kagetsuan School of Sencha and Confucian scholar Goto Shoin (1797-1864) and Hirose Kyokuso (1807-1863) who were two of the most important followers of Rai Sanyo. The date Konoe-saru (year of the monkey in metal) is visible in both the central leaf and the lower left gourd image. Judging then by the 60 year cyclical zodiac calendar it dates from the fifth month of 1860. The title, signed Shochiku-Rojin (the old man Shochiku), reads Betsu-yu-ten-chi-hi-jin-kan, a poetic phrase meaning there are other worlds aside from that of the human plane, specifically alluding to a world without human desire. Perhaps when these learned gentlemen gathered for tea beyond this curtain, they felt that they had experienced one of these other worlds. The cloth is 91 x 160 cm (36 x 63 inches) including a pouch through which a bamboo stave would have been run for hanging. Toned somewhat with age, the fibers are strong.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1488230
The Kura
$2,750.00
Phoenix soar among golden clouds on this amazing Lacquer box made for holding a Tsuzumi drum by Miura Meiho (1900-1975) enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Houn Maki-e Tuzumi Bako. It is bound with silk chord which is held to the box with solid silver hardware. Inside it is lined with brocade. The box is 30.5 x 24 x 24.5 cm (12 x 9-1/2 x 9-1/2 inches) an is in perfect condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1483563
The Kura
sold, thank you
An Inuyama style pottery dish covered in black lacquer; the two pinched areas of the rim decorated with slight gold designs of fortuitous symbols from the Toyoraku kiln of Nagoya. Inside the dish features crackled glaze decorated with young pine and bamboo shoots with splashes of Oribe green. The Toyoraku stamp is visible to the left of the design. The dish is roughly 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
The Toyoraku tradition began in the mid 1700s, however it was the fourth generation head of the household (Toyosuke IV 1813~1858) who moved the kiln to Kamimaezu in Nagoya and began applying lacquer and Maki-e to the works. He was succeeded by his son, Toyosuke V (d. 1885) who passed the kiln to his own son Toyosuke VI, (d. 1917), who was highly lauded in his lifetime and made pottery on order of the Meiji emperor, his pieces being selected for international exhibition. The family lineage ended in the Taisho period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Netsuke and Related : Pre 1900 item #1486047
The Kura
sold, thank you
An elongated netsuke of bamboo carved at the root to represent the heads of a Reishi (Ling Zhi or bracket mushroom). It is 23 cm (9 inches) long and in excellent condition. Contrary to the ordinary Netsuke which are attached to long cords passed through the sash, the Sashi Netsuke has a very short cord and the netsuke itself is thrust between the sash and the Kimono. Their shape is thus long and flat.
The Reishi (Chinese Lingzhi), is the ancient "mushroom of immortality", revered for over 2,000 years. In the poetry of Ban Gu of the 1st century CE is an ode dedicated to Lingzhi. Taoist temples were called "the abode of mushrooms" and according to their mystical teachings, the use of a concentrated decoction of spirits mushroom gave followers the opportunity to see spirits or become spirits themselves by receiving the magical energy of the immortals who lived in the heavenly "mushroom fields". The Divine Farmer's Classic of Pharmaceutics of the 3rd century CE classifies zhi into six categories, each of which is believed to benefit the qi, or "life force", in a different part of the body.
Nyoi (Chinese Ruyi) is a ceremonial scepter or talisman used by and seen in Buddhist and Daoist art an cultural references. It likely originated from Sanskrit anuruddha "a ceremonial scepter" used by Buddhist monks in India, who later brought the concept to China where it became a symbol of authority. There it blended with the back-scratcher, and there is an interesting story behind that. As a Buddhist monk was not meant to marry, he would forsake having children. The Back Scratcher (Mago-no-Te) literally translates as the “Hand of the Grandchild”. As a monk would have no grandchildren, thus no one to scratch his back or ease his old age, the spirits of those that were not born would be embodied in the scepter. It is one of the most precious objects to a priest. It is often seen also with literati and nobles who held Nyoi during social occasions, and there seems no doubt that the original function was that of a scepter qualifying the holder to "take the floor, similar to the fly whisk or fan. In art they often appear as attributes of Buddhist saints and Daoist immortals. Although Chinese Ruyi are often of precious materials such as jade, precious metals and or are jewel encrusted, the Japanese emphasis on frugality and self-effacement promotes an aesthetic of simple, unadorned natural objects, often of wood or bamboo.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487634
The Kura
$1,500.00
Unusual Pottery sweets dish in soft green glaze by the 11th generation head of the Raku Family Keinyu, enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Chagata Kobachi. Covered in crackled pale green glaze, it is 11.5 cm diameter, 8 cm tall and in excellent condition.
The 11th generation head of the Raku family, Keinyu, was born a second son of Ogawa Naohachi, a sake brewer from Tanba, the present Kameoka city in Kyoto, he was adopted in the Raku family as Tannyû's son-in-law, assuming the name of Keinyû. He succeeded as the 11th generation in 1845. He retired in 1871. The period he lived through was an age of transmission from the feudalism of the Tokugawa Shogunate to the modernization of the Meiji government introducing the modern cultural prospects from the West. At the same time he saw the collapse of traditional culture including the tea culture. Over a long production of ceramics under such unfavourable circumstances, Keinyû, however, vigorously made a variety of ceramics, not only tea bowls but other tea utensils as well as decorative objects, considered as the most versatile among all the Raku generations. His work is endowed with a high quality of artifice as well as a poetic sensibility.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1487710 (stock #OC019)
The Kura
$2,900.00
Sale Pending
Reaching for his hat, the boatman leans out arms extended toward the prow, protected from the elements under a woven reed roof. This beautiful incense burner comes enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 24 x 8 x 10 cm (9-1/2 x 3-1/4 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1950 item #1487184
The Kura
sold, thank you
Long armed shrimp, a symbol in any culture of a festive meal, decorate in red the shunkei lacquered surfaces of these turned bamboo basins called Haisen made for washing sake cups between drinks. Each bowl is turned from a bamboo node, celebrating the natural basin formed by the bamboo tree and used from time immemorial in Asia. They are 13 cm (5 inches) diameter, 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition, enclosed in the original kiri-wood box signed Shunko.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1489650
The Kura
$965.00
An exquisitely carved wooden tray in the shape of a Bushukan (Buddhas Hand Fruit) made for presentation of Sencha Tea dating from the early 20th century signed on back Koseki. Upon one curling leaf rests a snail opposite a frog staring off into the distance as in a Zen state. The tray is 53.5 x 30 cm (21 x 12 inches) and is in excellent condition. Beneath is equally beautifully carved, with the signature Koseki engraved into the stem of the cluster.
The importance of the Sencha tea aesthetic from the late Edo through the early Showa periods cannot be overlooked, and has been studied in depth in the book Tea of the Sages, the Art of Sencha by Patricia Jane Graham.
Bushukan, also known as Buddha's hand fruit, is a unique citrus fruit that holds significant cultural and symbolic importance in various Asian cultures, particularly in China and Japan. Buddha's hand fruit is often associated with good fortune, happiness, and longevity. In Buddhist culture, the fruit is sometimes offered in temples or used as a religious offering. Its association with Buddha's hand signifies spiritual purity and enlightenment. The fruit's visually striking appearance makes it popular for decorative purposes, especially during festivals and celebrations. It's often displayed in homes as a symbol of prosperity and good luck.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1488705
The Kura
$2,500.00
A protective deity is carved into this Piece of a pillar from Himeji Castle dating from the Meiji period restoration of the Tenshukaku (main tower). It is branded with the Yaki-in which reads Himeji Jo Ko-zai-in (Brand of the old wood from Himeji Castle). It has long been a method of raising funds in Japan to offer replaced pieces of a historical building to those who donate to the restoration. These pieces are commonly branded with a special seal, called a yaki-in, which is heated and burnt into the surface, stating from which famous building the Ko-zai or old material, comes from. This large piece also has on another side written “Keicho 5 (1602) Ikeda Terumasa Chikujo (Castle made by Ikeda Terumasa) Kokuho Himeji Jo Tenshukaku Kozai (Old material from the Main Tower of National Treasure Himeji Castle) Yonkai Ko-neta (4th Floor small joist). It is 89 cm (35 inches) tall, 12 x 13 cm (roughly 5 inches) square.
Himeji Castle dates to 1333 when Akamatsu Norimura built a fort on top of Himeyama hill. The fort was dismantled and rebuilt as Himeyama Castle in 1346 and then remodeled into Himeji Castle two centuries later. Himeji Castle was then significantly remodeled in 1581 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi, who added a three-story castle keep. In 1600, Tokugawa Ieyasu awarded the castle to Ikeda Terumasa for his help in the Battle of Sekigahara, and Ikeda completely rebuilt the castle from 1601 to 1609, expanding it into a large castle complex. Several buildings were later added to the castle complex by Honda Tadamasa from 1617 to 1618. For almost 700 years, Himeji Castle has remained intact, even throughout the bombing of Himeji in World War II, and natural disasters including the 1995 Great Hanshin earthquake. Himeji Castle is the largest and most visited castle in Japan, and it was registered in 1993 as one of the first UNESCO World Heritage Sites in the country and five structures of the castle are also designated National Treasures.
In 1873 (Meiji 6), many of Japan's castles were destroyed due to the Castle Abolition Ordinance as they were seen as symbols of the former government (Shogun) and were no longer necessary for defense, but around 1877 (Meiji 10), when the major changes at the beginning of the Meiji period had come to an end, there was born a movement to preserve the countries castles. At the request of Colonel Shigeto Nakamura, who oversaw construction and repairs in the Army, Himeji Castle was also preserved with national funds, including its large and small castle towers and turrets, along with Nagoya Castle (Unfortunately, Nagoya Castle was later burnt down in the war). following, temporary repairs were carried out, but due to lack of funding, full-scale renovation was postponed until 1910. At this time the large castle tower was repaired along with the remaining small castle towers (east small castle tower, west small castle tower, inui small castle tower) in the first phase of construction.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469135 (stock #L013)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Layer upon layer of lacquer has been carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the surface in a style known as Guri by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in a wooden box titled Guri Kobon. It is 23 x 33 cm (9 x 13 inches) and in excellent condition, the artist seal inlayed in mother of pearl beneath. The box is annotated by his adopted daughter and heir Torako (Suwa Sozan II).
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1930 item #1486011
The Kura
$2,000.00
A lovely tray in the shape of a split lotus leaf by Ito Tetsugai enclosed in a period wooden box titled Sencha Shiki Habon. It is roughly 53 x 25 cm (20-1/2 x 10 inches), expertly carved to be incredibly thin. Trays like these were used as decorative objects in the service of steeped green tea, and were very popular from the Meiji through early Showa eras.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Tea Articles : Pre 1980 item #1489294
The Kura
sold, thank you
A small ceramic box for carrying incense in the shape of a gingko leaf decorated with the single character Hana (flower) by Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 8 x 6 x 3 cm (roughly 3 x 2-1/4 x 1 inches) and is in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.
All Items : Artists : Ceramics : Pottery : Pre 1980 item #1489297
The Kura
sold, thank you
A black glazed bowl decorated with the Zen phrase Buji by Shimizu Hian enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 12.5 cm (5 inches) diameter, 8 cm (just more than 3 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It is signed on the side Hian followed by his age at 91 years old. Buji is a Japanese Zen Buddhist concept that can be translated as "nothing eventful" or "nothing lacking." It is often used to express a state of tranquility, contentment, or a sense of completeness. In the context of Zen philosophy, "Buji" suggests a state of being where one is free from desires, attachments, and the sense of lacking something. The idea behind "Buji" is rooted in mindfulness, meditation, and living in the present moment. It encourages individuals to let go of unnecessary worries, desires, and preoccupations, allowing them to fully embrace and appreciate the current moment without a sense of deficiency. In Zen practice, attaining a state of "Buji" is often associated with a deep understanding of the impermanence of life and the futility of clinging to material possessions or fleeting experiences. It promotes a more profound sense of inner peace and contentment by letting go of the constant pursuit of external validations and desires. While "Buji" is a term with specific relevance in the context of Zen Buddhism, its underlying message of finding contentment and peace in the present moment has broader applications and can be appreciated in various aspects of life.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style.