The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1800 item #1492274 (stock #K012)
The Kura
Price on Request
An incredible lacquered screen decorated with a Bugaku Dancer wearing an angry devil mask opposing a snake in incredibly thick relief opposite three gentlemen heating sake over a fire under the changing leaves of a maple, their oxcart off to the side. An inlaid cartouche near the snake reads Kan. The two-sided panel is set into a frame with matt black iron texture over a raw kiri-wood panel inset with three windows. It is 45 x 16.5 x 40.5 cm (18 x 6-1/2 x 16 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Haritsu Kenbyo. Off to the side a paper label gives a household collection number, and a further stamp shows it was recorded in an audit in Showa 14 (1939).
Ogawa Haritsu (1663-1747), also known as Ritsuo, one of the great individualists in the history of lacquer, was a poet as well as a painter, potter and lacquerer. Born into the samurai class, he renounced arms for the brush. In the 1680s, he became a disciple of the haiku poet Matsuo Basho (1644-1694). Haritsu turned to lacquer after 1707, the year his friends Hattori Ransetsu and Takarai Kikaku, both disciples of Basho, died. He adopted the art name Ritsuo, or "Old man in a torn bamboo hat," in 1712. The name suggests a poet or artist wandering carefree. A revival of interest in Haritsu's style and techniques during the 19th century is best exemplified in the copies of his work by Shibata Zeshin (1807-1891), the foremost Japanese lacquerer of the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1494516 (stock #K111(LAC037))
The Kura
Price on Request
A spectacular Meiji to Taisho period Golden box decorated with a spray of flowers under an imperial Chrysanthemum. The interior and bottom are elegant Nashiji, and the border between box and lid is protected by a solid silver rim. Kirigane cut gold flakes decorate the raised leaves. It comes enclosed in a custom made kiri-wood storage box. The gilded receptacle is 30 x 24.5 x 14 cm (12 x 9-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches) and it is in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Pre 1900 item #1491125 (stock #K011)
The Kura
$200.00
A small carved Zushi in the form of a cave housing a red stone in the shape of the Daruma, progenitor of Zen Buddhism in Japan. It is 6 x 4.2 x 8.3 cm (2-1/2 x 1-3/4 x 3-1/4 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, dating from the This would have been made as a talisman to ward off evil spirits. later Edo period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1910 item #1492916 (stock #K024)
The Kura
$320.00
A late 19th to early 20th century bottle, properly titled, I would say, Inbe Ito-me Heso Tokkuri or Bizen Thread textured Dimpled Bottle. A seal impressed into the base is partly illegible, but the characters Bizen-Inbe are clearly visible on the right, with the character tokoro (Place) bottom center and a name ending in Ro on the left. The vessel is 27 cm tall and in excellent condition. That size would make an excellent vase.
Also known as Ningyo Tokkuri, this type of bottle is usually dimpled on three sides with an image of one of the lucky gods, Ebisu, Daikoku, Hotei or Jurojin in one of the dimples. They have been popular since at least the 17th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1492596 (stock #K071B)
The Kura
$350.00
A set of three spouted nesting bowls decorated in the traditional Mugiwara pattern of alternating stripes of russet red, pale blue and orange emanating like rays from the center. The larger bowl is 9.5 cm (just under 4 inches) diameter, 5.5 cm (2 inches) tall. The smallest is roughly 7.5 diameter, 4.5 cm tall and all 3 are in excellent condition, enclosed in an old kiri-wood box.
This traditional pattern is called ``Mugiwarade'' because its vertical stripes resemble ears of wheat. It has three colored lines: green, red, and indigo and can be used regardless of the season. This pattern of regularly drawn lines was often used on utensils for daily use such as tea bowls, choko cups, and katakuchi cups. It is believed that they were made throughout Seto, including Shinano and Akatsu, from the late Edo period. Onita, which produces a brown color, is alternately painted with a paint called ``Akaraku,'' which produces a red or orange color, and Gosu, which produces an indigo color. You can see thick lines of red or indigo drawn with not just one, but two or even three thin brown lines between them. Drawing these lines at equal intervals and overlapping the lines thinly at the center (orientation) of the inside of the bowl or plate is one of the highlights of the craftsman's skill.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1490920
The Kura
$400.00
A porcelain bowl made by Mokusen of Kyoto decorated in blue with waterbirds taking flight from a reed-dotted shore followed by a four character verse by Oyabu Shunko enclosed in the original wooden box signed by both artists dating from the early 20th century. It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 9 cm 3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Mokusen was a prolific porcelain artist in Kyoto well known for his tea ware. Oyabu Shunko was born in Kyoto in 1901 and studied Nihonga under Yamamoto Shunkyo, exhibiting with the Bunten where his work was awarded Yusen.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1487535
The Kura
$450.00
Rich green glaze covers this elongated delicate undulating bottle from the Kosugi-yaki tradition of the Kaga region near modern day Kanazawa city. This bottle is roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Kosugi ware is a type of pottery that was produced in Kosugi Town over four generations for about 80 years, from around the early Bunka era (1810-1820) to the Meiji 20s (around 1890). In the hilly area south of Imizu City that connects Ikeda, Hirano, Ueno, and Hashimotojo, pottery was made in the Kofun period, Nara period, and Heian period, even before Kosugi ware began. This is probably because this area was rich in high-quality clay, which was the raw material for pottery, and red pine trees, which were used as fuel. From the first Yoemon to the fourth generation, pottery production was actively carried out in the former Kosugi Town (hereinafter referred to as Kosugi Town). The first generation Yoemon (given name Yoichiro) traveled throughout the land and mastered the technique of Soma ware (Fukushima prefecture), before returning to his hometown at the age of 30 to open a kiln. Kosugi ware rapidly spread its fame, and in the Tenpo era, it received a pottery license from the Kaga domain, and with the support of the county magistrate, reached its peak. The first Yoemon passed away in August 1838. The second generation Yoemon (young name Yojuro) took over at the age of 30. Many of the first-generation sake bottles were somewhat small, with a wonderful sculptural sense, and the green glaze had a beautiful color and luster that was slightly bright.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492087 (stock #K030)
The Kura
$470.00
A narrow open-mouthed vessel decorated with autumnal trees by Ito Tozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The piece could serve as a vase, but comes with a black lacquered wooden lid and is titled Mizusashi, making it rightfully a fresh water jar for the Japanese Tea Ceremony. It is 11.7 cm (4-3/4 inches) diameter 22 cm (9 inches) tall and in excellent condition, likely dating from the 1950s.
Ito Tozan I (1846-1920) began as a painter in the Maruyama school studying under Koizumi Togaku. In 1862 he became a pupil of Kameya Kyokutei, as well as studying under Takahashi Dohachi III and Kanzan Denshichi (who made the dishes for the imperial table). In 1867, with the fall of the Edo government, he opened his kiln in Eastern Kyoto. Much prized at home, he was also recognized abroad at the Amsterdam, Paris and Chicago World Expositions. With an emphasis on Awata and Asahi wares of Kyoto, he began to use the name Tozan around 1895. In 1917 he was named a member of the Imperial Art Academy, one of only five potters ever given that title, and like his teacher Denshichi, created the dishes from which the Imperial family would eat. He worked very closely with his adopted son, Ito Tozan II (1871-1937). He too began life as a painter, but his talent was seen by Tozan I, who adopted him and converted him to pottery, where he both succeeded and excelled as a member of one of Kyotos most well known pottery families. Miki Hyoetsu I was born in 1877, establishing a line of craftsman which lasts to this day. He was exhibited at the Shotoku Taishi Ten and Paris World Exposition among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1492071 (stock #K026)
The Kura
$495.00
Gold forms a billowing pine tree lavishly applied to the dark lacquered body of this wooden water jar enclosed in the original wooden box titled Ikkan Mage-Mizusashi, Oimatsu signed by both the wood craftsman and the lacquer artist. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter 16cm tall and in excellent condition, dating from the early 20th century.
The term Ikkan in the title is after Hirai Ikkan, who mastered the technique of creating lacquered receptacles of thin bent and glued wood which were incredibly durable and did not warp or deform with time.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1492338 (stock #K056)
The Kura
$495.00
The outside of this elegantly understated container is simply semitransparent red lacquer over cloth in the Tame-nuri style opening to reveal an interior glowing with large patches of applied gold and silver. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) square, 10 cm (4 inches) tall and in overall excellent condition, with minor marks from use on the bottom. Inside the box is contained a number of papers as well as a receipt from the late Meiji period, circa 1910.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1493651 (stock #K059)
The Kura
$500.00
Something wild remains in the expression of this quiet little creature hiding away from human eyes. It is Bizen pottery, dating from the 19th to early 20th century, when Saikumono sculptural works were at their peak of production. It is 10.5 x 17.5 x 10.5 cm (4 x 7-1/2 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The beauty of Bizen pottery lies in its adherence to wood-fired kilns. The firing process is crucial, as it allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Saiku-mono or figurative pottery works were very popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and that tradition still exists today. Simplicity of form, often inspired by nature and everyday objects, enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1492362 (stock #K057)
The Kura
$550.00
Gargoyle or bat-like dragon-esque creatures spread their wings among tendrils of flame on the heavily decorated blue sides of this large pair of 19th century Sometsuke Japanese nesting bowls. Within boats ply the placid waters. The larger bowl is 24.5 cm (just less than 10 inches) diameter,10cm (4 inches) tall. The smaller is 21 cm diameter, 10cm tall and both are in excellent condition, dating from the 19th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1493633 (stock #K149)
The Kura
$550.00
A cluster of Blue and White Edo period Imari bowls which melted together in the inferno and fused, three becoming one in a fortuitous accident. The Japanese have long held these flaws in high esteem, accentuating the ideas of Wabi-sabi and the ephemeral which permeate Japanese culture. Roughly 24 x 16 x 8 cm (9-1/2 x 6 x 3 inches), a very interesting addition to the table.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1980 item #1489298 (stock #L122)
The Kura
$650.00
Water streams between the verdant hills on this lurid landscape by 20th century artist Shimizu Hian. Ink on paper completely remounted in silk with black lacquer rollers. The poem reads: Hana chirite Arui ha, Samuki hi mo arinu, Haru no Yukue no shizuka nari keru (Early flowers have fallen and the cold lingers, nonetheless Spring quietly approaches). It is 63 x 129 cm (25 x 51 inches) and in excellent condition.
Shimizu Hian (1883-1975) was a popular poet and painter of the early modern period born in Takahashi City, the grandson of the feudal lord a Bicchu-Matsuyama castle. He created his own unique form of expression combining three arts, poetry, calligraphy, and painting. He graduated law studies from the prestigious Kyoto University, and took a position in Kobe District Court. A social activist, from there he wandered through various positions, bank clerk, office worker, mayor of a small town. Shimizu followed the traditional style of literati calligraphy and painting, while at the same time creating a completely new way of expression. At the age of 84, he became a household name when he was chosen to be the master of ceremonies at the opening of the Imperial Poetry Reading Ceremony。His paintings were lauded by such greats as Kawai Gyokudo and Konoshima Keika, and he was a true literati in life style. Work by him is held in the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, The National Museum of Asian Art (Freer Sackler Branch) of the Smithsonian in Washington DC, Okayama Prefectural Museum
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1980 item #1492240 (stock #K042)
The Kura
$650.00
A spiraling form in softly gleaming golden brown by Yajima Boshu enclosed in the original singed wooden box titled simply Jundo Kabin (Pure Bronze Vase). It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 27.5 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the base with a silver cartouche.
Yajima Boshu (1925-2001) was born in Takaoka, one of the most important bronze producing regions in Japan. He was first exhibited at the 13th National Traditional Crafts Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kogei Ten) in 1966, and exhibited consistently with that venue. He received top prize in 1968 at the 7th Toyama Traditional Crafts Exhibition. He exhibited at the 1st National Traditional Ne Metal Artist Exhibition (Nihon Dento Kinko Shinsaku-ten) and was awarded top prize there in both 1973 and 1974, the start of a highly lauded career.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1930 item #1492917 (stock #K089)
The Kura
$650.00
A set of five lacquer lined covered bowls made from natural gourds enclosed in an age darkened wooden box titled Hyo Suimono Wan indicating they are for serving thin soup to cleanse the palate between courses. In Japanese cuisine, presentation is everything. Texture and color may in fact be more important than flavor. The dishes used as well, should be a feast for the eyes, and you will find every aspect of the traditional meal is presented in its own unique setting. These bowls are 7 to 8.5 cm (roughly 3 inches plus) diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and all are in excellent condition. According to Arigatojapan, Suimono, literally meaning 'dish to sip,' is a refreshing type of clear soup that is meant to cleanse the palate in between dishes. Often very light and slightly umami in taste, it is one of the oldest and most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1493844 (stock #K112)
The Kura
$680.00
A hand painted cloth banner decorated with imagery by various artists including the Nanga School literati artists Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) and Nakanishi Koseki (1807-1884) as well as Tanaka Koha of the Kagetsuan School of Sencha and Confucian scholar Goto Shoin (1797-1864) and Hirose Kyokuso (1807-1863) who were two of the most important followers of Rai Sanyo. The date Konoe-saru (year of the monkey in metal) is visible in both the central leaf and the lower left gourd image. Judging then by the 60 year cyclical zodiac calendar it dates from the fifth month of 1860. The title, signed Shochiku-Rojin (the old man Shochiku), reads Betsu-yu-ten-chi-hi-jin-kan, a poetic phrase meaning there are other worlds aside from that of the human plane, specifically alluding to a world without human desire. Perhaps when these learned gentlemen gathered for tea beyond this curtain, they felt that they had experienced one of these other worlds. The cloth is 91 x 160 cm (36 x 63 inches) including a pouch through which a bamboo stave would have been run for hanging. Toned somewhat with age, the fibers are strong
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1980 item #1492876 (stock #K083)
The Kura
$700.00
Pink, purple and red glazes mingle on the surface of this Mizusashi water jar by Matsuyama Gae enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kujaku-yu Mizusashi and signed inside the lid by the Urasenke Konnichi-an Grand Tea Master, Sen Genshitsu. It is 20.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 12 cm (5 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Gae I Returned from China in 1945, where he had been posted for eight years and had studied in depth ancient Chinese ceramics. In 1947 he opened his own kiln and immediately won acclaim, as well as the Mayors award for Kobe in 1948. Working together with his wife they developed this glaze through trial and error in 1951. Several pieces were collected by the Imperial Household agency in 1953 and 1954, and a vase was sent as a gift to then President Eisenhower in 1960. During this time they received many awards and presented at a great many exhibitions. Gae died in 1963 of cancer, and after one year of mourning, Tsutako continued the name and work. She continued to exhibit and was again accepted into the Imperial collection in 1964, and was also featured at the World Exposition in 1970 held in Osaka. When she passes away her daughter continued the family tradition, becoming the third and last Matsuyama Gae. Sen Genshitsu was born in Kyoto on April 19, 1923, as the first son of the 14th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Mugensai. His given name was Masaoki. He served as Urasenke Iemoto for thirty-eight years, up to the end of 2002, when he transferred the title and the hereditary name Soshitsu that goes with it to his eldest son, Zabosai. At that time, he changed his own name from Soshitsu to Genshitsu, and he became referred to by the title Daisosho, signifying his status as the once grand master. After serving as a pilot in the Airforce division of the Japanese navy during WWII, and then completing his temporarily interrupted university education at Doshisha University, Kyoto, graduating from the Faculty of Economics, he took Buddhist vows under Goto Zuigan, chief abbot of Daitokuji temple, and received the Buddhist names Hounsai Genshu Soko. In 1950, he was confirmed as heir apparent of Mugensai, and thus became referred to by the title Wakasosho. He made his first trip abroad that year, to Hawaii and the USA, and since then he has made more than three hundred trips abroad and been to more than sixty countries. He lived in Hawaii in 1952, during which time he lectured at and also took courses at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, beginning his long and dedicated association with that university. Upon Mugensai’s death in 1964, he succeeded as the 15th-generation Urasenke iemoto, Hounsai. He is widely known as a global-minded promoter both of the culture embraced by the Way of Tea and of World Peace. Among his many awards and recognitions, in 1997, he was awarded the Order of Culture by the Emperor of Japan.