The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1960 item #1440490 (stock #MOR7831)
The Kura
Price on Request
Plovers of carved mother of pearl shell and powdered gold soar over silver foam capped crashing waves surrounding a led rock inlayed into the surface of this spectacular lacquered box exhibited at the 3rd Aichi Prefectural Crafts Exhibition by Sakamoto Kakutaro wrapped in silk and enclosed in the original wooden box. Hira-maki-e, Taka-Maki-e, Kirigane, inlays of lead and shell on a nashiji ground, with silver fitted rims. It contains a black lacquered ink stone with gold edges and round water dropper which are set into a black lacquered “raft” sprinkled lightly with silver flakes. The box is 23.5 x 20.5 x 4 cm (9-1/4 x 8 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition. The artist’s name card is affixed to the lid of the box, and contained within are a card reading: 3rd Aichi Prefectural Craft Exhibition (Dai San Kai Aichi Ken Kogeihin Tenrankai) as well as a stamp noting the item number from the exhibition (The exhibition was held in 1926). The same stamps are affixed to the bottom corner of the lacquer box.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1940 item #1439336 (stock #MOR8072)
The Kura
$400.00
A Pottery dish covered in cream colored lacquer decorated with a silver rim and scattered silver plum blossoms enclosed in the original signed wooden box dating from the early 20th century (Taisho to early Showa era). The writing is very difficult to discern, it would appear to be titled Ume-moyo Kashiki, however the first line is challenging. The bowl is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter 5.5 cm (2-1/4 inches) tall and in fine condition, with some wear to the rim. Inside the writing is also not easy to read, the stamp reads Nihon Kogei Shokai no in (Seal of the Japan Crafts Association).
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1439293 (stock #MOR8070)
The Kura
$400.00
An exquisite tray of clear grained kiri wood cut very thin and perfectly joined with a hanchiku (diseased bamboo) rim painted with butterflies by Kawakita Kaho enclosed in the original signed wooden box. On the underside of the storage box is a stamp containing the character Yama (mountain) likely by the Sashimono-shi craftsman who created the tray. The tray is 22.5 cm (9 inches) square and in perfect condition. Kawakita kaho (1875-1940) was boorn in Kyoto and studied painting under the Great 19th century master Kono Bairei and Kikuchi Hobun. He frequently exhibited at the Bunten/Teiten National Exhibitions where he garnered several prizes and eventually served as a juror. He is remembered for scenes from Japanese legends depicted in a mixture of Shijo-style and Western realism.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Okimono : Pre 1960 item #1438662 (stock #MOR8067)
The Kura
$450.00
A minimalist hakudo okimono by Hiramatsu Koshun dating circa 1960 enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is roughly 1 foot (30.5 cm) long and in overall excellent condition. Born in Nagano, Hiramatsu Koshun was one of the top rated bronze artists of the Showa period. He learned the art of metalwork under Katsura Koshun (Mitsuharu) and Umino Kiyoshi. His work was represented at the Nitten where he received the Hokuto-sho prize among many others and was bequeathed to the Nitten and purchased by Japanese governmental ministries for gifts to dignitaries.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1960 item #1438545 (stock #MOR8065)
The Kura
$945.00
Flying fish leap soar through tempestuous waves in raised relief on this wide open murashido bronze signed on the base Takusai. It is 10 inches (25 cm) diameter, 7-1/2 inches (19 cm) tall. Stylistically it is consistent with works from the early to mid century, immediately before and after the Second World War, and is likely the work of the third generation.
The Takusai family have long been known for their lost wax casting technique. Honma Takusa I (1812-1891) learned metalcraft under Obata Dosai manufacturing armaments, but began manufacturing art and scholar objects under the tutelage of Sakuma Zozan after the Meiji restoration in 1868. He is credited with having developed the patinating technique known now as Murashido (a mottled surface of various colors and textures). Takusai II worked hand in hand with his father, and followed very closely the lineage of his forebearer. Honma Takusai III (Otohachi, 1868-1946) was the son of Honma Gihei and apprenticed under Takusai II, succeeding the name after the death of his mentor. His work was widely exhibited and lauded in his lifetime. The fourth generation was the son of Takusai III, and attended the prestigious Tokyo University of Art Sculpture Department before returning to carry on the family tradition but is credited with bringing the family oeuvre forward. His second son became Takusai V, after returning from the Russian Gulags following the second world war; his elder brother died in the conflict. Along with the family’s various traditions, The fifth generation incorporated the techniques of Saito Gyokujo into the family repertoire while keeping a strong presence in both sculpture, and maintaining the Murashido tradition. The 6th generation graduated Musashino University of Art and apprenticed under Living National Treasure Saito Akira before returning to Sado in 1982 to take up the mantle under his father.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1437940 (stock #TCR8061)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
Verdant foliage of the Imperial Paulownia (Kiri) tree in crisp cobalt rises majestically on this tall vase by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seika Kiri no Zu Kabin (Blue and White Vase with Paulownia Design). It is 30 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, signed on the base.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1437855 (stock #TCR8059)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
The Shishimai dance tradition is common throughout east Asia. A single, or sometimes a pair of dancers, don the costume and parade through the street biting people, especially children, on the head. This is believed to ward off misfortune and evil spirits, and make a child overcome fear. An incense burner by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan in the shape of a shrouded Lion Dancer in vibrant colors enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei-I Shishimai Gata Koro. The koro is 14 cm (roughly 5-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1437778 (stock #TCR8056)
The Kura
$1,800.00
Raw, baked earth and crystalline green glaze like wet moss, Iga ceramics have long been highly praised in Japan for their simplicity and natural beauty. Green glass clings to the side of this large Iga-yaki pot by Miyagawa Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 9 inches (22 cm) tall, 8 inches (20 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. Also a second vase of the same ceramic style in an elongated form with a natural vine shaped handle. This vase is 12 inches (31 cm) tall, 4-1/2 inches (11.5 cm) diameter and in excellent condition. Stamped on the base, it has no box. These are part of a large collection of works by Kozan we recently acquired, several of which have been published. For additional photos please contact me.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1437776 (stock #TCR8054)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A large trumpeting bulb in blue-green celadon glaze with snake-like handles by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Koshiki Ryu-mimi Kabin (Celadon Glazed Flaring Dragon Handled Vase). It is 29 cm (roughly 12 inches) tall, 19.5 cm (8 inches) diameter and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1437775 (stock #TCR4427)
The Kura
$995.00
Sale Pending
A black-eyed shrimp nestles into the sandy body of this open Iga vessel by Miyagawa Kozan capped with a crystalline green fissured glaze cascading from the rim. It is 9 inches (22 cm) tall and is in fine condition. There is no box. For a similar piece see the book Makuzu Kozan Ten (1986) figure 61.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1437673 (stock #TCR8053)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A small Sencha tea pot by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Shonzui-i Kyusu (Celadon with Blue and White Decoration Tea Pot). The decoration is of the character for fortune (Kotobuki) alternating with the four friends of winter (Shikunshi, Chrysanthemum, Pine, Bamboo and Plum) under foam green celadon. It is roughly 11 cm (4-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1940 item #1437672 (stock #TCR8052)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A small ivory colored Sencha tea pot by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Haku Korai-I Ho-Karakusa Kyusu (Phoenix and Scrolling Vines Tea Pot in White Korean Style). Signed with a cartouche inside the lid, with an impressed seal in the base. It is roughly 9 cm (3-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1437599 (stock #TCR4802)
The Kura
$1,500.00
A large round vase by Miyagawa Kozan, the raw clay with a swirl of dark glaze decorated with Sasa bamboo in overglaze enamel enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 9 inches (23 cm) diameter. There as a mar on the raw earth surface (see close-up photo).
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1437577 (stock #TCR8050)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
And now our Jolly traveler moves along on foot, dragging behind him a voluminous sack decorated with symbols of prosperity. Another rare work by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan; as with the last Koro, this is a piece I have yet to see the likes of after more than 20 years dealing in Japanese art. It is 23 cm (9 inches) long and in excellent condition and comes enclosed in a later wooden box.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1437575 (stock #TCR8048)
The Kura
Sold, Thank you!
A jolly sage astride a lumbering ox (symbol of this year!) by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Utsushi Ushi Jinbutsu Gata Koro (Ninsei style Censer in the shape of Ox and Person). It is 13 cm long and in perfect condition. For a nearly identical work see Miyagawa Kozan and the World of Makuzu Ware, figure 140 (Jap. 2001) or the biblical tome Teishitsu Gigei-in Makuzu Kozan, fig 205 (Jap. 2004).
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1940 item #1436804 (stock #MOR8047)
The Kura
$300.00
A small wooden case covered in tame-nuri lacquer decorated with a branch of bamboo by Kamisaka Sekka bound with the original yellow chord and enclosed in the original wooden box. In combination with a few other works we are currently offering by Sekka, this would be an interesting look into his world of design. This is 38 x 7.5 cm (15 x 3-1/4 inches). It has been well used, with a seperation of the joint in the corner and wear to the surface. See close-up photos.
Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942) is the godfather of 20th century Japanese design and the Rimpa revival. He was born in Kyoto in 1866, one of six siblings. From 1882 he began his artistic career, however did not take-off until visiting the Paris Expo in 1901, where he was exposed to Art Nouveau and Western industrial design concepts. He was adept as a painter and designer in an assortment of other media, working with various artisans to bring to life his ideas. He was employed as a teacher at the Kyoto Municipal School of Art (future University of Fine Art), and was widely exhibited and prized throughout his career, which ended in retirement in 1938. For more see the afore mentioned Kamisaka Sekka: Rimpa Master - Pioneer of Modern Design by Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art 2003, Kamisaka Sekka: Rinpa Traditionalist, Modern Designer by Andreas Marks, 2012 or Kamisaka Sekka: Dawn of Modern Japanese Design by Khanh Trinh, 2012.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1436771 (stock #AOR6758)
The Kura
$800.00
Pines in rich pigments march down the page on this card by Kamisaka Sekka painted over silk gilded with genuine gold. It is 9-1/2 x 10-3/4 inches (24 x 27 cm). There are marks around the edges typical of handling.
Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942) is the godfather of 20th century Japanese design and the Rimpa revival. He was born in Kyoto in 1866, one of six siblings. From 1882 he began his artistic career, however did not take-off until visiting the Paris Expo in 1901, where he was exposed to Art Nouveau and Western industrial design concepts. He was adept as a painter and designer in an assortment of other media, working with various artisans to bring to life his ideas. He was employed as a teacher at the Kyoto Municipal School of Art (future University of Fine Art), and was widely exhibited and prized throughout his career, which ended in retirement in 1938.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Textiles : Pre 1940 item #1436768 (stock #MOR6954)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
Two silk Fukusa wrapping cloths designed and or hand painted by Kamisaka Sekka enclosed in the original signed wooden box dating from the Taisho period. The first is an emboridered wrapping cloth with patterns of flowers and grasses designed by Sekka, 13 x 14 inches (33 x 35.5 cm) in excellent condition complete with red cloth obi. For an identical piece see Kamisaka Sekka: Rimpa Master - Pioneer of Modern Design by Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art 2003 p. 103 fig 23. The second is white satin hand painted with lotus, 13-1/2 x 15 inches (34.5 x 38 cm). There is some typical age staining from contact with the wood box. For a similar piece from the Sherman Lee collection (now housed in Minneapolis) see the same book, page 112 figure 39. A very rare opportunity to acquire two museum quality works by this master.
Kamisaka Sekka (1866-1942) is the godfather of 20th century Japanese design and the Rimpa revival. He was born in Kyoto in 1866, one of six siblings. From 1882 he began his artistic career, however did not take-off until visiting the Paris Expo in 1901, where he was exposed to Art Nouveau and Western industrial design concepts. He was adept as a painter and designer in an assortment of other media, working with various artisans to bring to life his ideas. He was employed as a teacher at the Kyoto Municipal School of Art (future University of Fine Art), and was widely exhibited and prized throughout his career, which ended in retirement in 1938. For more see the afore mentioned Kamisaka Sekka: Rimpa Master - Pioneer of Modern Design by Kyoto National Museum of Modern Art 2003, Kamisaka Sekka: Rinpa Traditionalist, Modern Designer by Andreas Marks, 2012 or Kamisaka Sekka: Dawn of Modern Japanese Design by Khanh Trinh, 2012.