The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1930 item #1494327 (stock #K400)
The Kura
$5,800.00
A stylish basket of woven bamboo laced with old arrows by Tanabe Chikuunsai II made for the preeminent Shiobido Gallery in Osaka enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 16 cm diameter, 37 cm tall and in perfect condition.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
The Shobido Jewelry Co. was founded in 1900 at Yodoyabashi, in central Osaka City by Eikichiro Eto. They are purveyors of watches, Jewelry, art and crafts, silverware and precious metals from the Meiji era to the present day, and their products and artisans were considered elite among Japanese crafts. In fact many of Japans greatest craftsman created unique works for the Shobido label.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1492677 (stock #K064)
The Kura
$950.00
A pair of masks representing the two variations of Tengu, the long nosed Tengu and the Karasu (Crow) Tengu mounted on a wooden placard dating from the Meiji period. Each mask is of carved and lacquered wood with inset glass eyes. The placard is 38cm (15 inches) wide 22.5 cm (9 inches) tall and the masks are roughly 11 cm (4 inches plus) in depth. It looks as if the Karasu Tengu mask has had the eyes repaired, and they appear cloudy by comparison to those of the the long nosed partner.
The long-nosed and or Beaked Tengu is a mythical creature from Japanese folklore. Tengu are believed to be supernatural beings often depicted with human and bird-like features. They're known for their long noses, which can vary in length depending on the depiction. Tengu are often associated with mountain forests and are considered protectors of the mountains. They are known for their mischievous nature, martial arts prowess, and sometimes for teaching humans valuable lessons or skills. In Japanese culture, Tengu are a fascinating blend of reverence and fear, embodying both the spiritual and the natural worlds.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1492517 (stock #Z095)
The Kura
$1,600.00
A deliciously horrifying painting of a ghost rising from the empty field dating from the 19th century completely remounted and ready to go for another century of leering from the shadows. Ink on paper with highlights of gofun and red pigment separated from a field of blue by a single narrow strand of red and gold Kinran silk terminating in dark wood rollers. The artist has sealed the panting with two crimson chops in the lower corner. The scroll is 42.7 x 196 cm (16-3/4 x 77 inches) and is in overall excellent condition, completely remounted.
For the Japanese Kaidan-banashi, or ghost stories, are a summer tradition. It is said that the telling of a ghost tale at night will cause the temperature in the room to fall, a great necessity during those boiling summer evenings. The ghosts and their associated skeletons have also long been subject in Buddhist art, with the emphasis on the brief nature of our lives in comparison to the cosmic void.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1483162
The Kura
sold, thank you
The title does not lie, this is one against which all others might be measured. A celebratory sake set consisting of three cups and a stand enclosed in their original lacquered wooden boxes. The cups are over the top, decorated with plum pine and bamboo in taka-maki-e gold over red replete with bits of kirigane gold and ke-uchi details. The cups are equally gorgeous on top and bottom, the design extending even inside the foot ring. Roundels of the same designs are built up in gold and lacquer maki-e on the black lacquered stand, the inside of which is covered in Togidashi Nashiji. Along the edge of the stand are carefully placed bits of gold in a technique known as oki-hirame. The stand is 17 x 17 x 14.2 cm (6-3/4 x 6-3/4 x 5-1/2 inches). The cups are 9.8 cm (4 inches) 11.2 cm (4-1/2 inches) and 12.7 cm (5 inches) diameter respectively, and all are in excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1930 item #1491726 (stock #N11)
The Kura
$1,350.00
A peaceful cluster of homes blanketed in snow by Shirakura Niho enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kamo Sekkei (Kamo in Snow). This is likely an image from very close to the artists heart, he lived west of the Kamo River in Kyoto, and one can imagine this being one of the bridges spanning that river he has seen out on a winter day. Ink,Gofun & Light color on Silk bordered in light colored cloth. The scroll is 46.5 x 203.5 cm (18-1/4 x 80 inches) and is in overall excellent condition. Niho was from Niigata prefecture, where harsh winters are the norm, and he was well known for his winter imagery.
Shirakura Kinichiro (Kinro, Niho or Jiho, Kanyu, 1896-1974) was born the first son of lawyer and scholar Shirakura Shigeichi in Shibata city, Niigata. His father was a noted Kangakusha, the pre-modern Japanese study of China; the counterpart of Kokugaku (Japanese Studies) and Yōgaku or Rangaku (Western or “Dutch” Studies). He was initially inducted into the Nanga school of painting at the age of 12 under Hattori Goro. He moved to Tokyo at the age of 17, where he studied Western Oil painting with Oshita Tojiro and watercolor under Ishii Hakutei. Two years later his paintings were first accepted into the 8th Bunten National Exhibition under the name Kinro. That same year his work was honored in the Tokyo Taisho Hakurankai Exposition. In 1915 his paintings were again accepted into the Bunten where they were awarded Nyusen status. Despite his initial successes, he paled on Western painting and in 1917 decided to return to the Nanga school joining his initial teacher Hattori Goro who had relocated to Kyoto and it was from Goro that he received the name Niho which we know he was using by mid 1920 when Hattori fell ill, and Niho moved by introduction to study under Tajika Chikuson. In 1921, along with Komura Suiun, Ikeda Keisen, Yano Kyoson, Mizuta Chikuho, Mitsui Hanzan, and Kono Shuson he became a founding member of the Nihon Nanga-In society of literati artists. That same year his first collection of paintings was published, and he began a two year journey in China, which had become a Mecca for Japanese artists. He would consistently display at the Bunten/Teiten where he was consistently awarded, as well as the Nihon Nanga-In. In 1926 he would move to the tutelage of Komura Suiun in Tokyo, and be awarded at the Fist Shotoku Taishi Art Exhibition. He began exhibiting at the newly formed Nanga Renmei Exhibition in 1937 and in 1938 he established his own art salon. In 1940 he would change his name from Niho to Kanyu. Post war his participation in art expositions becomes sporadic. His final known painting, of Nijo castle, created in 1972 is held in the Kyoto prefectural Archives. Other work by him is held in the collections of the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo, the Kyoto Municipal Kyocera Museum, the Nîgata Prefectural Museum of Art, the Tenmon Museum in Osaka, the Korean National Museum in Seoul, the Smithsonian in Washington DC, the Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the Honolulu Museum of Art and the Kaluz Museum in Mexico City among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1900 item #1487484
The Kura
SOLD
A carved wood figure of a wandering priest, robes billowing in the wind, his large straw hat full of holes, signed Yasuchika on the back. Dating from the late Edo to Meiji period, it is by a member of the Tsuchiya Yasuchika lineage. The figure is 31 cm (12 inches) tall and in excellent condition, complete with walking stick.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Dolls : Pre 1980 item #1492678 (stock #K087)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Two dramatic Bunraku Puppet Kashira (heads) from the Awaji puppet carving tradition. The male is Kumagai Naozane, a character from the Heikei Monogatari present at the Battle of Ichinotani made by Ryuun. The female figure is Yaegakehime from the play Honcho Nijushi ko. They are both roughly 20 cm (8 inches) tall from the neck, 40 cm (16 inches) tall as they are seen on their stands respectively and are in excellent condition. They are fully functional, both nod up and down, and can open and or close their eyes by toggles on the neck, and his eyebrows move up and down.
Kumagai Naozane was a famous soldier who served the Genji (Minamoto) clan during the Heian period of Japanese history. Kumagai is particularly known for his exploits during the Genpei War, specifically for killing the young warrior Taira no Atsumori at the battle of Ichi-no-tani in 1184.
The princess is the heroine of a five-act drama named the 24 models of filial piety (Honcho Nijushi Ko). This historical drama was first performed in 1766.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1469368 (stock #L006)
The Kura
sold, thank you
An exceedingly rare (in fact the only one I have ever seen) Tenmoku-Dai stand for a Tenmoku Chawan by Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Kuruwa Tenmoku Dai (Curved Circular Tea Bowl Stand). It is made of layer upon layer of lacquer, carved with scrolling designs revealing the depth of the lacquer in a style known as Guri. The artist has carved his seal into the inside of the base. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter7.5 cm (3 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1900 item #1492992 (stock #K086)
The Kura
$2,500.00
A lacquered writing box in the shape of a kimono sleeve (sode) covered in soaring silver and gold geese among autumn reeds and Togidashi clouds with a secondary (inner) sleeve shape covered in Karakusa vine tendrils on black enclosed in an age darkened kiri wood box. The inside is covered entirely in nashiji gold powder, and contains a grinding stone, and a water dropper of copper inset into the tray. Also enclosed are a bamboo brush and gilded ink stick decorated with a squirrel on a grapevine made by Koundo. The box is 22 x 15 x 3.5cm (8-1/2 x 6 x 1-1/2 inches) and is in overall excellent condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1488700 (stock #OC017)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A handle surmounts the peak of this beautifully rendered vase by Myagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Seiji-yu Sometsuke Te-oke-gata Kabin (Celadon Handled Bucket Shaped Vase with Blue and White Design). It is 16 cm (6 inches) diameter, 32.5 cm (13 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth-generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan (1859-1940) through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one-year mourning for his father’s passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The unlucky third generation inherited the kiln at the height of the war years, it was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1960 item #1492756 (stock #K062)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Grain rises majestically on the surface of this pale vase by pioneering female potter Suwa Sozan II enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Mugi-mon Hanaire. It is 15 cm (6 inches) diameter 34 cm (13-1/2 inches) tall and in excellent condition.
Suwa Sozan (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others. Sozan II (Torako) was born in Kanazawa in 1890, and was soon adopted by her uncle, Suwa Sozan I. Her ceramics resemble those of Sozan I, but are considered to be more graceful and feminine. Torako assumed the family name upon her uncles death in 1922. She is held in the collection of the Imperial Household Agency among others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1482621
The Kura
sold, thank you
A hawk rests on an elaborate perch, the feathers fluffed up, each uniquely carved on this rare okimono from the Mushiake kilns of Okayama prefecture. It comes in an ancient kiri-wood box. The notation on the side of the box states it was received in late Meiji 27 (1894) from the former Head of the Okayama fief Ikeda Mochimasa. The name of the recipient has been redacted, as is often the case when things change hands in Japan. It is 24 x 7.4 x 29 cm (9 x 3 x 11-1/2 inches). A ringlet on one side and a hook under the bar, both made of wire-thin clay, have been broken off, otherwise it is in excellent condition. A work like this from Mushiake is unprecedented, a true rarity.
Mushiake ware is pottery made in modern day Setouchi City, Okayama Prefecture. Legend states it was begun as the Niwa-yaki (a private samurai residence kiln) by the Igi Family, chief retainer of the Okayama Domain. The kiln origin is unknown, but possible originated with the 6th head of the Igi family, and was certainly active in the Bunka/Bunsei eras at the opening of the 19th century. It is said the third generation Dohachi fired work there. The kiln was shut down in 1842, but five years later revitalized by the 14th-generation head of the Igi family, Igi Tadazumi (Sanensai, 1818–1886,), who was a well-known tea master. He invited Seifu Yohei (1803–1861) who came to the kiln and taught blue and white pottery techniques, Korean and other traditions popular in the capitol at the time. At the end of the Edo period (Bunkyu era) Mori Kakutaro took over operations at the kiln. In the early Meiji era Miyagawa Kozan came to work at the kiln, and it is said Kakutaro’s son Hikoichiro took the character Ko from Kozan for his own pseudonym Mori Koshu. Once again, during the Meiji era, the kiln shut down temporarily, and Hikoichiro (now known as Koshu) went to Yokohama to learn new pottery techniques from Kozan. The kiln enjoyed some success during this era, but was again shut down eventually, and revived in 1932. It is still in existence today.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1469371 (stock #L009)
The Kura
sold, thank you
Suwa Sozan I enclosed in the original wooden box titled Kagyu-tsuki Take Kake-hana-ire (Bamboo Hanging Vase with Snail) bearing the Teishitsu Gigei-in Seal of the Imperial Art Academy signed inside “Sozan, with Amateur Skill” followed by the artists seal in red. It is 49 cm long and in excellent condition. The only other I have ever seen in this style is published in the rare 1971 book Suwa Sozan Sakuhin Shu page 59.
Sozan I (1852-1922) was born in Kutani country, present day Ishikawa prefecture, where he initially studied before moving to Tokyo in 1875. Over the next 25 years he would gravitate between Tokyo and Kanazawa, working at various kilns and research facilities. He again relocated, this time to Kyoto in 1900 to manage the Kinkozan Studio before establishing his own. His name became synonymous with celadon and refined porcelain and was one of only five potters to be named Teishitsu Gigei-in. The Teishitsu Gigei-in were members of the Imperial Art Academy, Perhaps in modern terms one might call them the predecessors to the Living National Treasures. However unlike the LNT, there were only five Pottery artists ever named Teishitsu Gigei-in, Ito Tozan, Suwa Sozan, Itaya Hazan, Miyagawa Kozan, and Seifu Yohei III. He was succeeded by his adopted daughter upon his death. He is held in the Kyoto National Museum among many others.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1980 item #1484141
The Kura
sold, thank you
Coxcomb decorates the deeply carved surface of this box covered in green and red lacquer outside, gilded with gold inside in the Kamakura-bori carving tradition. It is 22 x 25 x 5 cm and comes enclosed in a period wooden box. Kamakura-bori is a type of lacquer ware made in the area around the ancient capital city of Kamakura in Kanagawa prefecture. The tradition is based on carved lacquer wares imported from China during the Kamakura era. However, many Japanese lacquer craftsmen did not adopt the Chinese method of layering lacquer and then carving it; instead, they created Kamakura-bori, a method of carving wood and then coating the already prepared surface with lacquer. Initially, sculptors of Buddhist ritual implements and temple carpenters that were influenced by Chinese art works started to carve items made of Japanese Judas tree or ginkgo and applied a lacquer finish to the pieces in order to mass-produce Buddhist altar fittings resembling carved Chinese lacquer without the extensive drying time. This style came to be known as Kamakura-bori, or literally Kamakura Carving, and the adoption of traditional Japanese patterns made the technique unique to the island nation. Kamakura-bori features chisel markings left intentionally to accentuate patterned areas. Another unique technique is to sprinkle black ink on a vermilion lacquered surface, then polish down the highlights in order for the patterns to stand out from the darkened background. The carving and lacquering techniques of Kamakura-bori have evolved for the past 800 years. Today, production has spread to include everyday goods as well.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1920 item #1494404 (stock #K105OC084)
The Kura
$2,600.00
A white vase adorned with an even whiter phoenix in slight relief by Teishitsu Gigei-in Ito Tozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hakuji Ho-o Mon Kabin. It is 22 cm (just less than 9 inches) tall, 10 cm (4 inches) diameter and in excellent condition. It comes wrapped in a cloth pouch with the original rosewood stand. Serving as buffer at the bottom of the box was a number of sheets of paper written in both English and French as well as Japanese, and we have kept them for posterity.
Ito Tozan I (1846-1920) began as a painter in the Maruyama school studying under Koizumi Togaku. In 1862 he became a pupil of Kameya Kyokutei, as well as studying under Takahashi Dohachi III nd Kanzan Denshichi (who made the dishes for the imperial table). In 1867, with the fall of the Edo government, he opened his kiln in Eastern Kyoto. Much prizd at home, he was also recognized abroad at the Amsterdam, Paris and Chicago World Expositions. With an emphasis on Awata and Asahi wares of Kyoto, he began to use the name Tozan around 1895. In 1917 he was named a member of the Imperial Art Academy, one of only five potters ever given that title.
Ito Tozan II (1871-1937) was born the fourth son of one of the upper level samurai of the Zeze feudal domain in Otsu, just over the mountains from Kyoto and began his artistic career as a painter. He was picked up by Tozan I and introduced to the plastic arts, where he flourished, taking over the Tozan kiln in 1920, following the death of his mentor.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1980 item #1485955
The Kura
sold, thank you
An unusual woven basket of bamboo strips and roots in the shape of a cocoon or bird nest dating from the 20th century. It can be used flat on a table or even better suspended on the wall or pillar. It is 43 cm (17 inches) long and in excellent original condition.
All Items : Vintage Arts : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Baskets : Pre 1940 item #1492918 (stock #K090)
The Kura
$4,900.00
Sale Pending
A beautifully crafted basket by Tanabe Chikuunsai enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Hirokuchi Senshu-ami Hanakago (Wide Mouthed Senshu-weave Basket). It is 18 cm (7 inches) diameter, 35 cm (14 inches) tall and retains the original bamboo insert. A similar basket is held in the collection of the Minneapolis Institute of Art.
Tanabe Chikuunsai II (1910-2000) was born in Osaka the son of Tanabe Chikuunsai I and trained under his father. In 1930 he became a member of the Naniwa Ranyukai and exhibited was first accepted into the Teiten (Modern Nitten) National Art Exhibition in 1931, and exhibited there both prior to and following the second world war. He assumed the name of Chikuunsai II on the death of his father in 1937. In 1991 he transferred his studio name to his eldest son, who became Chikuunsai III and took the retirement name Ichikusai. Work by him is held in museums throughout the world including the Metropolitan Museum in New York, Museum of Fine Art in Boston, San Francisco Asian Art Museum and aforementioned Minneapolis among many others.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1477286
The Kura
sold, thank you
This is a breathtaking work of art, a cherubic figure forms the finial of this later Edo period ceramic incense burner. Atop the lid strides a youth in purple robes wearing a lotus leaf as a hat and blowing a flue, a staff lays at his feet. About the square box of the ash pot are exquisite-colored designs lined with gold like precious jewels dangling from the edge. Two beast heads protrude from the sides and the entire is elevated on a square foot. The koro is 8 x 11 x 17 cm (3-1/4 x 4-1/2 x 7 inches) and is in excellent condition. It comes enclosed in an age darkened Kiri-wood box with chamfered edges titled Ninsei Fue-buki Jizo Koro annotated inside the lid Zuiichi (Superlative) followed by a Kao signature traditionally used by Tea Masters, Literati and important figures such as samurai and (Edo period) court figures.