The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
In accordance with the requests of local authorities our Kyoto gallery will be closed to visitors from April 14th until further notice.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1700 item #1431009 (stock #MOR7969)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
Tempestuous waves in fine gold lines splash between lightning shapes decorated with reed curtains on the sides of this singular lacquered wooden koro with woven silver lid dating from the Momoyama to opening of the Edo period, Later 16th to early 17th century. It is 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) high, 7.5 cm (3 inches) diameter. The worn base has been re-lacquered to protect the wood core from splitting or cracking otherwise is entirely original to the period.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1412482 (stock #TCR7009)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A crab crawls among the awa plants burgeoning with seed on the side of this Kyo-yaki vessel by Takahashi Dohachi with the painting performed by Itsuun which appears to be dated 1836 in the 60 year lunar cycle. It comes enclosed in a period wooden box annotated by Dohachi VI. It is 10-3/4 inches (27 cm) tall and in excellent condition. The box inscription reads: Itsuun Kani Ga (Image of Crab by Itsuun) Sendai Dohachi Zo Kabin (Vase made by previous generation Dohachi) and inside: Kachutei Rokusei Dohachi Kan (Attested by Kachutei Dohachi VI).
The only Itsuun I know of is Kinoshita Itsuun (1798-1866); a trained doctor and nanga artist of the late Edo period from Nagasaki. Very popular in his home town, he also went to Kyoto where he learned the Shijo and Yamato-e styles of painting and would have associated there with the likes of Dohachi in the literati circles.
The Dohachi Kiln was established in Awataguchi by a retainer of Kameyama fief, Takahashi Dohachi I around 1760, and the name Dohachi was brought to the forefront of porcelain and ceramic production by the second generation head of the family who attained an imperial following, and grew to be one of the most famous potters of the Later Edo period to come from Kyoto. Ninnami Dohachi (1783-1855) was born the second son of Takahashi Dohachi I. Following the early death of his older brother he succeeded the family name, opening a kiln in the Gojo-zaka area of Kyoto (at the foot of Kiyomizu temple) in 1814. Well known for research into and perfection of ancient Chinese and Korean forms long held in high esteem in Japan, and at the same time working to expand the family reputation within tea circles. Along with contemporaries Aoki Mokubei and Eiraku Hozen became well known as a master of porcelain as well as Kenzan and Ninsei ware. Over the following decades he would be called to Takamatsu, Satsuma, Kishu and other areas to consult and establish kilns for the Daimyo and Tokugawa families as well as Nishi-Honganji Temple. An exhibition was held at the Suntory Museum in 2014 centering on this artist, and he is also held in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Kyoto National Museum among many, many others. The third generation (1811-1879) was known as Kachutei Dohachi and continued the work of his father, producing an abundance of Sencha tea ware and other porcelain forms, maintaining the highest of standards and ensuring the family place in the annals of Kyoto ceramics.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1408940 (stock #L079)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
The golden orb shines out like the light of Buddhism from between the dark clouds on this exquisite 19th century image by Wada Gozan, priest of Jinko-in Temple. Ink and gold-pigment on silk in a patterned silk border with wood rollers in a period kiri-wood box titled Tsuki no ga Yokomono Ippuku (1 wide painting of moon) Wada Gozan koto (of Wada Gozan), annotated by Kuten. It is 25 x 48-1/2 inches (63.5 x 123.5 cm) and is in overall fine condition, with a minor wrinkle in the lower border. Wada Gozan (the art name of priest Gesshin 1800-1870) was a close associate of poet and artist Otagaki Rengetsu and they were known to collaborate on many occasions. She spent much of her final years in his temple Jinko-in.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1423336 (stock #TCR7834)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
An exceptional boxed set of sake cups made by Seifu Yohei III lined with silver by Nakagawa Joeki (IX or X) enclosed in the original compartmentalized kiri-wood box signed by both artists. Each cup is unique, silver on blue, gold on red, and green on yellow, each stamped by the artist and displaying the celebratory Plum, Pine and Bamboo (Shochikubai) motif. They are 2-12 inches (6.3 cm) diameter each and in excellent condition.
Seifu Yohei III (1851-1914) was the adopted son of Yohei II. Sent at the age of twelve to study painting under then the top Nanga artist Tanomura Chokunyu, he returned in 1865 due to illness. The next year he entered as an apprentice the Seifu studio, then under the control of the second generation. As so often happens in these situations, in 1872 he married the daughter, becoming a “Yoji” or adopted son of Yohei II and taking the family name, established himself as an individual artist. Within the year his genius was discovered, and works by him were sent to the Vienna World Exposition. Seifu II retires of illness in 1878, and III succeeds the family kiln. Once again he is honored as the new head of the kiln to produce the dinnerware for the former president of the US Ulysses Grant. His work was highly acclaimed, both domestically and abroad, drawing honors and prizes at the Naikoku Hakurankai (National Exhibition), Chicago and Paris World expositions and being named one of the first members of the Imperial Art Academy specializing in ceramics in 1893 (Tei shitsu Gigei In). Works by this rare artist are held in Museums and collections throughout the world. He was succeeded by the fourth generation Seifu (1871-1951) in 1914.
Likely by Nakagawa Joeki IX (1849-1911), he became the head of the Nakagawa family, a lineage of Kyoto artists who had specialized mainly in making utensils for the tea ceremony at a time when support for the Tea Ceremony reached unprecedented lows. This was due to the association of Tea with the former ruling class. Nakagawa Joeki received the support of the Mitsui family to compensate for the loss of traditional patronage during the Meiji era and is remembered for creating highly accomplished works. Nakagawa Junsaburo (Joeki X, 1880-1940) was the took the reins in 1911, He headed the line from1911-1940, covering the reign of 3 emperors, he was greatly favored by tea masters at the time.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1920 item #1426926 (stock #TCR7894)
The Kura
Sold, with thanks!
Iron laced with tinges of blue decorates the rim, flowing into the bowl of these five abalone shaped dishes from 19th century Takatori in central Kyushu enclosed in a beautiful age darkened kiri-wood box titled Awabi Mukozuke Go Kyaku Takatori Yaki (Five Abalone Shaped Dishes from Takatori). Each is roughly 9.5 x 12.5 cm (4 x 5 inches) and each bears the “Taka” stamp beneath. No post-firing damage. One has a pre-firing chip in the rim, another a firing flaw visible in the bottom, it does not go through.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1426887 (stock #TCR7892)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
A collection of six unique antique sake cups from various regions in Japan, each enclosed in an old wooden box.
1. A rice bale shaped Kosobe yaki bowl in thin bluish-white glaze stamped on the base, probably second or third generation (see below).
2. A Soma Yaki small bowl of pinched form with speckled green glaze from Fukushima. Soma Yaki has a four-hundred-year history.
3. A very rare Etchu Kosugi Yaki wangata cup in smooth blue green glaze with a hint of yellow at the rim.
4. Another very rare Garyuzan-yaki cup incised with white slip in basket style by Yokohagi Ikko (1850-1924) in a signed box.
5. A later Edo Korean style piece with gold repairs by Mizukoshi Yosobei bearing his five-sided seal impressed into the base (the kiln closed in 1860).
And last an anonymous celadon piece whose title I cannot read (appears to be Kyudai seiji).
The Kosobe kiln was established in Takatsuki, along the route between Osaka and Kyoto by Igarashi Shinbei sometime around 1790, The first generation (1750-1829) was known for Raku wares, Tea Utensils and Utsushi wares among more common household items. The second generation (Shinzo, 1791-1851) is remembered for Takatori, Karatsu, Korai and other continental styles. Shingoro, the third-generation head of the family (1833-1882) continued in that line, but secured a route to use Shigaraki clay and blended that with his local clays. He was known for Mishima and E-gorai styles. Into the Meiji period, the 4th generation head Yasojiro (1851-1918) saw the kiln close due to health problems of his successor Shinbei V, (Eitaro) in the late Meiji or early Taisho period.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1940 item #1411801 (stock #ANR7004)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
The village headman aims his arrows at the moon to dispel the evil brought on by a solar eclipse, the village women in the background standing in prayer. This scene was painted by Higuchi Tomimaro for show at the Seikosha Exhibition held in Osaka in 1938. It is an excellent look into the world of the Ainu, a native culture to Northern Japan now lost to history. He has done a wonderful job conveying the texture of the clothing, and hidden behind the grayish background is textures of floral life, only visible by shadow, an interesting and unusual technique. Pigment on paper in a simple black lacquered wooden frame with elegant metal hardware. Each screen is 186 x 169.5 cm (73 x 67 inches). They have been completely remounted without any over-painting, and are ready for the next hundred years.
Higuchi Tomimaro (1898-1981) was born in Osaka and studied under Kitano Tsunetomi from around 1910. He began exhibiting with the Bunten National Exhibition in 1915, with his painting Tsuyasan, followed by works in 1917,18 and 19. He would then switch to the Inten, exhibiting there from 1923 to 1930. At this time, he began producing Hanga woodblock prints along with Takehisa Yumeji for the Senryu magazine. In 1925 he would be accepted into the Shotoku Taishi Exhibition. In the later 20s he fell into the circle of Nishiyama Suisho and switched to the Seikosha Salon as well as moving back to exhibiting with the reorganized Teiten National Exhibition. Much lauded in his lifetime, he is remembered for Bijin-ga images of beauties and genre scenes in his youth, and Buddhist imagery in his later years. Work is held in the Kyoto Municipal Museum of Art, the Osaka Nakanoshima Musuem among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Korean : Ceramics : Pre 1900 item #1433226 (stock #MOR7993)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
An extensive amount of gold has been expended in the repair of this Joseon period White Korean Jar with elevated rim cascading to a narrow shoulder and slender waste, tapering dramatically at the base. It dates from the 18th to 19th century, and was once shattered and has been re-assembled using lacquer and gold powder. It is 16 inches (41 cm) tall and a striking object which will certainly garner a lot of attention.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1940 item #1401496 (stock #TCR6944)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A Bizen pottery incense burner by important 20th century artist Nishimura Shunko enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Bizen Nemureru Shishi Koro. Very much in this famous artist style, the recumbent creature appears squat, all features elongated, while a cub riding on its back serves as the lid for the incense chamber. It is signed on the base Shunko-saku and bears his double mountain mark. The mark is visible in the 1927 booklet Bizen Toko (copies included) The koro is 7 inches ((17.5 cm) long and in excellent condition.
Nishimura Shunko (Yasujiro, 1886-1953) was, along with Kaneshige Toyo and Mimura Tokei one of the three pillars of Bizen pottery during the first half of the 20th century, and one credited with saving it from extinction. Born in Kyoto, he studied Japanese Painting before moving to study Awata Yaki pottery techniques under Aoyama Shunko (from whom he received his name) and then under the first Suwa Sozan. He moved to Inbe (Okayama Prefecture, home of Bizen) in 1909, where he established a kiln and became known for saiku-mono or ceramic sculptures. His genius was quickly recognized, and his works were collected by the Imperial family and given as gfts to foreign dignitaries. He served as a ceramics instructor for two years in Korea during the Taisho period. He also taught potters like Urakami Zenji (1914-2006). He was named a bearer of intangible cultural properties for his lifes work in 1942. Several works by him are held in the Okayama Prefectural Museum of Art.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1416033 (stock #MOR7072)
The Kura
Sold, with thanks!
A decidedly different version of this theme, a Festive carved wooden Tai (Red Snapper) fish with removable side for sashimi coated inside in gold with bone teeth and inlayed bone eyes. The craftsman ahs gone to great lengths to make this as realistic as possible, from the textures of the skin to the folds in the fins and coloring. Unusually, most dishes in this vein are one sided, however this is equally realistically carved on both sides. It is 47 x 21 x 6 cm (18-1/2 x 8 x 2-1/2 inches and is in overall excellent, antique condition.
It may seem strange, but the red snapper is a representative good luck "charm." There are two reasons. One, the pronunciation of red snapper (Tai) is the same as the end of the word for "fortunate" or "worthy of celebration" (Medetai), and two, the red snapper is known for living a much longer life than other fish and is seen as a symbol of long life. In fact, the deity Ebisu-sama is most often depicted holding a red snapper under one arm.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Chinese : Pottery : Pre 1700 item #1428438 (stock #TCR7912)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
Four hand made lugs circle the neck of this squat tea jar (Cha Tsubo) covered in an opaque, dark-tea-colored glaze dating likely from the Sung-Yuan (Southern Song to Yuan Dynasty; Kamakura to Muromachi in Japan). A large dimple mars one side, accentuating the ideal of imperfection and asymmetry. There are no straight lines in nature. Retaining the antique bung originally wrapped in now dilapidated cloth. It is 22 cm (8-3/4 inches) diameter, roughly the same height and in fine condition.
Eight hundred years ago, tea was rare in Japan. It arrived from China in simple, ceramic storage jars. But once the workaday storage jugs reached Japan, they became objects of aesthetic contemplation and, often, reverence. One of those jars — a big brown jug called Chigusa in the Smithsonian's Sackler Gallery in Washington, D.C., is one such jar. In the 16th century, a tea ritual arose around them. At that time To be politically also meant that you had to show that you had sophistication as well. Unlike earlier times, when overtly decorated Chinese wares were popular, the appreciation of beauty born in the Muromachi/Momyama period stressed frugality and simplicity, a humble aesthetic unique to Japan, and these jars, along with simple Korean rice bowls, were the perfect accompaniment to the modest confines of the spaces made to contain them.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1436064 (stock #MOR8018)
The Kura
$700.00
A set of 10 variously colored covered lacquer bowls with accompanying small plates ostensibly for pickles and suimono to cleanse the palate between courses. In Japanese cuisine, presentation is everything. Texture and color may in fact be more important than flavor. The dishes used as well, should be a feast for the eyes, and you will find every aspect of the traditional meal is presented in its own unique setting. These bowls (two matching boxed sets of five) are 7.5 cm diameter, 7 cm tall (roughly 3 inches) and all are in excellent condition dating from the early 20th century.
The inscription on the box lid simply states Five Colored Small Bowls. On the side has been added Five Colored Shiruko-wan, indicating that someone used them for Shiruko deserts as well. According to Arigatojapan, Suimono, literally meaning 'dish to sip,' is a refreshing type of clear soup that is meant to cleanse the palate in between dishes. Often very light and slightly umami in taste, it is one of the oldest and most traditional foods in Japanese cuisine. Shiruko is a sweet porridge of boiled Azuki beans, often served with chestnut, rice cake or dumplings.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1430142 (stock #MOR7949)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A pair of unorthodox Edo period guardian corbels in the shape of mythical lion-like creatures (Shishi) made to be notched into a corner under the eaves of Shinto and Buddhist temples to ward off evil spirits. Ordinarily just the heads are carved, these are unusual in that their fore-paws have also been depicted, granting a greater sense of movement than most. Carved Hinoki (cypress), they are 30 x 18 x 20 cm (12 x 7 x 8 inches) each and in overall fine condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1930 item #1428891 (stock #MOR7920)
The Kura
Sold, thank you!
A Tamasudare-ami Hanakago Basket by Yamamoto Chikuryusai I of round bamboo strands enclosed in the original signed wooden box lacquered in translucent red. The basket exudes a deep respect for the tradition, every knot perfect, the proportions exquisite. It is 19 cm (7-1/2 inches) diameter, 37 cm (14-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Yamamoto Chikuryusai I (1868-1945) was a bamboo artist of the early modern era in Osaka. Born in year one of the Meiji era to the Yanagi clan, his former Samurai family hailed from Yodo, a castle town between Osaka and Kyoto. He later was adopted by his Sister in Law to the Yamamoto family, changing his name to Yamamoto at the time, however it was with his older brother, Yanagi Takesada that he learned basketry in their shop in Osaka. Takesada moved to Korea; for the Japanese at the time it was the New West, but Chikuryusai remained in Japan. Unlike others, Chikuryusai did not attempt to insert himself into his baskets, but, allowed his baskets a traditional elegance. He was renowned for his calligraphy, sencha aesthetic, and his elegant and reserved artistic vision. His baskets received awards at several important international expositions, and, with his two sons, Chikuryusai II and Chikken, participated in the annual Teiten/Bunten National Art Exhibitions. He served as mentor to not only his two sons but also Hamano Chikkosai, Ikeda Seiryusai, and Suemura Shobun. In 1929, he gave the artist “Go” (name) to his son but continued working under the name Shoen until his death in 1945. Work by him is held in the Asian Art Museum San Francisco, The Minneapolis Institute of Art and The Met New York among many other public and private collections.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Inro and Sagemono : Pre 1900 item #1430766 (stock #MOR7965)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A sage in robes decorated with peonies and dragons with his signature voluminous hat accompanied by a boy carrying a bundle of books is out for a stroll on the intricately carved surface of this antique bamboo incense container with wooden bung and black lacquered plug dating from 19th century Japan. There is a small silver ring now filled with a wooden plug where once a chord would have been attached for carrying on a belt or sash. It is 31.5 cm (12-1/2 inches) long, 3 cm (over 1 inch) diameter on average, slightly tapering as would be expected of bamboo; and is in fine condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1960 item #1434291 (stock #MOR8004)
The Kura
$700.00
A pair of small bronze rabbits on black lacquered round wood stand enclosed in the original signed wooden box. They are roughly 13 cm (5 inches) long and in fine condition, dating from the first half of the 20th century.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1700 item #1415417 (stock #MOR7055)
The Kura
sold, with thanks!
A set of early wood panels, once doors on a votive shrine, painted with guardian shishi lions (Also called Fu-dogs) in polychrome colors, much worn with time. The doors are of clear grained hinoki (Japanese cypress) and have shrunk horizontally over the centuries, evidenced by the ari (wooden support) which is inset into them. On back one can see clearly the silhouette of the original metal-work. Momoyama to early Edo period, they are 37.5 x 47 cm (15 x 18-1/2 inches) each and would be fabulous framed as a set or individually.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Devotional Objects : Pre 1900 item #1436156 (stock #MOR8021)
The Kura
$3,800.00
Sale Pending
A serene image in black of Kannon, the goddess of mercy, seated on a lotus before a gilded mandorla dating from the later Edo to early Meiji period, 19th century. The image itself is 24 cm (9-1/2 inches). The entire composition (with stand and Mandorla) is 58.5 cm (23 inches) tall, 30 x 27.5 cm (12 x 11 inches) across the base. Both the figure and the stand are made using the yosegi technique of joined blocks of wood. Across the joint of the lap is a crack, and the left arm has been reattached. There is typical loss of lacquer and polychrome consistent with age.
Kannon is a Bodhisattva, (one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind in this world. Kannon, known as Avalokitasvara in Sanskrit or Guan-yin in Chinese, is a Bodhisattva; is one who has prolonged their own eternal enlightenment to stay behind to alleviate the suffering of others in this ephemeral world. Originally a male deity, the iconography is generally shown as feminine or androgynous in Japan and is one of the most popular deities in the Japanese Buddhist Pantheon. Kannon is the central figure in the Heart Sutra (Hanyashingyo) and an important figure in the Lotus Sutra wherein is written a list of the 33 forms that Kannon may take to aid those in need. This list is the origin of the pilgrimage of the 33 temples of Kannon in Kansai and later in Kanto. It is said that Kannon expended so much effort in listening to the cries of the unfortunate that his head split into pieces, so Amiddha then gave the deity 11 heads to hear the cries of sentient beings. Thus one can often see images of Kannon with a crown of heads.