The Kura - Japanese Art Treasures
Robert Mangold has been working with Japanese antiques since 1995 with an emphasis on ceramics, Paintings, Armour and Buddhist furniture.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1494198 (stock #K402)
The Kura
$2,250.00
A Momoyama to early Edo period (16th-17th century) small Chawan , much worn inside, with old gold repairs gleaming softly on the iron ringed rim. Aside from this iron circle, and the wear earned over centuries on the slightly oblong shape, there is no decoration. It is 12.6 × 10.9 × 6.2 cm (5 x 4-1/4 x 2-1/2 inches) and comes wrapped in a crepe silk pouch enclosed in an old, fine quality kiri-wood box.
Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1494168 (stock #K403)
The Kura
$850.00
Sale Pending
A standing lion covered in running yellow bamboo ash glaze from the Edo period kilns of Takatori on the southern Isle of Kyushu. Head held high, the smoke would vent straight out of the creatures mouth, as if exhaling the fragrant tendrils. It is 14 x 10.5 x 20 cm and is in excellent condition, enclosed in a modern kiri-wood storage box.
Takatori-yaki, is a traditional style of Japanese pottery that originated in the early 17th century. It was developed in the town of Takatori (mod. Fukuoka Prefecture). Takatori-yaki is renowned for its unique and distinctive aesthetic, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy tones and running glaze. The history of Takatori pottery dates back to the beginning of the Edo period (1603-1868) when a Korean potter named Yi Sam-pyeong, also known as Ri Sampei in Japanese, settled in the area. Yi Sam-pyeong had been brought to Japan by the powerful daimyo (feudal lord) Hosokawa Tadaoki, who ruled over the Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture). Tadaoki was fascinated by Korean pottery and invited skilled potters from Korea to establish kilns in Japan, with Yi Sam-pyeong being one of them. Under the patronage of the Hosokawa family, Yi Sam-pyeong and his descendants established the Takatori kilns in the town of Takatori. Initially, the kilns produced pottery influenced by Korean styles, particularly the Buncheong and Ido wares. However, over time, they developed their own distinct style, blending Korean techniques with Japanese aesthetics. Takatori was highly prized by tea masters and samurai lords who appreciated its rustic charm and humble beauty. Takatori-yaki became an integral part of the tea ceremony culture, as its earthy tones and natural glazes were considered suitable for the serene and rustic atmosphere of tea houses.
Shishi guardians, also known as Komainu or "lion dogs," have a long history in Japanese art and culture; iconic figures often depicted in pairs and placed at the entrances of shrines, temples, and other important structures to ward off evil spirits and protect against negative energies. The origins of the Shishi can be found in ancient Chinese culture, specifically the mythical creature known as the "shi" or "foo dog" in English. These creatures were believed to have protective qualities and were commonly depicted in Chinese art and architecture. As Buddhism spread to Japan from China in the 6th century, so too did the imagery of the lion guardians. The artistic representation of Shishi lion guardians in Japan evolved into a unique style. The sculptures typically depict a pair of lion-like creatures with fierce expressions, large manes, and muscular bodies. One lion has an open mouth to represent the sound "ah," which is believed to expel negative energy, while the other has a closed mouth to represent the sound "um," which is believed to retain positive energy. This duality symbolizes the balance between yin and yang, and the harmony between opposing forces.
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1494029 (stock #K398)
The Kura
$950.00
By Naimen Shiho II enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter, 27cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition. This is a great pair with the vase in the same form with silver inlay by his father.
Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji, (1904-1987) studied metalwork under Ichioka Shiun from the age of 15 establishing his own workshop in 1925. His work was first publicly exhibited at the 1930 National Shokoten. Two years later he would be awarded at the Belgium World Exposition. He remained active throughout the troubled years of the mid-century for which he would receive the order of cultural merit from Takaoka City in 1967. Work by him is held in the Takaoka City Museum. He remained an active promoter of traditional bronze ware until his death in 1987. His son, the second generation Shiho would study under his father from 1957. He too is much lauded beginning with top prize at the 1974 Takaoka Traditional Craft Exhibition
All Items : Artists : Metalwork : Pre 2000 item #1494028 (stock #K399)
The Kura
$1,200.00
A pumpkin lobed vase with silver inlay by Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji) enclosed in the original signed wooden box. It is 19.5 cm (8 inches) diameter, 27 cm (11 inches) tall and in excellent condition. This is a great pair with the vase in the same form in simple Murashidao mottled olive tones by his son.
Naimen Shiho I (Katsuji, (1904-1987) studied metalwork under Ichioka Shiun from the age of 15 establishing his own workshop in 1925. His work was first publicly exhibited at the 1930 National Shokoten. Two years later he would be awarded at the Belgium World Exposition. He remained active throughout the troubled years of the mid-century for which he would receive the order of cultural merit from Takaoka City in 1967. Work by him is held in the Takaoka City Museum. He remained an active promoter of traditional bronze ware until his death in 1987. His son, the second generation Shiho would study under his father from 1957. He too is much lauded beginning with top prize at the 1974 Takaoka Traditional Craft Exhibition
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Paintings : Pre 1900 item #1493844 (stock #K112)
The Kura
$680.00
A hand painted cloth banner decorated with imagery by various artists including the Nanga School literati artists Tanomura Chokunyu (1814-1907) and Nakanishi Koseki (1807-1884) as well as Tanaka Koha of the Kagetsuan School of Sencha and Confucian scholar Goto Shoin (1797-1864) and Hirose Kyokuso (1807-1863) who were two of the most important followers of Rai Sanyo. The date Konoe-saru (year of the monkey in metal) is visible in both the central leaf and the lower left gourd image. Judging then by the 60 year cyclical zodiac calendar it dates from the fifth month of 1860. The title, signed Shochiku-Rojin (the old man Shochiku), reads Betsu-yu-ten-chi-hi-jin-kan, a poetic phrase meaning there are other worlds aside from that of the human plane, specifically alluding to a world without human desire. Perhaps when these learned gentlemen gathered for tea beyond this curtain, they felt that they had experienced one of these other worlds. The cloth is 91 x 160 cm (36 x 63 inches) including a pouch through which a bamboo stave would have been run for hanging. Toned somewhat with age, the fibers are strong
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1800 item #1493747 (stock #K075)
The Kura
$1,400.00
A fabulous Edo period large Gohon Chawan from the Hagi region, a classical bowl wearing its history in a spider thread of gleaming gold. Broken once, the cracks have been repaired with softly gleaming thin wisps o gold in the highest quality. The bowl is 12.5 × 15 x 8 cm (5 x 6 x 3 inches) and comes enclosed in a period Kiri-wood box. Kintsugi lacquer gold repairs embody the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1493743 (stock #K100)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A masterpiece white porcelain vase by Miura Chikusen III retaining the original richly carved rosewood stand enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled White Porcelain Vase Carved with Flowers, Vines and Sun Designs which is in turn enclosed in a protective outer box, a testament to the import placed on the piece. It is 41 cm (16 inches) tall plus the stand, and in excellent condition. The vase dates between 1921 and 1931.
Miura Chikusen I (1854-1915) made a name for himself as a strict adherent to and supplier of Sencha tea wares in Kyoto; one of the most important artists in the country for that genre. He studied under Takahashi Dohachi from the age of 13, before establishing his own studio in 1883. He was a feature in the literati community of Kyoto and was well known also as a painter, poet and calligraphist. His porcelains were considered of the highest grade throughout the Meiji era, and are still highly collectable today. The Eldest son took over after his father assuming the family name as Chikusen II, but died young in 1920 leaving a young child, whereupon his younger brother took over as Chikusen, III. However when Chikusen IIs eldest son was old enough, III relinquished the helm, appointing his nephew Chikusen IV and assuming the name Chikuken (Chikken). The kiln continues, currently under the management of the fifth generation.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Pre 1930 item #1493697 (stock #K092)
The Kura
$2,750.00
A fine pair of White Porcelain vases with raised designs by Miura Chikken (Chikuken) dating from the early 20th century each enclosed in the original signed wooden box. The are roughly 17.5 cm (7 inches) diameter, 28.5 cm (over 11 inches) tall and in excellent condition. Although the same diameter, one is slightly shorter than the other. Miura Chikken (Chikuken, 1900-1990) was born the third son of Miura Chikusen I. He was named the third head of the Chikusen family after the untimely death of his older brother in 1918, but returned the kiln to his brother’s son after his coming of age in 1934. That year he set out on his own path with the new name Chikken focusing on traditional Kenzan-Ninsei styles.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1493651 (stock #K059)
The Kura
$500.00
Something wild remains in the expression of this quiet little creature hiding away from human eyes. It is Bizen pottery, dating from the 19th to early 20th century, when Saikumono sculptural works were at their peak of production. It is 10.5 x 17.5 x 10.5 cm (4 x 7-1/2 x 4 inches) and is in excellent condition.
The Bizen pottery tradition in Japan dates back over a thousand years, tracing its roots to the Heian period (794-1185). Located in the Okayama Prefecture, the Bizen region has been renowned for its unique style of pottery, characterized by rustic simplicity, earthy textures, and natural aesthetics. The beauty of Bizen pottery lies in its adherence to wood-fired kilns. The firing process is crucial, as it allows for the spontaneous creation of unpredictable patterns and colors on the pottery's surface. These effects result from the interaction of flames, ash, and minerals present in the clay during the high-temperature firing, reaching up to 1300 degrees Celsius. Bizen ware typically features unglazed surfaces, showcasing the natural qualities of the clay itself. The pottery's reddish-brown coloration, derived from the iron-rich clay native to the Bizen region, is emblematic of its organic appeal. Saiku-mono or figurative pottery works were very popular in the 19th and early 20th centuries, and that tradition still exists today. Simplicity of form, often inspired by nature and everyday objects, enhances the pottery's charm. Its rustic elegance and understated sophistication resonate with collectors and enthusiasts worldwide.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1493650 (stock #K093)
The Kura
sold, thank you
A set of five sake cups, each engraved with a unique poem by the artist/nun Otagaki Rengetsu dating from her 83rd year enclosed in an antique Sarasa cloth pouch with silk pads between enclosed in an old wooden box. They are each 5 cm (2 inches) diameter and all are in excellent condition. The poems read:
1 Wakabae no yanagi no ito no mijikaku te furiwakegami no kokochi koso sure
The newborn willow fronds are short and feel to me just like bobbed hair
2 Umazake no miwa no sugi zu ba kore zo kono oi zu shina zu no kusuri nara mashi
Fine sake in balance becomes an elixir for perpetual youth and long life
3 Asakaze ni ubara kaori te hototogisu naku ya uzuki no shiga no yamasato
On the morning breeze the scent of rambler roses...a cuckoo cries crossing Uzuki over Shiga Mountain Villages
4 Kawazoi no yanagi no ito ni kakari keri nokoru koori no kataware no tsuki
In the willow fronds along the riverbank caught like lingering ice—a half moon
5 Tanazoko wo uke te matsu ma mo chiyo ya hen nome ba wakayu to kiku no shitatsuyu
In my palms waiting for eons to pass...I hear drinking this will make me younger—the chrysanthemums' hanging dew
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1900 item #1493633 (stock #K149)
The Kura
$550.00
A cluster of Blue and White Edo period Imari bowls which melted together in the inferno and fused, three becoming one in a fortuitous accident. The Japanese have long held these flaws in high esteem, accentuating the ideas of Wabi-sabi and the ephemeral which permeate Japanese culture. Roughly 24 x 16 x 8 cm (9-1/2 x 6 x 3 inches), a very interesting addition to the table.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1700 item #1493628 (stock #K077)
The Kura
$2,200.00
Golden Maple leaves and five petaled plum blossoms float on the golden pond pooling on this early Edo period Karatsu Chawan decorated with a single Zen circle. Superb quality repairs gleam about the rim, one large repair decorated over top of the gold with fine amages of leaves and blossoms. The base is small and shallow, indicative of the early era. It is 12 cm (just less than 5 inches) diameter, 7.5cm (3 inches) tall and comes enclosed in an old wooden box.
Kintsugi embodies the spirit of wabi-sabi, a Japanese aesthetic worldview centered around imperfection, transience, and the beauty of the natural cycle of growth and decay. Embracing the flawed and broken aspects of an object through kintsugi is a way to appreciate the passage of time and the history of the object, recognizing that it gains value and character through its journey. Kintsugi aligns with traditional Japanese values of frugality and resourcefulness. Instead of discarding broken items, kintsugi repairs them, extending their lifespan and reducing waste. This approach reflects a profound respect for resources and a desire to cherish and honor the objects used in daily life. This is also a way to avoid offending the spirit of the object, as all items are embodied with a soul of some sort. The act of repairing broken pottery with gold-laced lacquer carries a symbolic message of resilience and overcoming adversity. The restored object becomes a metaphor for the human experience, highlighting that even after suffering damage or hardship, one can find beauty and strength through healing and renewal. In the context of the Japanese tea ceremony kintsugi plays a vital role in enhancing the overall aesthetic experience, especially during the tenth month. The practice of kintsugi encourages contemplation and introspection during the tea ceremony. Guests may be reminded of the impermanence of all things and the beauty that can arise from embracing life's scars and vulnerabilities. Overall, kintsugi holds a deep cultural and philosophical significance in Japanese culture, symbolizing beauty in imperfection, respect for resources, and the resilience of both objects and individuals. In the context of the tea ceremony, it enriches the aesthetics and fosters a sense of mindfulness and appreciation for the present moment.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Lacquer : Pre 1920 item #1493627 (stock #K126)
The Kura
$2,950.00
A set of 4 exquisite lacquered wooden boxes with trays decorated with Tsuba (sword guards) in gold on a jet black mirror surface dating from the early 20th century enclosed in a four tier black lacquered wooden box. Inside is silver Nashiji with scattered cherry blossoms. The trays feature solid silver rims and are signed Ryoshin. Each box is 13.5 x 10.5 x 5.7 cm (5-1/4 x 4 x 2 inches) and each tray is 17.6 x 14.6 x 1.7 cm and all are in overall fine condition.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1900 item #1493626 (stock #K019)
The Kura
Sale Pending
An inviting poem for the 8th month is engraved among the leaves and grapes clinging to the vines forming the handle on this tall ewer covered in pale white glaze by Otagaki Rengetsu dating from the 19th century. It is 22 cm (9 inches) tall, 13.5 x 19 cm across the handle and is in excellent condition. The poem reads:
Okazaki no tsuki mi ni ki mase
Miyakobito
kado no hata imo nite matsura nan
Come see the moon in Okazaki
People of Kyoto
And I will serve you boiled garden potatoes
Otagaki Rengetsu (1791-1875) was born into a samurai family, she was adopted into the Otagaki family soon after birth, and served as a lady in waiting in Kameoka Castle in her formative years, where she received an education worthy of a Lady of means. Reputed to be incredibly beautiful, she was married and bore three children; however, her husband and all children died before she was twenty. Remarried she bore another daughter, however that child too perished and her husband died while she was just 32. Inconsolable, she cut off her hair to join the nunnery at Chion-in Temple, where she renounced the world and received the name Rengetsu (Lotus Moon). However, this was not the end, but only the beginning of a career as artist and poet which would propel her to the top of the 19th century Japan literati art world.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Sculpture : Pre 1920 item #1493597 (stock #K145)
The Kura
$800.00
Sale Pending
A hardwood carving of a gnarled pine bristling with needles over clouds in what appears to be some type of dark rosewood. Beautifully crafted, it is 19 x 15 x 5.5 cm (7-1/2 x 6 x 2 inches) and is in excellent condition, dating from the later 19th to early 20th centuries at the height of the Sencha tea movement.
Sencha, as we know it today, started to gain popularity during the 18th century with the rise in Literati thought in Japan. This is partly due to the influx of Chinese at the fall of the Ming dynasty in the mid 17th century and how their culture was absorbed into the greater Japanese culture over the subsequent generations. Sencha is a non-powdered green tea, which distinguishes it from the powdered matcha commonly used in formal tea ceremonies. Along with the tea itself, came an appreciation of the accoutrements and aesthetic which were quite different from those used in powdered tea. Chinese literati culture emphasized simplicity, natural beauty, and a deep connection to the natural world. These values resonated with Japanese tea practitioners who incorporated them into their own tea culture. They overlapped with concepts like "wabi-sabi," which celebrates imperfection and transience, and "yūgen," which suggests a subtle, profound beauty. It manifested itself in many aspects of Japanese culture, including architecture, garden design, painitng and all related crafts. Overall, the influence of Chinese steeped tea practices and literati culture on Japanese tea culture has been a rich and multifaceted process. It has contributed to the unique blend of aesthetics, philosophy, and rituals that define Japanese tea culture, creating a distinct tradition that reflects both local innovations and cross-cultural interactions
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Porcelain : Pre 1930 item #1493594 (stock #K103)
The Kura
$2,950.00
Sale Pending
Peaches decorate this exquisite vessel in Kutani colors by Tei Shitsu Gigei-in Ito Tozan. It is 17 cm (6-1/2 inches) diameter, 31 cm (12-1/4 inches) tall and in excellent condition. It comes in an unmarked old kiri-wood box.
Ito Tozan I (1846-1920) began as a painter in the Maruyama school studying under Koizumi Togaku. In 1862 he became a pupil of Kameya Kyokutei, as well as studying under Takahashi Dohachi III nd Kanzan Denshichi (who made the dishes for the imperial table). In 1867, with the fall of the Edo government, he opened his kiln in Eastern Kyoto. Much prized at home, he was also recognized abroad at the Amsterdam, Paris and Chicago World Expositions. With an emphasis on Awata and Asahi wares of Kyoto, he began to use the name Tozan around 1895. In 1917 he was named a member of the Imperial Art Academy, one of only five potters ever given that title.
Ito Tozan II (1871-1937) was born the fourth son of one of the upper level samurai of the Zeze feudal domain in Otsu, just over the mountains from Kyoto and began his artistic career as a painter. He was picked up by Tozan I and introduced to the plastic arts, where he flourished, taking over the Tozan kiln in 1920, following the death of his mentor.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Metalwork : Pre 1930 item #1493526 (stock #K101)
The Kura
$750.00
A timid looking creature in dilapidated straw hat sheepishly approaches carrying his ledger and bottle for a refill. A comic image of the Tanuki with his famous beer belly reputation for heavy drinking. One can guess he will be asking for tonight’s bottle on credit as he gazes up, shoulders hunched, pleading. It is 16 cm (6 inches) tall and in excellent condition signed on the back in a silver inlayed cartouche Chikusen.
All Items : Antiques : Regional Art : Asian : Japanese : Stoneware : Pre 1930 item #1493375 (stock #K095)
The Kura
Sale Pending
A set of five covered pottery bowls by Miyagawa (Makuzu) Kozan enclosed in the original signed wooden box titled Ninsei Suimono Wan. The basic setting in Japanese food is Ichiju-Sansai or one soup, three dishes. So instead of mixing everything on one plate, each part of the meal is given its own dish. Suimono Wan are bowls for clear soup served between parts of the meal to cleanse the palette. These bowls are 8.5 cm (3-1/4 inches) diameter, 8 cm tall. One bowl has a gold repair to the lid, otherwise they are all in excellent condition.
The name Kozan was granted by Prince Yasui-no-Miya in 1851 in honor of the tea ware produced during the later Edo for the imperial Court by the tenth generation head of the Kyoto pottery family Miyagawa Chozo. The Kozan (Makuzu) kiln as we know it today was established in Yokohama in 1871 by the 11th generation head of the family where he reinvented the family business. He immediately set out on a journey which would propel the Kozan name to International Celebrity status, and send his wares throughout the globe. Pieces produced there were marked Kozan, or Makuzu, the official kiln name, or both. Although he had been running the daily operation since the late 19th century, the first son, Hanzan, succeeded as head of the kiln, in 1912, with the father officially retiring to spend more time on his own research and art. Kozan I dies in 1916. The kiln was run by Hanzan through the early Showa era, he officially taking the name Kozan II in 1917, after one year mourning for his fathers passing. Under Hanzan the kiln was commissioned for works to be presented to the Prince of Wales, the 25th wedding anniversary gift for the Taisho emperor and the Showa Emperors coronation gift. The kiln was completely destroyed in the bombing of Yokohama in 1945. For more on this illustrious family see Bridging East and West, Japanese Ceramics from the Kozan Studio by Kathleen Emerson-Dell.